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OSS

World's Most Trusted Open-Source Firewall, pfSense, Patched Against WPA2 KRACK

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Released two weeks ago, pfSense 2.4 is a major update to the BSD-based firewall software that introduces an all-new installer based on bsdinstall with built-in ZFS support, revamped Captive Portal to work without multiple instances of the IPFW stateful firewall, support for UEFI machines, as well as support for multiple types of partition layouts like GPT and BIOS.

pfSense 2.4 also introduces support for Netgate ARM devices, such as SG-1000, support for OpenVPN 2.4, Negotiable Crypto Parameters (NCP), dual stack/multihome, and numerous other improvements. Now, the first point release, pfSense 2.4.1, is already out to patch the system against the infamous WPA2 KRACK (Key Reinstallation Attack) security vulnerability.

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My first open source experience: 4 takeaways

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A month ago, the term open source meant little to me. Then I enrolled in a class called "Foundations of an Open Source World," and now open source principles are integral to my way of thinking, and the community constantly amazes me.

As a complete open source rookie, I often wished for an instruction manual to help ease my transition into the community. Following are four takeaways from my journey, in hopes that they will help other newcomers.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Fon joins prpl Foundation to accelerate open-source innovation for the Digital Home and Carrier WiFi

    The prpl Foundation, an open-source, community-driven, not-for-profit consortium with a focus enabling the security and interoperability of embedded devices for the smart society of the future, has today announced that Fon has joined the Foundation. As the world’s leading WiFi software company, Fon joins prpl to accelerate the development of a common, open-source-based software framework which will enable deployment of new carrier services for the digital home and carrier WiFi hotspots.

  • Vendors, Get Used to Life Under Open Source

    Next Generation Optical Networking (NGON) -- The future for service providers seems to be a mixture of open source software and good old standardization, which means vendors are going to have to get used to the open source way of life, one AT&T executive believes.

    AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) does still need vendors to play the role of technology innovators. But "the way that vendors provide that in the future will be different from how they provide that today," said Amy Wheelus, AT&T's vice president of cloud and D2 platform integration.

  • Should You Open Source Your Product? That’s the Wrong Question

    I often get called in to help companies make decisions about their open source strategy. They want to release key parts of their software as open source, but they need some help figuring out the best way to make it happen. I always ask them the same question:

    Why? Why are you planning to open any of your code?

    They rarely have a good answer. They’ve already decided that this is the right decision, because a board member, founder, or customer has said it’s necessary, and they are just trying to figure out how to do it. But it’s impossible to build a strategy to accomplish your goals if you’re unsure what they are.

    Are you trying to build a community? To get public review of core functionality? To grow adoption? Something else entirely? By now most people have realized that open sourcing software isn’t a route to magically get free contributions so you don’t have to write your own software, but there are plenty of other myths around it.

  • Top 3 open source Cryptocurrencies (that aren’t bitcoin)

    The term open source gets thrown around a lot, and most of the time, the people saying it don’t even know what it means. The best way to think of it like a book everyone can edit and make their own version of it. The source code is available to all, which creates the option for developers to look at the code and come up with their own modifications. These modifications won’t necessarily be adopted, but they are at least out there for the community to consider and vote upon.

  • What is Ethereum? The open-source crypto platform explained

    Most of us get the principle of cryptocurrency, but even the most tech-savvy may struggle with the specifics. One name that is often used when discussing this increasingly popular trend is Ethereum. 

    Ethereum is an open-source platform that lets you build your own decentralised applications, and earn a tradeable cryptocurrency called Ether. These apps are all built using blockchain technology, and Ether can be used to pay for services on the network.

  • JAX Magazine: All eyes on Open Source
  • AWS Offers Aurora Cloud DB Service Compatible With PostgreSQL

    AWS on Tuesday announced the general availability of Amazon Aurora with PostgreSQL compatibility. The service is now fully compatible with both MySQL and PostgreSQL, the company said. AWS also announced that customers migrating to Amazon Aurora from another database can use the AWS Database Migration Service free of charge for the next six months. Amazon Aurora is a cloud-optimized relational database that combines the speed and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases.

  • Microsoft's new open source tool can scan your website for security and performance headaches [Ed: Company that gives back doors to NSA wants to 'help' security? When Microsoft speaks about security it means "access to our partners" (even remotely), but not (yet) for the "bad guys" (until leaks).]
  • Microsoft's open source sonar tool helps developers find security flaws in their websites
  • Microsoft’s open-source Sonar tool will test your site’s performance and security
  • TIBCO Embraces Open Source with Smarter Microservices and Event-Driven Microgateways
  • Tibco adds microgateway to its open source offerings

    Integration and analytics vendor Tibco has released its open source event-driven microgateway along with a new version of Project Flogo for deep learning microservices.
    Nio

  • Linux Academy, Cloud Assessments Secures $6.8M Series A Funding
  • Linux Academy and Cloud Assessments Brings In $6.8 Million
  • ARM Proposes Changing GCC's Default Optimization Level To -Og

    The GNU Compiler Collection currently uses -O0 as the default optimization level when no other optimization level is passed. An ARM developer is proposing the default optimization level be changed to -Og.

  • Community Data License Agreement announced by Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation has announced the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) family of open data agreements. In an era of expansive and often underused data, the CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing “open” data.

  • INL adds MASTODON to growing open-source modeling and simulation library

    Idaho National Laboratory recently expanded its library of MOOSE-based, open-source modeling and simulation software with the MASTODON code. This code helps scientists and engineers design buildings and other structures to better withstand seismic events.

    MASTODON is the short name for the Multi-hazard Analysis for STOchastic time-DOmaiN phenomena. It is a finite element application that calculates the realistic response of soil and structures to earthquakes in three dimensions. With capabilities to simulate “source-to-site” earthquake energy release, the software tool enables detailed analyses of earthquake fault rupture, nonlinear seismic wave propagation, and nonlinear soil-structure interactions.

Events: Chrome Dev Summit, GSoC Mentor Summit, Google Code-in, Samsung's 'Open Source Conference’, Raleigh's ATO

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OSS
  • Chrome Dev Summit 2017

    I attended the 5th Chrome Dev Summit this week. The talks were all recorded and are available via the schedule (the keynote and leadership panel on day 1 are perhaps of broadest interest and highest bang-for-buck viewing value). It was a high quality, well-produced event with an intimate feel – I was very surprised when Robert Nyman told me it was over 700 people! I appreciated the good vegetarian food options and noticed and was very impressed by the much-better-than-typical-tech-conferences gender representation and code of conduct visibility.

  • The 2017 GSoC Mentor Summit

    I am wrapping up the ideas after the Google mentor summit 2017. In spite of having mentored my first GSoC student in 2008, this is the first time I ever attended this summit. There were ~300 mentors representative of many different open source communities. A triple-concentrate of all the main open projects in a not-too-noisy environment (unlike e.g. FOSDEM) – all in all, it has been a very pleasant experience!

  • Google Code-in 2017 open source mentor organizations revealed, including Ubuntu!

    Google does a great job supporting the open source community, which is appropriate, as the company leverages the code too. The search giant gives back to the community through programs such as "Google Code-in." If you aren't familiar, it is an educational contest which teaches children about open source by having them working on an actual established project. Today, the Android-maker reveals the mentors that will be participating in Google Code-in 2017.

  • Samsung Electronics Kicks Off ‘2017 Open Source Conference’

    Samsung Electronics will hold 'Samsung OpenSource Conference' at Samsung Electronics Seoul R & D campus in Ueon-dong, Seoul from October 25 to 26.

    The Samsung Open Source Conference, which has been held every year since 2014, is the largest open source conference in Korea with over 1,000 developers participating in the program every year.

  • Is Raleigh the East Coast's Silicon Valley?

    They are also awed by the conference itself. This year well over 3,000 people shelled out somewhere around a couple of hundred bucks each to attend the two-day event, which took place earlier this week and utilized more than 20 meeting rooms at the Raleigh Convention Center to house over 200 sessions.

Events: Latinoware 2017, FOSDEM 2018, Open Source Summit

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OSS
  • Latinoware 2017 Event Report

    Of more than 200 subjects discussed by more than 4,500 nerds, teachers, students and interested in new technologies, coming from various parts of Brazil, neighboring countries Argentina and Paraguay and outside countries, during  three days of the 14th Latin American Congress of Free Software and Technologies (Latinoware), held last week at the Itaipu Power Plant in Foz do Iguaçu, one of the themes that most attracted public attention was how free robotics can improve education, especially in children.

  • FOSDEM 2018 Retrocomputing DevRoom Call for Participation

    FOSDEM is a free software event that offers open source communities a place to meet, share ideas and collaborate. It is renown for being highly developer-oriented and brings together 8000+ participants from all over the world. It is held in the city of Brussels (Belgium).

  • Open source summit - Day 2

    Day two of Open Source summit for me started a bit slow for lack of sleep. The first talk I went to was on "Developer tools for Kubernetes" by Michelle Noorali and Matt Butcher. Essentially the two of them showed two projects (Draft and Brigade to help ease development apps for Kubernetes clusters. Draft here is the tool to use for developing long running, daemon like apps. Brigade has the goal of making event driven app development easier - almost like providing shell script like composability to Kubernetes deployed pipelines.

Why is Kubernetes so popular?

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OSS

Kubernetes, an open source container management system, has surged in popularity in the past several years. Used by the largest enterprises in a wide range of industries for mission-critical tasks, it has become one of the biggest success stories in open source. How did that happen? And what is it about Kubernetes that explains its widespread adoption?

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OSS Leftovers

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Open Source Virtual Signaling? Or, Why Do You Really Like Open Source?

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Open source software is everywhere these days -- from Microsoft to government agencies to (maybe) your car. In a world where open source is so pervasive, I can't but wonder: Do the myriad companies that now push open source really believe in it, or is it mere virtue signaling?

This is a fair question to ask. Many of the companies that are now very publicly promoting open source were once antithetical to open source.

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7 open source alternatives to Dreamweaver

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Not all that many years ago, pretty much every webpage on the Internet was, at some level, designed painstakingly by hand. It was tough, and before CSS really took hold and became well supported across most common browsers, it often involved hacking a layout together by using HTML tables in a way they were never really envisioned to support.

While some designers developed workflows completely based around manual editing of raw HTML files, the WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) editor began to emerge as a tool of empowerment to millions of amateur and professional designers who didn't know, or at least hadn't mastered, the art of hypertext markup.

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PredictionIO and Apache Software Foundation

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Development
OSS
  • PredictionIO, open-source software for building machine learning apps, gets Apache top-level status

    The Apache Software Foundation said today that it’s designating open-source machine learning software first developed by Salesforce.com Inc. as its latest top-level project.

  • Open-Source ML Server Gets Apache Promotion

    The pace of machine learning technology development got another boost this week with the announcement that an open source platform donated last year by Salesforce has been promoted by the Apache Foundation.

    Apache PredictionIO, designated a “top-level” project on Tuesday (Oct. 24), aims to democratize machine learning by giving developers a full stack for creating intelligent applications that could be deployed in production “without having to cobble together underlying technologies,” said Simon Chan, founder of Prediction IO who now services as senior director for Salesforce’s AI initiative called Einstein.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos