Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

4 open source productivity tools on my wishlist

Filed under
OSS

Last year, I brought you 19 days of new (to you) productivity tools for 2019. This year, I'm taking a different approach: building an environment that will allow you to be more productive in the new year, using tools you may or may not already be using.

But what about…

When searching for productivity apps, I never find everything I want, and I almost always miss something great that my readers share with me. So, as I bring this series to a close, it's time again to talk about some of the topics I failed to cover in this year's series.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Cephalocon 2020 sessions to look out for

    March is a busy month in the open source calendar, with not just SUSECON occurring in Dublin, Ireland, but also the Ceph community congregating on the city of Seoul in South Korea for the ever popular Cephalocon conference. The global Ceph community is very vibrant, and where better to hold the annual get together for lovers of the industry-leading, open source software-defined storage technology than the high-tech metropolis that is Seoul?

  • Philip Withnall: Interested in a GUADEC remote attendance party in the UK, July 2020?

    GUADEC is in Mexico this year, which is great! This means that, for once, the tables are turned and people in Europe will get to experience what everyone in the rest of the world normally experiences for GUADEC: long travel times. That’s no bad thing, but I suspect it means there’ll be more people from Europe who are taking a break from GUADEC this year.

    I don’t want to travel to GUADEC, but do want to keep up with the conference and see people. So I’m looking at organising a UK remote attendance party for GUADEC, where anyone who isn’t going to Mexico is welcome to come along for a few days, follow the conference remotely, hack together, and socialise together.

  • Journal transparency index will be ‘alternative’ to impact scores

    A new ranking system for academic journals measuring their commitment to research transparency will be launched next month – providing what many believe will be a useful alternative to journal impact scores.

    Under a new initiative from the Center for Open Science, based in Charlottesville, Virginia, more than 300 scholarly titles in psychology, education and biomedical science will be assessed on 10 measures related to transparency, with their overall result for each category published in a publicly available league table.

    The centre aims to provide scores for about 1,000 journals within six to eight months of their site’s launch in early February.

  • The need for adversarial tech-interoperability legislation

    In the words of Cory Doctorow: ?Interoperability is the act of making a new product or service work with an existing product or service?. The tech market has moved further and further away from interoperable standards in favor of vendor-lock-in or ?silos? over the last decade.

    I?ll discuss file hosting services to explain the problem with the lack of interoperable standards and argue for the need for legislation to ensure such interoperability.

    Let?s look at this app-integration with commercial file hosting providers targeted at consumers as an example. The big players in this space are Microsoft OneDrive, Google Drive, Apple iCloud, and Dropbox. There are dozens of more actors in this space.

    It?s common for all sorts of apps to integrate with one or more of these services to offer app-specific synchronization features. This is used to synchronize to-do lists, documents, and other app-specific data. A few large developers offer their own hosting services. However, many smaller app developers don?t want to take on the role of a file hosting provider. Instead, they build-in the option to synchronize using a third-party service.

  • Banks are finally embracing the Open Source movement

    Even though bank leaders are becoming convinced that leveraging open source technology is the future, banks will not transform over night to open source adepts. Just like introducing all other new technologies and methodologies, embracing open source software requires a cultural shift in the whole organization, which takes time and intensive change management.

  • Product Announcement: Chef Habitat 1.5 Now Available

    Chef Habitat provides automation capabilities for defining, packaging, and delivering applications to almost any environment with any operating system, on any platform. Over the last year, we’ve seen organizations like Alaska Airlines, Rakuten, Walmart, and Rizing address a broad range of application delivery automation challenges with Habitat. They’ve improved their developers’ productivity, reduced deployment failures, and are delivering applications consistently across a variety of platforms and technologies. 

Open Hardware/Modding-Friendly Hardware: LibreRouter, Gateworks, QNAP and 96Boards

Filed under
Development
Hardware
OSS

Flashing Builds from the Android Open Source Project

Filed under
Android
Google
OSS
  • Flashing Builds from the Android Open Source Project

    AOSP has been around for a while, but flashing builds onto a development device has always required a number of manual steps. A year ago we launched Android's Continuous Integration Dashboard, which gives more visibility into the continuous build status of the AOSP source tree. However, these builds were not available for phones and flashing devices still required a manual command line process.

