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OSS

Linux/FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Your freedoms are eroding as technology becomes more closed

    We’re not doing a good job of keeping the Internet and related technologies as open and egalitarian as they used to be, allowing a dangerous oligopoly to reemerge. How can we reverse the trend? And by we, I actually mean you.

  • Senlin for VMware Integrated OpenStack brings open source up to speed

    The Senlin clustering service delivers a one-two punch, enabling developer productivity while proving VMware's commitment to improving open source technology.

  • Open Source Couchbase Mobile Now Scales on Demand

    The open source Couchbase Mobile platform comprises: the Couchbase Lite NoSQL embedded database for mobile and Internet of Things (IoT) devices; the Couchbase Server that stores and manages data in the cloud; and the Couchbase Sync Gateway that synchronizes data between the two.

  • Inertia Slows Evolution For Open Scientists

    It is still a long way to a new generation of “open scientists”, German open data researcher Christian Heise found out in his just-published PhD thesis. Heise not only investigated drivers and barriers for what he expects to be an evolution from open access to open science by theory and a survey of over 1100 scientists. He tried the concept open science the hard way, opening up the writing of his thesis paper on the net.

  • Open Source textbooks could save students a bundle

    As the cost of college has skyrocketed, students and parents could soon get relief on expensive textbooks under the Textbook Cost Savings Act of 2017 that would provide funding to develop free open source learning materials.

    “The state is moving rapidly towards free textbooks online,” said the bill’s sponsor Sen. Jim Rosapepe, D-Prince George’s, in an interview. “If the bill passes it will be state policy that we want to move in that direction as much as possible.”

  • Mathematics for Computer Science: a free, CC-licensed MIT textbook

    This is indeed an up-to-the-minute text [PDF], dated Mar 7, 2017. It's written by Googler/MIT prof Eric Lehman, MIT/Akamai scientist F Thomson Leighton and MIT AI researcher Albert R Meyer, as a companion to their Mathematics for Computer Science open course.

  • The Open Source Toolkit – meet the Channel Editors

    The Open Source Toolkit features articles and online projects describing hardware and software that can be used in a research and/or science education setting across different fields, from basic to applied research. The Channel Editors aim to showcase how Open Source tools can lead to innovation, democratisation and increased reproducibility.

  • Vulkan 1.0.43 Adds Two New Extensions

    The Khronos Group has done a Friday evening update to the Vulkan 1.0 API specification.

    Vulkan 1.0.43 includes a number of GitHub and internal-Khronos issues around document clarifications and other minor behavior differences.

Linux and FOSS Events: LibrePlanet 2017, foss-north 2017, Strata+Hadoop World 2017, UCLA Linux User Group

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OSS

How open source has taken over our lives

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OSS
Gaming

The next time you play Uncharted 4 on PlayStation 4, The Legend of Zelda on Nintendo Switch, or tell Alexa to turn the lights off, bear in mind it’s all running on open source.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Open Source Vs. Commercial BI Software [Ed: False dichotomy right from the get-go (headline). FOSS can definitely be - and often is - commercial]
  • GAPID: Google Has A New Graphics Debugger For Vulkan & OpenGL ES

    GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and is a new open-source project out of Google.

    Adding to the list of available open-source debuggers is GAPID. GAPID allows inspecting, tweaking, and replaying calls to OpenGL ES and Vulkan. GAPID is primarily geared for debugging GLES/VLK Android applications but the user-interface runs on Windows, Linux, and macOS. The tracer is able to run on those host operating systems as well as Android.

  • Bouncing Back To Private Clouds With OpenStack

    There is an adage, not quite yet old, suggesting that compute is free but storage is not. Perhaps a more accurate and, as far as public clouds are concerned, apt adaptation of this saying might be that computing and storage are free, and so are inbound networking within a region, but moving data across regions in a public cloud is brutally expensive, and it is even more costly spanning regions.

  • Blockchain for Supply Chain: Enormous Potential Down the Road
  • Open source project management can be risky business[Ed: Correction to this article; Netflix not "openly developed." DRM and proprietary.]

    Our digital lives are powered by programming philosophers who choose to develop their code out in the open.

    All programs begin with lines of instruction. When ready for execution these lines of instruction are converted to a binary format that the computer can execute. Open source programs are programs where the human readable code is accessible to anyone. This philosophy of openness and freedom has allowed these projects to impact the lives of everyone.

    The Linux kernel is the core of all Android devices, and nearly a third of all Internet traffic rides on just one openly developed project, Netflix. (Read the excellent article in Time magazine about this.) How does the choice of using open source software as part of a project plan affect the amount and type of risk to a project within an organization?

  • Teradata open sources Kylo data lake management software
  • Teradata debuts open-source Kylo to Quickly Build, manage data pipelines
  • Teradata debuts IntelliCloud to blend data and analytic software as a service with expanded deployment choice
  • HTC Will Open Source Full-Body Tracking For Vive With Tracker

    Speaking to UploadVR at MWC, Alvin Graylin, President of Vive in China, said that HTC had been working on a “similar system” for full body tracking in its China research lab, and would be open sourcing it for all developers to implement into their experiences for free.

  • Social Commerce: Encouraging African Start-ups To Lean On Open Source

    The internet is evolving and there is a lot of excitement because no one is quite sure what it will look like in the next five years. However one thing that is sure about its evolution is that it will keep getting more social.

    Open Source software is currently being leveraged on by developers across the globe not just for blogging and publishing but also for designing feature rich and secure internal process systems and enterprise resource tools.

    Social commerce is a one of this new concepts which is relatively new especially in the Africa web space hence the need to train start-ups on how to tap into and fully explore this new innovation.

  • Klaxon, an open-source tool from The Marshall Project, helps journalists track newsworthy changes to websites

    The Marshall Project, a non-profit news organisation that covers the criminal justice system in the United States, has developed a free and open-source tool that allows reporters and editors to track websites of interest and receive notifications via Slack or email when newsworthy changes happen.

  • Growing Up Node: Lessons for Successful Platform Migration

    Switching from one technology to another is always going to be hard, and, despite the popularity of Node.js, it does come with its own set of complexities, and the advantages are not always apparent to management, says Trevor Livingston, principal architect at HomeAway, speaking at Node.js Interactive.

  • SunCamp happening again this May!

    As I announced in mailing lists a few days ago, the Debian SunCamp (DSC2017) is happening again this May.

    SunCamp different to most other Debian events. Instead of a busy schedule of talks, SunCamp focuses on the hacking and socialising aspect, without making it just a Debian party/vacation.

  • Making Drupal upgrades easy forever

    After a lot of discussion among the Drupal core committers and developers, and studying projects like Symfony, we believe that the advantages of Drupal's minor upgrade model (e.g. from Drupal 8.2 to Drupal 8.3) can be translated to major upgrades (e.g. from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9). We see a way to keep innovating while providing a smooth upgrade path and learning curve from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9.

  • ScyllaDB Secures $16M in Series B Funding
  • Israeli app builder co ScyllaDB raises $16m
  • ScyllaDB raises $16 million to facilitate app building

The Companies That Support Linux and Open Source: Hart

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Linux
Interviews
OSS

Hart is a medical software technology company that improves the ways in which people inside and outside of the industry access and engage with health data.

Founded in 2012, the startup develops HartOS, an API platform that allows healthcare providers and their vendors and partners to use health data from multiple computer systems in a HIPAA-compliant manner in a range of digital formats. These may include medical records, hospital information, radiology information, laboratory information, picture archiving, emergency department, and other systems.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • How to make money from open source software

    Talk about starting a business based on open source software and the conversation will inevitably shift to Red Hat. That's because the Linux vendor is a shining example of a company that's making money from an open source product. But how easy is it really to establish an open source startup that makes money? For every success story like Red Hat there are companies like Cyanogen that fail to thrive and projects that are abandoned.

    It's tempting to believe that the Red Hat business model, which is based around selling subscriptions for support to a maintained and tested version of Linux (or a closely related model that offers consultancy and customization to an open source software solution as well support and maintenance), is the most viable way to make money from open source software. But Sam Myers, a principal at Balderton Capital, a technology venture capital company, says that most open source startups are unlikely to succeed using these business models.

  • The grueling emotional labor of an open source maintainer

    Nolan Lawson is burning up the free/open source web with an essay called What it feels like to be an open-source maintainer, where he describes the contradictory and negative experiences of trying to please hundreds of people who are just trying to get his code to work, where the more emotional and technical work he does to make them happy, the more he ends up with.

  • Introduction to gRPC

    The hot new buzz in tech is gRPC. It is a super-fast, super-efficient Remote Procedure Call (RPC) system that will make your microservices talk to each other at lightspeed, or at least that’s what people say. So this article will take a quick look at what it is, and how or when it can fit into your services.

  • Open source technology in enterprise

    With many organisations having moved to more open source adoption, more than 90% admit there are potential or hidden costs in doing so.

    Up to half admit to not taking the different costs of open source into account in their decision-making, such as training, recruiting and replacing employees with essential data science skills.

    [...]

    What is clear are that many organisations see clear benefits from open source and many are already deploying these solutions, with plans to grow their use of open source.

    Respondents listed a number of customer benefits. Almost half believe it can help bring opportunities in terms of a wider range and more personalised products and services. Around four in 10 feel it can help with faster resolution of problems.

  • Chrome 57 arrives with CSS Grid Layout and API improvements
  • Chrome 57 rolling out now to Mac, Windows, and Linux
  • Google Chrome 57 Launches with CSS Grid Layout, Improved "Add to Home" Screen

    Just a few moments ago, Google promoted the Chrome 57 web browser to the stable channel for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    Chrome 57.0.2987.98 is now the newest stable version of the applications, and it looks like it comes with various new features and improvements that have been revealed during its Beta stages of development, such as CSS Grid Layout, an improved "Add to Home" screen, as well as a Media Session API (Application Programming Interface).

  • Firefox 52 kills plugins – except Flash – and runs up a red flag for HTTP

    The Mozilla Foundation has has given the world the fifty-second version of the Firefox browser, complete with some significant changes.

    Most notable is the eviction of plug-ins. The browser will now only run Flash. Anything else reliant on the Netscape Plugin API (NPAPI) is now verboten. Which means Silverlight, Java and Acrobat are gone, daddy, gone.

  • LLVM 4.0 Compiler Stack Is Getting Prepped For Release

    The LLVM compiler infrastructure stack and Clang C/C++ compiler front-end will see their version 4.0 release within the next few days.

    LLVM/Clang 4.0 has dragged on due to unresolved blockers compared to their targeted release date about two weeks ago, but the good news now that after the additional release candidates, the bugs have been resolved.

  • Indian State of Kerala Saves $58 Million Each Year By Using Free And Open Source Software

    In Kerala, IT became a compulsory subject in 2003. It was followed by the phased adoption of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) in 2005. This was done to replace the proprietary software.

Openwashing and Attacks on FOSS

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OSS

GSoC 2017

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Google
OSS
  • Netfilter in GSoC 2017

    Great news! The Netfilter project has been elected by Google to be a mentoring organization in this year Google Summer of Code program. Following the pattern of the last years, Google seems to realise and support the importance of this software project in the Linux ecosystem.

  • Over 200 Open Source Orgs Mentoring GSoC 2017

    The list of mentoring organizations for this year's Google Summer of Code has been posted and there's a record number of them. The list includes large and well known projects together with smaller and less familiar ones.

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More in Tux Machines

5 open source RSS feed readers

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds. And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too. Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use
    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive. In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat! Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.
  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity
    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.
  • Gammu 1.38.2
    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations. The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.
  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics
    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow. In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.
  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn
    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.
  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?
    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time. Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.

Docker/Kubernetes/Containers

  • Containerization Leaders Explore Possible Standardized Data Storage Interface
    A group of engineers from every leading container orchestrator maker have gathered together, virtually, around an initiative to explore a common lexicon for container-based data storage. Initially proposed by Mesosphere’s Benjamin Hindman, the Container Storage Interface initiative — which, for now, is essentially a GitHub document — is exploring the issue of whether the community at large, and their users, would benefit from a standardized API for addressing and managing storage volumes.
  • What are the top open source tools for Docker management?
  • Enterprise container DevOps steps up its game with Kubernetes 1.6
    Managing containers isn't easy. That's where such programs as Docker swarm mode, Kubernetes, and Mesosphere can make or break your containers initiatives. Perhaps the most popular of these, Kubernetes, has a new release, Kubernetes 1.6, that expands its reach by 50 percent to 5,000 node clusters. Conservatively, that means Kubernetes can manage 25,000 Docker containers at once.