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OSS

The 5 Best Open Source Password Managers

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OSS

It won’t be wrong to say that managing passwords on your own could be a tad tricky, especially if you’re frequently registering on new websites. Although your web browser’s built-in password manager could do the trick, your passwords could still come into jeopardy in case you log in to your main account from another computer and forget to log out. If you also happen to agree, then password managing applications are just the thing for you.

On the internet, you can easily find a plethora of password managers. However, trusting their makers with your most private information could be a bit of a gamble. Apart from security concerns, a significant number of such applications also require users to pay a certain amount of money in exchange for their services. If you look further than these mainstream options, you will also find open-source software that might not be that famous but still provides users with a sense of security and doesn’t cost a single penny. Assuming that we have you sold, let’s cut to the chase and have a look at the best open-source password managers out there.

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The power of open source during a pandemic

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OSS

When a novel coronavirus made headlines earlier this year, the world wasn't ready. In a short period of time, we all witnessed the consequences of having a global, interconnected economy unprepared for effective global collaboration. Indeed, this pandemic shed light on the under-preparedness of a truly global economy in a hyper-connected world. We didn't pay attention to the fact that a health issue in China could have an impact on both the real estate market in North Carolina and a shoe factory in Italy. Facing a pandemic, especially one that forced such extreme social distancing, required drastic shifts—both technological and social.

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Secure Your Online Accounts With 2FA And Open Source

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OSS
Security

Two-Factor Authentication or Multiple Factor Authentication, is the process of using two or more ways of proving identity to online services rather than just using the password alone (password = 1 factor, password + mobile code = 2 factors… And so on). It is a security measure designed to prevent attackers from gaining access to online accounts even if the accounts’ passwords fall to their hands.

Most mainstream online services do support two-factor authentication today, though not all of them. Such as Google, Facebook, Twitter and basically all banking and critical services online support it too.

[...]

FreeOTP is a %100 free and open source mobile authentication application published under the Apache 2.0 license. Developed by the famous enterprise open source software maker Red Hat; Making it a far way more trusted than any solution coming from companies like Google.

The program, just like any other authenticator app, allows you to scan a QR code when you activate two-factor authentication on websites, and then it starts to automatically generate security codes each 30 seconds. When you want to login to your 2FA-secured account, you just have to enter the code currently shown on the app.

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5 open source activities for kids to try this weekend

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OSS

During the last six months or so, my family and I have enjoyed a slower pace of life. With few museums and parks open, we’ve stayed safer at home together or going on outdoor excursions. My young children are pretty good at creating their imaginary worlds where they could play for hours. I think they are adapting to this new normal better than I am to tell you the truth. However, there will be weekends when we have all run out of ideas. Luckily, Opensource.com is chock full of boredom-busters for kids of all ages. In this article, I rounded up a few of our more recent open source activities for kids.

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Advance your Linux skills with these 3 command line primers

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Linux
OSS

Open source powers many corporate servers, and admins need to know their way around Linux services to keep vital operations running smoothly. That means mastering the command line. The following three downloads from TechRepublic Premium will help you do just that.

TechRepublic contributorJack Wallen wrote these command-line primers. Wallen, who has been using Linux and writing about it for more than 20 years, knows the ins and outs of most Linux distributions, as well as how to keep systems running smoothly. Follow his advice on how to master the Linux command line, and your servers andusers will be in good shape.

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ORC – Anonymous Cloud Storage Helps Protect Investigative Journalism

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Software
OSS

ORC stands for Onion Routed Cloud is an anonymous cloud storage network. It is a free and open-source project. ORC allows anonymous file sharing online without the risk of leaking them to the Internet.

Why Is Anonymous Cloud Storage Important?

In times when Governments around the world are peeking into everyone’s life, Journalists and activists around the globe are finding it difficult to communicate safely on the Internet.

Journalists around the globe are being murdered, facing death threats as a consequence of their journalism. If not put under law, even social networking sites can also be a threat to freedom in a free country.

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The Open Invention Network Aims to Protect Linux and Open-Source Software with a Patent Non-Aggression Pact

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Linux
OSS
Legal

When we covered Alibaba XT910 RISC-V processor earlier this week, the company confirmed working with open-source companies to make the source code is available for the chip, but that there were legal challenges to do so for a high-performance core.

The company did not expand on what legal challenges there were, but I’m pretty sure it’s about patents and potential lawsuits. But there may be a solution, or at least a way for companies to protect themselves to some degree against patent trolls, thanks to the Open Invention Network (OIN) which I discovered in a press release about UNISOC recently joined the organization.

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Why Comcast open sourced its DNS management tool

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OSS

This open source DNS management tool was built by and for the telcom giant, but is establishing itself in its own right and welcoming more contributors.

Adoption of DevOps practices at Comcast led to increased automation and configuration of infrastructure that supports applications, back-office, data centers, and our network. These practices require teams to move fast and be self-reliant. Infrastructure is constantly turned upside down, with network traffic moved around it constantly. Good DNS record management is critical to support this level of autonomy and automation, but how can a large, diverse enterprise move quickly while safely governing its DNS assets?

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Best Free and Open Source Online Markdown Editors

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OSS

No need to install. Use these free online markdown editors to write and save your markdown notes. Some editors also offer real-time collaboration.
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Tartube – A GTK+ 3 Front-end for Youtube-DL Video Downloader

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OSS

Looking for a graphical interface for the command line youtube-dl video downloader? Tartube is a GTK+ 3 front-end written in Python 3.

Tartube is partly based on youtube-dl-gui and runs on Windows, Linux, Mac OS, and BSD. It’s a free and open-source software that can download individual videos, and even whole channels and playlists, from YouTube and all youtube-dl supported websites.

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More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • New C++ features in GCC 10

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 10.1 was released in May 2020. Like every other GCC release, this version brought many additions, improvements, bug fixes, and new features. Fedora 32 already ships GCC 10 as the system compiler, but it’s also possible to try GCC 10 on other platforms (see godbolt.org, for example). Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) users will get GCC 10 in the Red Hat Developer Toolset (RHEL 7), or the Red Hat GCC Toolset (RHEL 8). This article focuses on the part of the GCC compiler on which I spend most of my time: The C++ front end. My goal is to present new features that might be of interest to C++ application programmers. Note that I do not discuss developments in the C++ language itself, although some language updates overlap with compiler updates. I also do not discuss changes in the standard C++ library that comes with GCC 10. We implemented many C++20 proposals in GCC 10. For the sake of brevity, I won’t describe them in great detail. The default dialect in GCC 10 is -std=gnu++14; to enable C++20 features, use the -std=c++20 or -std=gnu++20 command-line option. (Note that the latter option allows GNU extensions.)

  • Yes, you can run VMs on Kubernetes with KubeVirt

    Cloud-native apps stand on four pillars: containers, DevOps, continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD), and microservices. Migrating a legacy, monolithic application to become cloud-native usually demands a significant refactoring effort. Sometimes a VM is better than a container, for example, with LDAP/Active Directory applications, tokenization applications, and applications requiring intensive GPU workloads. But it can get complicated when you have some cloud-native applications running on a Kubernetes platform and other applications running on non-Kubernetes platforms. What if you could run both containers and VMs on a Kubernetes platform? Wouldn't the world be beautiful? Enter KubeVirt, an open source project distributed under an Apache 2.0 License. It was created by Red Hat engineers to enable Kubernetes to provision, manage, and control VMs alongside container resources. KubeVirt can make it easier for an enterprise to move from a VM-based infrastructure to a Kubernetes and container-based stack, one application at a time.

  • 7 things you can do with Ansible right now

    As a computer geek, I tend to unintentionally collect computers. Sometimes they're computers I rescue from the rubbish bin, other times they're computers people give me as payment for helping them transfer their data to their newer computer, and still other times, it's a small fleet of machines I manage for charity organizations lacking finances for a "real IT guy." I can attest that anything from two to 200 computers is too many to set up and configure manually.

  • Share Ceph Storage Between Kubernetes Clusters With OpenShift Container Storage

    This week Red Hat announced the release of OpenShift Container Storage 4.5. We invited Pete Brey, Sr. Product Marketing Manager at Red Hat to deep dive into this release. One of the major highlights of this release is ‘External Mode’ that allow customer to tap into their standalone Ceph Storage platform that’s not connected to any Kubernetes cluster. It allows users to set-up a shared storage platform between different Kubernetes Clusters.

Where’s the Yelp for open-source tools?

It would be great if there were a genuinely useful rating system that would help people discover excellent but less-visible open-source projects. But an easy way to work out which of the tens of thousands of projects are the vital, important ones – a software Yelp, if you will – doesn’t exist. It may never come to be. Hope springs eternal. Brian Profitt, Red Hat‘s Open Source Program Office (OSPO) manager, is working with others on a new project to make it easy to evaluate open-source projects: Project CHAOSS. This Linux Foundation project is devoted to creating analytics and metrics that help define open-source community health. Read more

DragonFly 5.8.2 released

I tagged and built 5.8.2 today, and it should be appearing on a mirror near you, momentarily. Read more

Deepin Desktop Review: A Stylish Distro and Desktop Environment

In this Linux Desktop Environment review, we have a slightly controversial choice. Deepin, both as a distribution and as a Desktop Environment, is one that not everybody feels comfortable using and trusting. However, we’ll be setting that aside, dispelling some myths, and looking at the beautiful Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE), its user experience, some notable features, and giving some recommendations on where to experience it and who should use it. Read more