  • Google Makes It Easier To Flash Android Open-Source Project On Phones

    Flashing the Android Open-Source Project (AOSP) onto devices is now a lot easier thanks to the Android Flash Tool.

    Deploying the open-source build of Android onto smartphones/tablets has been a chore with various manual steps involved from the command line, but now the Android Flash Tool makes it easy to flash builds produced via the Android Continuous Integration Dashboard onto supported devices. Android Flash Tool makes it much easier for those wanting to run AOSP builds on hardware.

  • Google Android Flash Tool Allows You to Flash AOSP From a Web Browser

The CUPS Printing System Lead Developer Has Left Apple, Begins Developing "LPrint"

Filed under
Mac
OSS

More than a decade after Apple acquired the CUPS source-code and its lead developer, that developer, Michael Sweet, recently parted ways with Apple.

Just before Christmas was an announcement by CUPS lead developer Michael Sweet that he left Apple and will be taking a break and then plans to begin forming a new business with his wife.

During his tenure at Apple, there were many CUPS improvements: much better network printing support, basic 3D printer support, IPP Everywhere, and more.

Back in 2017 though is when Apple decided CUPS would no longer be GPL licensed but they migrated to the Apache 2.0 license. Just last August came CUPS 2.3 with that licensing change and the print server's first release in three years.

Read more

7 open source desktop tools: Download our new eBook

Filed under
OSS

Linux users say that choice is one of the platform's strengths. On the surface, this might sound self-aggrandizing (or self-deprecating, depending on your perspective). Other operating systems offer choice, too, but once you look at the options available for nearly anything you want to do on Linux, it doesn't take long to conclude that a new word ought to be invented for what we mean by "choice."

User choice isn't a "feature" of Linux; it's a way of life. Whether you're looking for a whole new desktop or just a new system tray, Linux hackers provide you options. You might also be able to hack some simple commands together to create a batch processor for yourself—and you might publish it online for others, thereby contributing to the array of choice.

Read more

OSS and Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • The Importance Of Growing Developer Action On Open Source Enterprise Blockchain Solutions

    Since major enterprises started taking blockchain seriously and looking at the technology's potential in their chosen arena, so have a number of popular enterprise-grade blockchain solutions have come to the fore.

    Some of these solutions are sold to companies as an all in one solution, slightly deviating from some of the core decentralized and open-sourced pillars of the technology, but the more popular ones are open-sourced and constantly being developed. The likes of Hyperledger Fabric, as well as Sawtooth and Besu, R3 Corda, and Quorum are all open source solutions that have been tracked for developer activity by Blockchain service firm Chainstack.

  • An Open Source Alternative to AWS SageMaker

    There’s no shortage of resources and tools for developing machine learning algorithms. But when it comes to putting those algorithms into production for inference, outside of AWS’s popular SageMaker, there’s not a lot to choose from. Now a startup called Cortex Labs is looking to seize the opportunity with an open source tool designed to take the mystery and hassle out of productionalizing machine learning models.

    Infrastructure is almost an afterthought in data science today, according to Cortex Labs co-founder and CEO Omer Spillinger. A ton of energy is going into choosing how to attack problems with data – why, use machine learning of course! But when it comes to actually deploying those machine learning models into the real world, it’s relatively quiet.

  • Ambitions for a Unix Shell

    As discussed in the January blog roadmap, I want to concretely describe a reduced Oil language, and see if we can get it "done" in 2020.

    So, to give context to upcoming posts about the language, let's review the project's goals from different perspectives: [...]

  • Inside Open-Source Networking

    In this edition of the Embedded Insiders podcast, Brandon and Rich continue their journey into the world of open source, this time by focusing on Z-Wave that was recently donated to the community by Silicon Labs (who acquired the networking technology from Sigma Designs).

    Later, the Embedded Insiders are joined by Laurens Slats from The Things Industries, who continues the discussion of open source networking technologies by outlining the state of LoRa and LoRaWAN. Their upcoming Things Conference in Amsterdam takes place January 30-31st.

  • Rockstar dev debate reopens: Hero programmers do exist, do all the work, do chat a lot – and do need love and attention from project leaders

    The idea that some software developers matter more to coding projects than others is controversial, particularly among open source projects where community cohesion and participation can suffer if contributors are not treated fairly.

    Scott Hanselman, partner program manager at Microsoft, argued against the notion of rockstar programmers back in 2013, as have many others. But not everyone agrees and it's a difficult debate to settle because there's no consensus about what to measure, much less about the methods used to make the measurements.

    What's more, projects may have different needs at different times – a dominant contributor may help bring projects to life but then become a liability when the project is mature.

    The latest entry into this long-running argument comes from a research paper, "Why Software Projects need Heroes (Lessons Learned from 1000+ Projects)," published last year [PDF] and just revised [PDF] with 16 additional pages.

  • Tierion introduces set of open-source tools to create 'trustless' Lightning apps
  • Nextcloud evolves into Nextcloud Hub to better meet your company's needs

    The Nextcloud developers have unleashed one of their most significant upgrades to their on-premises cloud hosting platform: Nextcloud Hub. I was invited to test the pre-release version and never before have I been so impressed with a piece of open source software. Nextcloud has evolved from a tool that can be installed and expanded with a number of applications, to an out-of-the-box, one-stop shop collaboration suite.

    Once installed, Nextcloud Hub includes built-in video chat, OnlyOffice integration, and so much more--out of the box. Admins will no longer have to install or connect to a separate OnlyOffice server. That's big news for anyone who's taken the time to add business-grade collaboration to the Nextcloud platform. Open source now has a seriously robust and user-friendly web-based office groupware suite.

    This evolution of the hottest on-premises cloud server software will come about with the next release (version 18 is available now) and will bring with it a full-blown, fully-featured cloud-based set of collaboration tools unlike anything you've witnessed in an open source stack.

  • LSD welcomes Knowledge Focus to Planet Open Source

    The strategic integration is the result of a shared vision to unify and further strengthen competencies across key open source solution spaces.

    With this merger, LSD hopes to explore new opportunities with their combined superpowers and will continue to deliver market-leading open-source solutions.

  • SUSI.AI release 20200120: Desktop and Smart Speaker

    More than a month has passed, but the winter holidays allowed me to update, fix, and stream line a lot of corners in SUSI.AI. And above all, work on a desktop version that can easily be installed. Thus, the FOSSASIA Team finally can release a SUSI.AI 2020-01-20 of SUSI.AI, the privacy aware personal assistant.

  • FOSDEM by train

    I’ve always loved train journeys, but with flygskam changing people’s travel preferences across Europe (and possibly worldwide, though probably not that much), I decided to take train to FOSDEM this time.

    [...]

    As some of my readers may know, my backpack was stolen from me after FOSDEM two years ago, and with it were gone, among other things, my passport and my residence permit card. With my flight home having been planned two and half hours from the moment when I realised my things are gone, I couldn’t get a replacement travel document quickly enough from the embassy, so I had to stay at my friends in Vilvoorde (thanks a lot again, Jurgen!) and travel with the cheapest ground transportation I could find. In my case, it was a night RegioJet coach to Prague with a connection to (again) RegioJet train to Bratislava. (I couldn’t fly even though I already had my temporary travel document since I might need to somehow prove that I’m allowed to be in the Schengen zone, which is difficult to do without a valid residence permit.) Sleeping on a bus isn’t the best way to travel for long distances, and I was knackered when I finally dropped on my sofa in Bratislava next morning. However, what I learnt was that it was possible, and were it a bit more comfortable, I wouldn’t mind something like this again.

  • Now available: Open source solar contracts to simplify transacting

    A team of legal advisors and renewable energy experts contributed to an Open Solar Contracts Initiative to accelerate the deployment of solar power worldwide.

    The open source project was initiated by the Terrawatt Initiative (TWI) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in 2016.

  • joão leão develops the first open source electric skateboard made out of recycled plastic

    designer joão leão constantly ran into plastic waste washing ashore on the beaches of porto; he was also constantly running late due to his endless commute on public transportation. so, he created a faster method of personal transportation using recycled thermoplastics as the main manufacturing material — the PET MINI electric skateboard.

    [...]

    leão took inspiration from the anatomy of an armadillo for the electronics enclosure by designing a series of modular pieces along the bottom of the board. this allows for both the protection of the electronic components, and also maintains the flexibility of the deck — giving it the comfortable ride necessary for the city. other commercial products lose the deck’s flexibility, making it a rough ride through different urban terrains.

  • How I had a nerdy date night with StreetComplete quests

    StreetComplete is an Android app that makes it fun and easy to contribute to open data by completing quests.

