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PostgreSQL 13 Released!

Filed under
Server
OSS

  • PostgreSQL 13 Released!

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group today announced the release of PostgreSQL 13, the latest version of the world’s most advanced open source database.

    PostgreSQL 13 includes significant improvements to its indexing and lookup system that benefit large databases, including space savings and performance gains for indexes, faster response times for queries that use aggregates or partitions, better query planning when using enhanced statistics, and more.

    Along with highly requested features like parallelized vacuuming and incremental sorting, PostgreSQL 13 provides a better data management experience for workloads big and small, with optimizations for daily administration, more conveniences for application developers, and security enhancements.

  • PostgreSQL 13 released

    Version 13 of the PostgreSQL database management system is out. "PostgreSQL 13 includes significant improvements to its indexing and lookup system that benefit large databases, including space savings and performance gains for indexes, faster response times for queries that use aggregates or partitions, better query planning when using enhanced statistics, and more. Along with highly requested features like parallelized vacuuming and incremental sorting, PostgreSQL 13 provides a better data management experience for workloads big and small, with optimizations for daily administration, more conveniences for application developers, and security enhancements."

  • PostgreSQL 13 Released With Performance Improvements

    PostgreSQL 13.0 is out this morning as the latest major update to this widely-used relational database server.

    There are many improvements to find with PostgreSQL 13.0 from better performance to helpful additions for database administrators. Among the PostgreSQL 13 highlights are:

    - Larger databases will find improvements to its indexing and lookup performance for indexes, faster response times for some queries, space savings, better query planning, and more.

Where’s the Yelp for open-source tools?

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OSS

It would be great if there were a genuinely useful rating system that would help people discover excellent but less-visible open-source projects. But an easy way to work out which of the tens of thousands of projects are the vital, important ones – a software Yelp, if you will – doesn’t exist. It may never come to be.

Hope springs eternal. Brian Profitt, Red Hat‘s Open Source Program Office (OSPO) manager, is working with others on a new project to make it easy to evaluate open-source projects: Project CHAOSS. This Linux Foundation project is devoted to creating analytics and metrics that help define open-source community health.

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9 Best Free and Open Source Linux Hex Editors

Filed under
Linux
OSS

A hex editor is a special type of editor that can open any type of file and display its contents, byte by byte. The “hex” in “hex editor” is short for hexadecimal, which is a base-16 number system. This type of editor lets you view and edit binary files. A binary file is a file that contains data in machine-readable form (as opposed to a text file which can be read by a human).

Since a hex editor is used to edit binary files, they are sometimes known as a binary editor or a binary file editor. If you edit a file with a hex editor, you are said to hex edit the file, and the process of using a hex editor is called hex editing.

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Manage knowledge with BlueSpice, an open source alternative to Confluence

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OSS

Knowledge management is a key to success in modern enterprises—but it is not exactly easy to achieve. Keeping track of all relevant details across all employees is a huge challenge, especially in agile environments, which most companies say they are.

Most companies resort to buying wiki-like solutions, such as Confluence from Atlassian, which exposes them to the lock-in effect of proprietary software. But many would do well to consider BlueSpice, an open source alternative to Atlassian Confluence that has a noble ancestry: it's based on Wikipedia's MediaWiki.

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6 Best Free and Open Source Linux Anti-Spam Tools

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Linux
OSS

Email is one of the primary communication channels among users. The Radicati Group is an organization which publishes quantitative and qualitative research on business and consumer usage for email, instant messaging, social networking, wireless email, and unified communications. Their research estimates that the total worldwide emails in 2020 is 306 billion.

The cost of spam is frightening, estimated to be approximately $50 billion each year. The tide of the daily spam is a continual thorn in the side for both providers and users. Spam is a waste of valuable network bandwidth, disk space and takes up users’ valuable time to declutter their mailboxes. Many spam messages contain URLs to a dubious website or websites, peddling fake pharmaceutical products, replicas, enhancers, or gambling. Alternatively, the URLs may be phishing attacks, for example taking an unwitting victim to a site which seeks to steal private information such as bank account login data.

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Is Open Source a Religion?

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OSS

Is open source a religion? There is a persistent myth that free/open source software (F/OSS) supporters think of F/OSS as a religion. SUSE is the largest open source software company, so that would make us, what, a church with the cutest mascot?
Of course this is wrong and F/OSS is not a religion, though the idea of working in a hushed cathedral-like atmosphere with pretty stained glass and organ music is appealing. (Visit St. John’s Cathedral in Spokane, Washington, USA to see a real genuine full-sized pipe organ. When it hits the low notes it rattles your bones from the inside.) If I really want stained glass and my own cathedral I can have those for just because, so let us move on to what F/OSS is really about, and what the value is for everyone who touches it, like customers, vendors, learners, hobbyists, governments– you might be surprised at the reach of F/OSS and its affect on the lives of pretty much everyone.

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Free Software Leftovers

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OSS
Legal
  • WordPress Mobile Engineers Propose Dual Licensing Gutenberg under GPL v2.0 and MPL v2.0

    During a Q&A session at WordCamp Europe 2020 online, Matt Mullenweg mentioned that Gutenberg contributors were considering dual licensing for embedding Gutenberg in mobile apps, along with the requirement that they would need to get an agreement from all contributors. WordPress mobile engineer Maxime Biais has just published a proposal for discussion, recommending dual licensing the editor under GPL v2.0 and MPL v2.0.

    [...]

    Mobile app developers are limited by the GPL, because it requires the entire app to be distributed under the same license. The team is proposing dual licensing under MPL v2.0, a weaker copyleft license that is often considered to be more “business-friendly.” It allows users to combine the software with proprietary code. MPL v2.0 requires the source code for any changes to be available under the MPL, ensuring improvements are shared back to the community. The rest of the app can be distributed under any terms with the MPL v2.0 code included as part of a “larger work.”

  • NoSQL databases: what is MongoDB and its use cases?

    Databases like MongoDB, a NoSQL document database, are commonly used in environments where flexibility is required with big, unstructured data with ever-changing schemas. This post explains what a NoSQL database is, and provides an overview of MongoDB, its use cases and a solution for running an open source MongoDB database at scale.

  • What Cassandra users think of their NoSQL DBMS

    With the NoSQL market expected to be worth $22 Billion by 2026, big business is paying Apache Cassandra a lot of attention. While MongoDB dominates NoSQL, 52.71% to Cassandra's 9.73%, Cassandra, with its ability to deliver continuous availability, high performance, and scalability to large volumes of unstructured data, will always be a player. Now, if only there were more expert Cassandra administrators!

    A global survey of 1,404 Cassandra practitioners found a plurality thought the lack of skilled staff and the challenge of migration was blocking Cassandra's adoption. To be exact, 36% of users currently using Cassandra for mission-critical apps said that a lack of Cassandra-skilled team members was deterring its broader adoption.

    When asked what it would take for practitioners to use Cassandra for more applications and features in production, they said it needs to be "easier to migrate" and "easier to integrate." That's because "we don't have time to train a ton of developers, so that time to deploy, time to onboard, that's really key. All the other stuff, scalability, that all sounds fine," said a London-based senior Cassandra user.

    That may be in part because of those surveyed, 89% were using open-source Cassandra. If they were using DataStax, the most popular Cassandra distro, it might be a different story.

  • Olauncher gives your home screen an open-source, minimalist makeover

    Android's open, customizable nature is one of the things that attract a lot of enthusiasts to the platform. From manufacturer-specific tweaks to third-party default app replacements, there's usually a way to make your phone look and act how you choose. Olauncher is a new home screen replacement app that endeavors to bring an open-source, lightweight, and minimal setup to your phone.

    And minimal it is — there's time and date info up top, a list of apps below ... and that's it. The clock and app list can be set to left, center, or right orientations. A maximum of six app names can be displayed, but if you're the most minimal of minimalists, you can set it to show no apps at all. But wouldn't that render it useless? Not quite! By default, swiping to the left launches the camera and swiping to the right opens up the dialer, but you can customize these as you choose. A swipe up opens the full app list organized alphabetically.

8 Best Free and Open Source Console Email Clients

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OSS

For the traditionalists, emails remains a fundamental part of the operating system. Fortunately, there is a wide selection of free email software available on the Linux platform which is stable, feature laden, and ideal for personal and business environments.

The vast majority of Linux users would never be satisfied without access to a graphical user interface. However, even in 2020 there remain many reasons why console based applications can be extremely desirable.

Although console applications are very useful for updating, configuring, and repairing a system, their benefits are not only confined to system administration. Console based applications are light on system resources (very useful on low spec machines), can be faster and more efficient than their graphical counterparts, they do not stop working when X/Wayland needs to be restarted, and they are great for scripting purposes.

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Best Free and Open Source Terminal Session Recording

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OSS

The vast majority of computer users depend on a graphical user interface, and fear the command line. However, the command line holds significant power and versatility. Commands issued from a shell offer system administrators a quick and easy way to update, configure and repair a system.

The benefits of the command line are not only confined to system administration. The ability to transverse the file system quickly, give more information about files and directories, automate tasks, bring together the power of multiple console tools in a single command line, and run shell scripts are just a few examples of how the command line can offer a potent, multifarious toolbox.

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The great filter of open source projects

Filed under
LibO
Moz/FF
OSS

So, with the recent layoffs at Mozilla — among other things — a bit of discussion on the sustainability of open source projects has been reignited. There was a wide range of takes: from “FOSS is dead” (no) to “we need to re-decentralize the internet” (yes). I could not quite help putting forth opinions on the matter myself and did so on a short twitter thread. Fundamentally though, the opinions expressed on this matter seem to almost talk past each other — and I think the reasons for this might be found in history of open source(1).

[...]

Another — later — project, that I am assuming to have been quite resilient and which I am assuming will continue to be quite resilient is gentoo linux: By requiring users to compile all software themselves, this distribution makes their users either give up on their installs or gets them at least halfway to be packagers (and for a distribution, packagers are contributors) themselves. Also, by not having to deal with binaries, gentoo reduces its infrastructure needs to a minimum. And even while there are some signs of downsizing at gentoo, I am hopeful that the flexibility mentioned above makes gentoo more sustainable and self-reliant than others for quite some time to come.

[...]

All of the above projects, commoditized their complements and this allowed users, who were not contributors to still benefit from the work of those who were as these contributors were interested in protecting the complement.

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Where’s the Yelp for open-source tools?

It would be great if there were a genuinely useful rating system that would help people discover excellent but less-visible open-source projects. But an easy way to work out which of the tens of thousands of projects are the vital, important ones – a software Yelp, if you will – doesn’t exist. It may never come to be. Hope springs eternal. Brian Profitt, Red Hat‘s Open Source Program Office (OSPO) manager, is working with others on a new project to make it easy to evaluate open-source projects: Project CHAOSS. This Linux Foundation project is devoted to creating analytics and metrics that help define open-source community health. Read more

DragonFly 5.8.2 released

I tagged and built 5.8.2 today, and it should be appearing on a mirror near you, momentarily. Read more

Deepin Desktop Review: A Stylish Distro and Desktop Environment

In this Linux Desktop Environment review, we have a slightly controversial choice. Deepin, both as a distribution and as a Desktop Environment, is one that not everybody feels comfortable using and trusting. However, we’ll be setting that aside, dispelling some myths, and looking at the beautiful Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE), its user experience, some notable features, and giving some recommendations on where to experience it and who should use it. Read more

The 10 Best Raspberry Pi Emulators Available in 2020

Raspberry Pi is a mini-computer as well as a marker board that comes with all the hardware built-in and is designed to make coding easier. You will find everything necessary, including RAM, CPU, and GPU on the boards. However, no matter how perfect Raspberry Pi looks, it isn’t capable of doing a lot of things, including running x86 apps. As a result, we need the Raspberry pi emulators to help us with the problems. One of the most amazing uses of these emulators is to play any of your favorite classic retro games using them on your Pi board. Read more