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OSS

Trademark Law Against Amazon's (Mis)Use of Elasticsearch

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OSS
Legal
  • AWS faces Elasticsearch lawsuit for trademark infringement

    Elasticsearch has sued AWS for trademark infringement and false advertising in connection with the cloud giant's recently released version of the widely used Elasticsearch distributed analytics and search engine.

    Elasticsearch Inc., or Elastic, is based on the open-source Lucene project and Elastic serves as originator and primary maintainer. Tensions flared in March when AWS, along with Expedia and Netflix, launched Open Distro for Elasticsearch. The release is fully open source compared with Elastic's version and was actually prompted by Elastic's weaving too much proprietary code into the main line over time, according to AWS.

  • Open Source Search Firm Accuses Amazon of Trademark Infringement

    O'Melveny & Myers is representing search engine Elasticsearch in a complaint that alleges Amazon is willfully infringing its mark by promoting competing search and analytics products.

Open Hardware: OSKAR, Robotics, microscoPI and RISC-V

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Mobile braille keyboard available as open source

    Bachelor student Johannes Střelka-Petz has designed a portable Braille keyboard for the blind and visually impaired. OSKAR, the prototype’s name, is an open source project. The blueprints and program code are freely available online.

    When blind and visually impaired people use a computer, they use a braille keyboard which is based on their own tactile writing system. This new braille keyboard has the advantage of haptic symbols. This option is not yet available for smartphones.

  • Amazing Open Source Quadruped Capable Of Dynamic Motion

    The more we read about [Josh Pieper]’s quadruped, the mjbots quad A0, the more blown away we are by his year of progress on the design. Each part of the robot deserves its own article: from the heavily modified brushless motors (with custom planetary gears) to the custom motor driver designed just for this project.

    [Josh], realized early on that the off-the-shelf components like an ODrive just weren’t going to cut it for his application. So he designed his own board, took it through four revisions, and even did thermal and cycle testing on it. He ended up with the compact moteus board. It can pump out 400 Watts of peak power while its 3Mbit control protocol leaves plenty of bandwidth for real time dynamic control.

  • A low-cost, open-source, computer-assisted microscope

    Low-cost open labware is a good thing in the world, and I was particularly pleased when micropalaeontologist Martin Tetard got in touch about the Raspberry Pi-based microscope he is developing. The project is called microscoPI (what else?), and it can capture, process, and store images and image analysis results. Martin is engaged in climate research: he uses microscopy to study tiny fossil remains, from which he gleans information about the environmental conditions that prevailed in the far-distant past.

  • A new blueprint for microprocessors challenges the industry’s giants

    risc-v offers computer architects a way to standardise their sockets and plumbing without having to gain permission from (and pay royalties to) either of the monopolists—for any company or individual may download it from the internet. It was originally written by computer scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, who wanted an instruction set that they could use for publishable research. Commercial producers of isas were reluctant to make theirs available, so the academics decided to buckle down and write their own.

    The result, risc-v, made its debut in 2014, at the Hot Chips microprocessor conference in California. It is now governed by a non-profit foundation. Though there are no formal royalties, the foundation does solicit donations as pro bono publico gestures from firms that employ risc-v architecture—for what was once a tool for academics is now proliferating commercially.

    There are three reasons for this proliferation. The most obvious is that the lack of royalties means using risc-v is less costly than employing a commercial isa. If the final product is a high-price object like a smartphone, that may not be a huge consideration. But for cheaper devices it is. Moreover, as chips are built into a growing range of products, such as home appliances, city infrastructure and factory equipment, it makes business sense to keep them as cheap as possible.

    A second, more subtle advantage is that, unlike chips based on proprietary designs, those involving risc-v can be used without lengthy and expensive contractual negotiations. It can take between six months and two years to negotiate a licence to use a chip design involving a commercial isa. In the world of computing, especially for a cash-strapped startup, that is an eternity.

  • 5 Startups Driving The Future Of Open Source Industry

    SiFive was founded in 2015 by the designer of RISC-V, which is an open-source hardware instruction set architecture based on established reduced instruction set computer principles. SiFive is one of the new players in the chip/semiconductor industry and has managed to raise total funding of $89.59 million to date, according to a source.

    The company creates open-source chip platform and also brings software automation to the semiconductor industry. Furthermore, with its open-source platform, SiFive has taken chip designing to a whole new level. The company is also coming up with an open-source chip design tool silicon chips. All you would need to do is choose a template that suits your application, create variations using a rich library of IP, run your application code on virtualized chips, order the chips and you will receive sample chips within weeks.

Drupal and WordPress News

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Server
OSS
Drupal
  • Acquia Acquired for $1B, WordPress 5.3 on the Horizon, More Open Source News

    Acquia has announced an agreement to receive a majority investment from Vista Equity Partners, which essentially translates into the investment company purchasing Acquia for a colossal $1 billion. The investment will enable the open-source digital experience company to continue growing its presence in the digital experience platform space. “Vista shares our belief that the DXP market is ripe for disruption and we are excited to partner with them to accelerate our plans,” said Michael Sullivan, Acquia CEO.

    Acquia’s press release noted that Acquia will “continue to operate independently”.

    This announcement came shortly after being named to the 2019 Forbes Cloud 100 for the fourth consecutive year and acquiring the first enterprise-grade, low-code Drupal website builder.

  • Daily Buzz: Drupal's Big Buyout
  • WordCamp Philly returns this weekend in all its open-source, community-powered glory

    In an age where the internet’s attention is hyper focused on the most recent tweet, only to be distracted the next minute, WordPress’ decade-long staying power can be attributed to its diverse and dedicated open-source community.

    WordPress values and strives to grow its community, and one of the ways it does that is through WordCamps. Philadelphia is home to one of the oldest WordCamps in the United States, and the annual daylong event is returning this weekend, Oct. 5 and 6, at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

  • People of WordPress: Alice Orru

    Alice Orru was born in Sardinia, an island in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. As a child, she dreamt of becoming a flight attendant, traveling the world, and speaking many foreign languages.

    Unable to meet the height requirements of her chosen profession, Orru ended up choosing a different path in life, following the Italian mantra: “You have to study something that will guarantee a stable and secure job for life.”

    The unemployment rate in Sardinia is very high, a challenge shared throughout the surrounding islands. In addition to that, Alice wasn’t that keen on having the same job all her life, as her parents had.

    When Orru was 22 she moved to Siena, Tuscany, to finish her studies. That is when she created her first personal blog. The website was built on an Italian platform named Tiscali, which she later migrated to WordPress.com.

    After 2 years in Tuscany Orru moved to Strasbourg, France. She studied French and worked several jobs while living there. Her first serious job was in Milan – working 40 hours/week in the marketing department of a large, international company. She found herself surrounded by ambitious colleagues and a boss who constantly requested extra —unpaid— working hours per day.

Percona Database News

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Server
OSS
  • Percona Tunes Monitoring Platform For ‘Living Breathing’ Databases

    Modern enterprises run on information in the form of data, so they buy databases. Databases are nice solid chunky pieces of software that, once installed, neatly store away all the company’s operational and transactional information in easy-to-find predesignated areas… so after initial deployment, they pretty much look after themselves.

    Unfortunately, that’s not quite true. Databases are living breathing things that need to change and adapt to a variety of factors all the time. Here’s a selection of eight popular reasons that your firm’s information backbone might need to change...

  • Percona customers talk about database challenges

    At Percona Live in Amsterdam, the Open Source database company has released details from its latest customer survey. The results are interesting and suggest that the database market is less rigid, stable and predictable than you might think. They also show a propensity for larger customers to have more database instances than staff.

  • Percona details ‘state’ of open source data management

    Open source database management and monitoring services company Percona has laid down its state of open source data management software survey for 2019.

    Surveys are surveys and are generally custom-constructed to be self-serving in one sense or another and so convey a message set in their ‘findings’ that the commissioning body (or in this case company) has wanted to table to media, customers, partners and other related bodies.

    This central truth being so, should we give any credence to Percona’s latest market assessment?

  • Percona packages PostgreSQL alongside existing MySQL and MongoDB products

    PostgreSQL is among the most popular database management systems, but market share is a slippery thing to measure, depending on whether you mean revenue, developer activity, or actual deployed databases.

    The developer-focused StackOverflow puts PostgreSQL second after MySQL, with Microsoft SQL Server third and Oracle way down at 8th. DB-Engines on the other hand, which measures general discussion, puts Oracle top, followed by MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL 4th.

    Open-source company Percona's distribution, announced at its Percona Live event in Amsterdam, is based on PostgreSQL 11.5, supplemented by several extensions. The pg_repack extension reorganises tables with minimal locks. The PostgreSQL Audit Extension (pgaudit) provides tools for audit logs to meet compliance requirements. And backup and restore is provided by the pgBackRest extension.

  • Database Diversity: The Dirt, the Data

    Companies are using an increasingly eclectic mix of databases, a survey of 836 enterprise database users from around the world conducted by Percona reveals — with the vast majority of respondents using more than one type of open-source database.

    The survey comes as the overall database market – worth some $46 billion at the end of 2018 – continues to fragment: there are now over 40 companies with revenues of $100 million-plus in the commercial open-source ecosystem.

  • The state of open source databases in 2019: Multiple Databases, Clouds, and Licenses

    The Open Source Data Management Software Survey was undertaken by Percona, a company offering services for open source databases, to capture usage patterns and opinions of the people who use open source databases. The survey, unveiled today at Percona's Open Source database conference in Amsterdam, included 836 of them from 85 countries, which means it's a good way to get insights.

  • Percona Announces Enhanced Version of Award-Winning Open Source Database Monitoring and Management Platform, For Faster Performance Issue Resolution

James Bottomley: Why Ethical Open Source Really Isn’t

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OSS

Ethics itself is the actual process by which philosophical questions of human morality are resolved. The job of Ethics is to give moral weight to consequences in terms of good and evil (or ethical and unethical). However, ethics also recognizes that actions have indivisible compound consequences of which often some would be classified as unethical and some as ethical. There are actually very few actions where all compound consequences are wholly Ethical (or Unethical). Thus the absolute position that all compound consequences must be ethical rarely exists in practice and what people actually mean when they say an action is “ethical” is that in their judgment the unethical consequences are outweighed by the ethical ones. Where and how you draw this line of ethical being outweighed by unethical is inherently political and can vary from person to person.

To give a concrete example tied to the UN Declaration of Human Rights (since that seems to be being held up as the pinnacle of unbiased ethics): The right to bear arms is enshrined in the US constitution as Amendment 2 and thus is protected under the UNDHR Article 8. However, the UNHDR also recognizes under Article 3 the right to life, liberty and security of person and it’s arguable that flooding the country with guns precipitating mass shootings violates this article. Thus restricting guns in the US would violate 8 and support 3 and not restricting them do the opposite. Which is more important is essentially a political decision and where you fall depend largely on whether you see yourself as Republican or Democrat. The point being this is a classical ethical conundrum where there is no absolute ethical position because it depends on the relative weights you give to the ethical and unethical consequences. The way out of this is negotiation between both sides to achieve a position not necessarily that each side supports wholeheartedly but which each side can live with.

The above example shows the problem of ethical open source because there are so few wholly ethical actions as to make conditioning a licence on this alone pointlessly ineffective and to condition it on actions with mixed ethical consequences effectively injects politics because the line has to be drawn somewhere, which means that open source under this licence becomes a politicized process.

[...]

I hope I’ve demonstrated that ethical open source is really nothing more than co-opting open source as a platform for protest and as such will lead to the politicization of open source and its allied communities causing huge societal harm by removing more of our much needed unpolarized venues for discussion. It is my ethical judgement that this harm outweighs the benefits of using open source as a platform for protest and is thus ethically wrong. With regard to the attempts to rewrite the OSD to be more reflective of modern society, I content that instead of increasing our ability to discriminate by removing the fields of endeavour restriction, we should instead be tightening the anti-discrimination clauses by naming more things that shouldn’t be discriminated against which would make Open Source and the communities which are created by it more welcoming to all manner of contributions and keep them as neutral havens where people of different beliefs can nevertheless observe first hand the utility of mutual collaboration, possibly even learning to bridge the political, cultural and economic divides as a consequence.

Read more

Codecs and Google

Filed under
Google
Movies
OSS
  • Google Has Been Developing "libgav1" As New AV1 Decoder

    While there exists DAV1D as one of the most promising AV1 decoders to date, Google has been developing libgav1 as its own AV1 decoder and focused on Arm-powered Android devices but also x86_64 desktop CPUs as well.

    Google made its first libgav1 code drop on Friday for this AV1 decoder focused on AV1 profile 0 and profile 1 content. GAV1 is focused on decoding IVF files and so far features the likes of Arm NEON and x86 SSE4.1 CPU optimizations.

  • DAV1D vs. LIBGAV1 Performance - Benchmarking Google's New AV1 Video Decoder

    With the surprise code drop of Google developing a new open-source AV1 video decoder as "libgav1", I set out this Saturday to run benchmarks on various systems for seeing how the performance is looking for this CPU-based decoder in relation to the more well known DAV1D decoder.

    Libgav1 is now available alongside the many other video encoders/decoders for benchmarking via the Phoronix Test Suite with OpenBenchmarking.org. I fired up a number of different Linux systems so far in seeing how the performance compares with a wide array of AMD and Intel processors.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Browse in peace on your phone with Firefox thanks to Enhanced Tracking Protection

    Imagine that you’ve been going from shop to shop looking for a cow-shaped butter dish. Later, you walk into a department store and a salesperson walks right up to you and tries to sell you the finest specimen of a cow-shaped butter dish they’re holding in their hands.

  • Allow-overlap shape property in Writer

    Writer now has a new "allow overlap" shape property for anchored objects, which can ensure that objects with overlapping positioning properties don’t actually overlap.

  • Why GatsbyJS' corporate success is really about the individual developer experience

    It turns out lots (and lots) of developers love GatsbyJS. It also turns out that the reasons for that love are somewhat consistent: GatsbyJS, a React-based static site generator, comes with fantastic documentation, high performance, a lovely developer experience, and a robust community. There's one other thing that GatsbyJS has going for it that sometimes gets lost in the modern era of open sourcing everything: It's useful to the solo developer building a personal website in her spare time. This personal convenience, it turns out, can pave the way for corporate adoption.

    [...]

    In a phone interview with Marc Ammann, founder of design agency Matter Supply, offered additional insight. While the company, whose clients include Nike, Impossible Burger, and others, tends to build with a compact suite of tools, Ammann suggested that an employee discovered GatsbyJS in his personal time and recommended it for the work with Impossible Burger. Over the course of that engagement Ammann praised GatsbyJS for many of the same reasons listed above, but gave one more: When they had to migrate Impossible from GatsbyJS 1.0 to 2.0, instead of the two months allotted it took two weeks. That sort of deployment surprise rarely happens with tech.

  • Questions on the future of Open Source

    For a lot of these products even to this day, the only way the developers ever got compensated for their innovative work was through the salaries and equity they got from their employers, and the name recognition that made them more desirable to be hired. But a few of the major projects (Kafka and the Hadoop ecosystem being easy examples) decided to go the venture capital route, creating startups (and eventually public companies) built around these technologies. Ideally, this allows the products to be developed more reliably, funds an ecosystem of experts, consultants, trainers who can teach other developers how to effectively use and run these projects, and most importantly provides major rewards for the creators of the projects that are tied to the success of the project itself in a core way, and not just the success of the business that, as a side effect, produced the project.

    Along comes the cloud. Now, fewer and fewer people are actually taking this open source software and running it themselves. Sure, the cloud providers employ a lot of engineers, but overall they shrink the demand for widespread knowledge about the operational details of these projects. Furthermore, they capture the lion's share of the value that otherwise might have gone to the creators of the project if they were able to successfully spin the project into a company.

    As the article linked above says, the cloud providers are incentivized to hire the people who created these successful projects in the first place, or the major contributors. And they do pay well, perhaps on average a better outcome for many contributors to these projects than any startup-driven outcome might be. Economically, this might be overall good for our open source creators.

Calibre Open-Source eBook Management App Gets Major Release After Two Years

Filed under
Software
OSS

Believe it or not, it's been two years since the Calibre 3.0 series was introduced, and now, the time has come for fans of the best free ebook management software to get a brand-new release that introduces new technologies and new features, along with dozens of improvements.

"It has been two years since Calibre 3.0. This time has been spent mostly in making the calibre Content server ever more capable as well as migrating calibre itself from Qt WebKit to Qt WebEngine, because the former is no longer maintained," said developer Kovid Goyal.

Read more

Also: New in calibre 4.0

What's in an open source name?

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OSS

GNOME, Java, Jupyter, Python. If your friends or family members have ever eavesdropped on your work conversations, they might think you've made a career in Renaissance folklore, coffee roasting, astronomy, or zoology. Where did the names of these open source technologies come from? We asked our writer community for input and rounded up some of our favorite tech name origin stories.

There are many more projects and names that we have not included in this list. Be sure to share your favorites in the comments.

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Quantum computing, the open source way

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OSS

The quantum vision of reality is both strange and mesmerizing at the same time. As theoretical physicist Michio Kaku once said, "Common sense has no place in quantum mechanics."

Knowing this is a new and uncommon place, we can expect quantum innovations to surpass anything we have seen before. The theory behind it will enable as-yet-unseen capabilities, but there are also some hurdles that are slowing it from being unleashed into the real world.

By using the concepts of entanglement and superposition on quantum bits, a quantum computer can solve some problems faster than a classical computer. For example, quantum computers are useful for solving NP-hard problems, such as the Boolean satisfiability problem, known as the SAT problem. Using Grover's algorithm, the complexity of the evaluation of a boolean proposition of $n$ variables goes down from $O(n2^{n})$ to $O(n2^{n/2})$ by applying its quantum version.

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More in Tux Machines

deepin Linux 20 looks incredible

I recently sold my MacBook Pro for a few reasons, but probably most importantly, macOS just wasn't wowing me anymore. While Apple's desktop operating system is good for basic users, it is far too limited for the more hardcore. Ultimately, I found my productivity was negatively impacted by macOS -- my workflow with Windows 10 and various Linux distributions was simply better. Of course, with all of that said, macOS is much prettier than Windows 10 -- even Microsoft would confess to that. But is it more attractive than desktop Linux distributions? Well, that depends on the desktop environment. While there are plenty of beautiful DEs and launchers for Linux, only one really surpasses macOS in the looks department -- deepin. Read more

New TenFourFox and Mozilla Firefox Team News

  • TenFourFox FPR16 SPR1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release "16.1" (SPR 1) is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). As noted, this is a pure security update and there are no user-facing changes; the big under-the-hood change of those is that we are now pulling entirely from 68ESR, including locale data, certificate roots and so forth. There is also a small update to the ATSUI font blacklist. Assuming no issues, it will go live Monday evening Pacific time as usual.

  • Chris H-C: Four-Year Moziversary

    We gained two new team members, Travis and Beatriz. And with Georg taking a short break, we’ve all had more to do that usual. Glean‘s really been working out well, though I’ve only had the pleasure of working on it a little bit. Instead I’ve been adding fun new features to Firefox Desktop like Origin Telemetry. I also gave a talk at a conference about Data and Responsibility. Last December’s All Hands returned us to Orlando, and June brought me to Whistler for the first time. We held a Virtual Work Week (or “vorkweek”) a couple of weeks ago when we couldn’t find a time and the budget to meet in person, and spent it planning out how we’ll bring Glean to Firefox Desktop with Project FOG. First with a Prototype (FOGotype) by end of year. And then 2020 will be the year of Glean on the Desktop.

Linux 5.4 Lands A Number Of Memory Management Fixes

While mid-way through the Linux 5.4 development cycle with RC4 due out on Sunday, a number of memory management fixes just hit the mainline kernel. Andrew Morton's pull request was merged on Friday night and he noted, "Rather a lot of fixes, almost all affecting mm/" Indeed there were memory management fixes in this pull ahead of 5.4-rc4. Changes include a zRAM race condition fix, avoiding access to uninitialized memory maps, allow dropping transparent huge-pages (THP) from the page cache, and other fixes in this area including the possibility of a kernel crash. Read more Also: Intel's Cloud Hypervisor 0.3 Adds Block Device Offloading, Paravirtualized IOMMU

Programming: eMMC Flash, Compilers and Python

  • Some Tesla EV’s Control Screens Went Dark as Excessive Logging killed the eMMC Flash

    Despite wear-leveling techniques, eMMC flash memories tend to wear out over time as they have limited write cycles.

  • AMD Zen 2 Improvements For LLVM Have Been Held Up For Months By Code Review

    Back in February for LLVM Clang 9.0 was the initial AMD Zen 2 "znver2" enablement, but like the GCC support at the time it was the very basics. With time GCC picked up Zen 2 scheduler improvements and other work while sadly in the case of LLVM the improvements are still pending. Back in August, AMD's Ganesh Gopalasubramanian sent out the znver2 scheduler model for LLVM for Zen 2 CPUs but a focus on the EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors. "There are few improvements with respect to execution units, latencies and throughput when compared with znver1. The tests that were present for znver1 for llvm-mca tool were replicated. The latencies, execution units, timeline and throughput information are updated for znver2."

  • Python Add Lists

    This tutorial covers the following topic – Python Add lists. It describes various ways to join/concatenate/add lists in Python. For example – simply appending elements of one list to the tail of the other in a for loop, or using +/* operators, list comprehension, extend(), and itertools.chain() methods. Most of these techniques use built-in constructs in Python. However, the one, itertools.chain() is a method defined in the itertools module. You must also see which of these ways is more suitable in your scenario. After going through this post, you can evaluate their performance in case of large lists.

  • StackOverflow Report: (cxcix) stackoverflow python report