    Quests are used to fill in incomplete or inaccurate information on OpenStreetMap, an open data project dedicated to mapping the world through crowdsourcing. Anyone can contribute to the map and, thanks to free culture and open source licenses, that data can then be used by anyone for anything, from video games to custom map applications and artwork.

    [...]

    Download the app to your phone from F-Droid or Google Play. It’s licensed under GPLv3.

  • Academic publishing must better serve science and society

    We propose a new vision for scientific publishing that starts with reversing the relationship between authors and publishers. Under this system, authors would be able to make their research freely accessible to everyone immediately. Journal editors would compete to publish it, but publication would not be the end of the story: researchers could continue to update their papers for years afterwards. Nor would publication be the aim of the game: the incentives, recognition and reward systems would not depend on where a paper is published, but rather on its contents and the extent to which it advances knowledge.

    This is already starting to happen. The number of preprints is increasing daily, and most journals now facilitate the submission of papers to preprint servers via their own submission systems. Others have appointed preprint editors to screen preprints and solicit submissions, adopting scoop protection policies that commit them to disregarding, in their editorial decisions, any competing papers published after submission of the paper or preprint.

Open Hardware/Modding: Arduino IDE, Raspberry Pi and PocketPCR

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Arduino IDE 1.8.11 now available to download

    The Arduino development team has today announced the availability of a new Arduino IDE in the form of Arduino 1.8.11. The open-source Arduino Software (IDE) makes it easy to write code and upload it to the range of Arduino development boards board. The Arduino IDE can be loaded onto Windows requires Win 8.1 or 10, Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion or newer, and Linux 32 and 64 bit computers and is written in Java and based on Processing and other open-source software.

  • Can you connect a Raspberry Pi to a GoPro Hero 6?

    A contractor is drilling in the office space above ours, and it sounds like we’re under attack by a swarm of very angry, Transformeresque bees. We can’t hear ourselves think. Although we can hear the drills.

  • Put The Power Of PCR In Your Pocket With This Open-Source Thermal Cycler

    When the first thermal cyclers for the polymerase chain reaction came out in the 1980s, they were as expensive as a market driven by grant money could make them. Things haven’t got much better over the years, largely shutting STEM classes and biohackers out of the PCR market. That may be about to change, though, if the €99.00 PocketPCR thermal cycler takes hold.

    PCR amplifies DNA in a three-step process: denaturation, which melts double-stranded DNA into single strands; annealing, which lets small pieces of primer DNA bind to either side of the region of interest; and elongation, where the enzyme DNA polymerase zips along the single strands starting at the primer to replicate the DNA. The cycle repeats and copies of the original DNA accumulate exponentially. Like any thermal cycler, [Urs Gaudenz]’s PocketPCR automates those temperature shifts, using a combination of PCB-mounted heating elements and a cooling fan. The coils rapidly heat a reaction block up to the 99°C denaturation temperature, the fan brings that down to the 68°C needed for annealing, and then the temperature ramps back up to 72°C for elongation with thermostable DNA polymerase. PID loops keep the reaction temperature precisely controlled. The whole thing is, as the name suggests, small enough to fit in a pocket, and can either be purchased in kit form or scratch-built from the build files on GitHub.

Best Open Source Games in 2020

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

There’s no reason to spend $60 on a new AAA release just to bring some variety into your gaming diet when there are many fantastic open source games that are completely free and just as engaging as their big-budget counterparts.
It’s true that open source games seldom give you the graphical fidelity you may be used to from the most technically advanced games of this console generation, they give you something many best-selling titles today desperately miss: captivating gameplay.

Read more

Best Open Source Secure Email Gateway Packages

Filed under
OSS

Secure Email Gateways or Email security gateways are gateways designed to filter mail traffic. Some mail providers and other types of organizations implement this solution to fight attacks like phishing, email-borne attacks, viruses, malwares and more attacks which can be filtered by an email gateway, but it also can prevent information leak by infidel members of the organization, etc. It is a controller of mail content which rules according to the specified rules and policies.
Email Secure Gateways are available as a cloud service, as virtual appliance, locally at the mail server and there are both software and hardware solutions but this article focuses on 5 Email Security Gateways: MailScanner, MailCleaner, Proxmox, Hermes Secure Email Gateway and OrangeAssasin, all them include free versions while some offer additional paid versions with extra features.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines