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MythTV 29.1 Released

Filed under
Movies
OSS
  • MythTV 29.1 Released

    Last July marked the release of MythTV 29 as the latest release of this once super popular Linux DVR/PVR software. Today marks the availability of MythTV 29.1.

  • Happy Release Day!

    The MythTV Team is pleased to announce the release of MythTV version v29.1

Server: STORK, Cisco Container Platform, and CoreOS

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Portworx open-sources STORK software to fix issues with data services on Kubernetes

    Software container company Portworx Inc. is unveiling a new open-source project aimed at developers, enabling them to run stateful applications such as databases, queues and key value stores more efficiently on Kubernetes.

    The STorage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes, or STORK, works by communicating with storage drivers via a plugin interface so it can help address a number of issues that plague data services when running container software at scale.

  • Cisco jumps into containers

    How do you know when a technology has really made it? When companies that are not known for being innovators adopt it. That's the case today, as Cisco announced its Cisco Container Platform (CCP), a Kubernetes-based container platform. Another day, another company betting on Kubernetes for the cloud win.

    The CCP is designed to enable companies to build multi-cloud architectures with consistent application deployment and management on Cisco HyperFlex, virtual machines (VMs), and bare metal, both on premises and in the cloud. It will be available first on HyperFlex in April 2018. CCP will show up on other platforms this summer.

  • Red Hat buys the creator of a Chrome-based OS for servers

    The underpinnings of Chrome OS have found their way into the server room in a very roundabout way. Red Hat has acquired CoreOS, the creators of an operating system for containerized apps (Container Linux) that shares roots with both Google's Chromium OS project and Gentoo Linux. The $250 million deal promises to help Red Hat fulfill its dreams of helping people use open code to deploy apps in any environment they like, whether it's on a local network or multiple cloud services.

  • Red Hat Acquires CoreOS to Bolster Its Containerisation Efforts

    Expanding its presence in the world of containerisation, Red Hat has announced the acquisition of CoreOS, the container management startup that has been renowned for its CoreOS Tectonic, for $250 million (roughly Rs. 1,600 crores). The new deal is not only likely to help the North Carolina-headquartered company that is dominating the open source market but would also eventually give a boost to the existing enterprise-grade containerised infrastructure. CoreOS is also popular for developing Container Linux, which is a dedicated platform for containerised apps. The operating system shares foundations with Google's Chromium OS and Chrome OS in addition to leveraging modular Linux distribution Gentoo Linux. Having said that, the core interest of the acquired company lies within Kubernetes that is a modern distributed system designed by Google.

  • Linux Pioneer Red Hat Buys CoreOS for $250 Million

    Red Hat is an acknowledged player in open-source technologies, best known for its contribution to the success of Linux. The company has just disclosed a deal to buy CoreOS Inc. for $250 million – the container applications provider could be a great fit for the Red Hat ecosystem.

    Their products include a Linux distribution, also called CoreOS and Tectonic – a container management system based on Kubernetes, originally a Google platform.

    Red Hat already possesses a sizable container offerings portfolio, like Red Hat OpenShift, along with Kubernetes capabilities. CoreOS’s complementary solutions would accelerate development and encourage businesses to move to hybrid cloud structures – now a quick, easy transition.

Top 7 open source project management tools for agile teams

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OSS

Opensource.com has surveyed the landscape of popular open source project management tools. We've done this before—but this year we've added a twist. This time, we're looking specifically at tools that support agile methodology, including related practices such as Scrum, Lean, and Kanban.

The growth of interest in and use of agile is why we've decided to focus on these types of tools this year. A majority of organizations—71%—say they are using agile approaches at least sometimes. In addition, agile projects are 28% more successful than projects managed with traditional approaches.

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How I coined the term 'open source'

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OSS

In a few days, on February 3, the 20th anniversary of the introduction of the term "open source software" is upon us. As open source software grows in popularity and powers some of the most robust and important innovations of our time, we reflect on its rise to prominence.

I am the originator of the term "open source software" and came up with it while executive director at Foresight Institute. Not a software developer like the rest, I thank Linux programmer Todd Anderson for supporting the term and proposing it to the group.

This is my account of how I came up with it, how it was proposed, and the subsequent reactions. Of course, there are a number of accounts of the coining of the term, for example by Eric Raymond and Richard Stallman, yet this is mine, written on January 2, 2006.

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6 pivotal moments in open source history

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OSS

Open source has taken a prominent role in the IT industry today. It is everywhere from the smallest embedded systems to the biggest supercomputer, from the phone in your pocket to the software running the websites and infrastructure of the companies we engage with every day. Let's explore how we got here and discuss key moments from the past 40 years that have paved a path to the current day.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • India's RJio Plots Open Source Disruption

    Owned by Indian billionaire Mukesh Ambani, the telco believes that it is high time India developed products and services tailored specifically to the Indian market. "If you observe, a lot of effort has been put into the IT space [in India], but what has not happened is a focused effort [for innovation] in the telecom space," says Matthew Oommen, RJio's president of networks, global strategy and service development, on the sidelines of India's recent Digital Open Summit.

  • Open Source Initiative Turns 20

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI) will celebrate its 20th anniversary on Friday, Feb. 2, and the global non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and adoption of open source software is gonna par-tay. By which I mean, the OSI has scheduled activities around the world this year to commemorate the event. (I'm hoping there will be snacks.)

  • Swatantra17

    Last month Thiruvananthapuram witnessed one of the biggest Free and Open Source Software conference called Swatantra17. Swatantra is a flagship triennial ( actually used to be triennial, but from now on organizers decided to conduct in every 2 years.) FOSS conference from ICFOSS. This year there were more than 30 speakers from all around the world. The event held from 20-21 December at Mascot hotel, Thiruvananthapuram. I was one of the community volunteer for the event and was excited from the day it announced Smile .

  • DO or UNDO - there is no VACUUM

    To put this another way, it is in general true that PostgreSQL’s VACUUM implementation has gotten progressively better at reclaiming space occupied by dead tuples more quickly and with less expenditure of effort. And that’s really good, because the faster you reclaim space, the less new space you end up allocating, which keeps tables small and performance high. However, the examples above show that VACUUM isn’t the whole problem. In these examples, even if VACUUM ran at the earliest instant when it could reclaim the space occupied by dead tuples and ran infinitely fast, the table would still become bloated. In the case where the bloat is caused by many short queries run while one long-running transaction remains open, we could, with smarter snapshot management, limit the worst-case bloat to approximately a factor of two -- that is, we’d keep the version of the tuple visible to the old snapshot and the current version, and discard the intermediate versions, a trick PostgreSQL currently can’t manage. However, even a factor of two is a lot, and what if there are multiple distinct open snapshots?  Further, in the case where the bloat is created by a SQL statement that induces scattered updates throughout the table, no improvement to VACUUM can possibly help. By the time that SQL statement finishes, the damage is already done.

  • Scratch group projects – 2018

    Once again, it’s time for this year’s Scratch projects from my grade 10 students. Up next is python, but their final projects are available at https://scratch.lesbg.com. Feel free to play them and rate them. This is a first attempt for students, so do please be gentle on the ratings.

  • Why Create a New Unix Shell?

11 Myths About the RISC-V ISA

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Despite its rich ecosystem and growing number of real-world implementations, misconceptions about RISC-V are keeping companies around the world from fully realizing its benefits.

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dNOS at the Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
Server
OSS
  • AT&T dNOS Project Taps Linux Foundation for Disaggregated Operating System

    AT&T is introducing the disaggregated Network Operating System – dNOS – in an effort to stimulate the creation of flexible, open and less expensive equipment that fits easily into virtualized networks.

    The open source project will be hosted by The Linux Foundation. The idea is to create a software framework enabling a broad and diverse equipment ecosystem – software developers, network operators, cloud providers, hardware makers, networking application developers and others – to use generic white box infrastructure to provide cost and efficiency advantages.

  • AT&T to offer alternative to integrated networking equipment with open source dNOS project

    AT&T says it plans to open source the Disaggregated Network Operating System, or dNOS project, to offer the industry an open, flexible alternative to traditional integrated networking equipment. Hosted by the Linux Foundation, the dNOS project will deliver a software framework to progress white box adoption and use in a service provider's infrastructure. Software developers, cloud providers, network operators, hardware makers, and networking application developers will have the ability to develop new white box infrastructure to affordably meet customer's changing demands, says AT&T.

Compact, low-power serial device gateway runs FreeRTOS on Cortex-M3

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OSS

Artila’s “Aport-213” is a low-power, industrial strength, single port serial-to-WiFi gateway that offers WiFi-based remote access to devices such as meters, sensors, and switches without requiring the development of wireless LAN drivers and security supplicants.

The Airport-213 is the newest member of Artila’s industrial communications gateways family. The device runs FreeRTOS on an unspecified 166MHz Cortex-M3 SoC, and offers 802.11 wireless connectivity to serially-interfaced devices for monitoring and control functions. The compact, low-power device can be configured as a transparent bridge, allowing a serial device to be accessed wirelessly without requiring modifications to existing software, says the company.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.

Purism News

  • February 2018 coreboot update now available
    Hey everyone, I’m happy to announce the release of an update to our coreboot images for Librem 13 v2 and Librem 15 v3 machines. All new laptops will come pre-loaded with this new update, and everyone else can update their machines using our existing build script which was updated to build the newest image. Some important remarks:
  • Purism Releases Updated Coreboot Images For Their Laptops
    Purism has released updated Coreboot images for their Librem 13 v2 and Librem 15 v3 laptops. The updated Coreboot images are now re-based to Coreboot 4.7, Intel FSP 2.0, IOMMU (VT-d) support is now available, TPM support is also enabled, and there are fixed ATA errors for 6Gbps speeds.
  • New Inventory with TPM by Default, Free International Shipping
    In November, we announced the availability of our Trusted Platform Module as a $99 add-on for early adopters, something that would allow us to cover the additional parts & labor costs, as well as test the waters to see how much demand there might be for this feature. We thought there would be “some” interest in that as an option, but we were not sure how much, especially since it was clearly presented as an “early preview” and offered at extra cost.

Mycroft AI on Plasma

Mycroft is running through the last 24 hours of the crowdfunding campaign for its Mark II assistant. The machine looks awesome and offers similar functionality to other proprietary alternatives, but with none of the spying and leaking of personal data. The Mark 2 will be delivered to backers at the end of this year, but you can enjoy the pleasures of giving orders to an AI right now by installing the Mycroft widget on Plasma courtesy of KDE hacker Aditya Mehra. Read more

Android Leftovers