Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

Filed under
OS
OSS

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit.

It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer.

Read more

Events: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017, GStreamer Conference 2017, FSFE Assembly During 34C3

Filed under
OSS
  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 in Tokyo
  • GStreamer Conference 2017 Videos

    Taking place this weekend in Prague has been the 8th annual GStreamer Conference, which is preceding next week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference Europe.

  • Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3

    With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, there are not only logistic changes to be done but also some organisational changes. We are still figuring out the details, but in the context of this call, one of the major changes will be the loss of free available rooms to book for self-organised sessions. Instead, assemblies that match with each other are asked to cluster around 1 of several stages and use that as a common stage for self-organized sessions together. To make the most of this situation, the FSFE will for the first time not join the Noisy Square this year but form a new neighbourhood with other freedom fighting NGOs – in particular with our friends from European Digital Rights. However, at this point of time, we do not yet have more information about the concrete or final arrangements.

How to manage casual contributors to open source projects

Filed under
OSS

Increasingly, people want to contribute to projects casually—when they want to, rather than adhering to a schedule. This is part of a broader trend of "episodic volunteering" noted by a wide range of volunteer organizations and governments. This has been attributed not only to changes in the workforce, which leave fewer people able to volunteer with less spare time to share, but also to changes in how people perceive the act of volunteering. It is no longer seen as a communal obligation, rather as a conditional activity in which the volunteer also receives benefits. Moreover, distributed revision-control systems and the network effects of GitHub, which standardize the process of making a contribution, make it easier for people to contribute casually to free/libre/open source software (FLOSS) projects.

Read more

Party Like It's 1987 - PC-MOS/386 Goes Open Source

Filed under
OS
OSS

The idea of a multi-user operating system is almost a tautology today but back in the 1980s it wasn't all that common - at least when it came to personal computing. PC-MOS was a multi-user operating system that, like DR-DOS and others, competed with Microsoft's MS-DOS before eventually disappearing at the Redmond juggernaut crushed almost all its competition. Now, Roeland Jansen, Gary Robertson and Rod Roark have put the operating system onto GitHub as an open source project so we can all mess with its source code.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Canada’s Spy Agency Releases its Cyber-Defense Tool for Public
  • Canadian govt spooks open source anti-malware analytics tool

    The Communications Security Establishment (CSE) said the AssemblyLine tool is designed to analyse large volumes of files, and can automatically rebalance workloads.

  • Microservices served on blockchain, in open source

    Cloud application marketplace company Wireline is working with open source blockchain project developer Qtum

    The new union is intended to provide a conduit to consuming microservices at [web] scale using blockchain at the core.

    As we know, microservices offer the ability to create Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) without having to manage the underlying hardware and software infrastructure.

    [...]

    The Qtum a blockchain application platform combines the functions of Bitcoin Core, an account abstraction layer allowing for multiple virtual machines and a proof-of-stake consensus protocol aimed at tackling industry-use cases.

    The Qtum Foundation, headquartered in Singapore, is the decision-making body that drives the project’s development.

  • Rendering HTML5 video in Servo with GStreamer

    At the Web Engines Hackfest in A Coruña at the beginning of October 2017, I was working on adding some proof-of-concept code to Servo to render HTML5 videos with GStreamer. For the impatient, the results can be seen in this video here

  • Working Intel CET Bits Now Land In GCC8

    A few days back I wrote about Intel's work on Control-flow Enforcement Technology beginning to land in GCC. This "CET" work for future Intel CPUs has now landed in full for GCC 8.

    The bits wiring up this control-flow instrumentation and enforcement support are now all present in mainline GCC SVN/Git for next year's GCC 8.1 release.

  • Using Gitea and/or Github to host blog comments

    After having moved from FSFE’s wordpress instance I thought long about whether I still want to have comments on the new blog. And how I would be able to do it with a statically generated site. I think I have found/created a pretty good solution that I document below.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

Filed under
OSS

Experienced open source developers are in short supply. To attract top talent, companies often have to do more than hire a recruiter or place an ad on a popular job site. However, if you are running an open source program at your organization, the program itself can be leveraged as a very effective recruiting tool. That is precisely where the new, free online guide Recruiting Open Source Developers comes in. It can help any organization in recruiting developers, or building internal talent, through nurturing an open source culture, contributing to open source communities, and showcasing the utility of new open source projects.

Why does your organization need a recruiting strategy? One reason is that the growing shortage of skilled developers is well documented. According to a recent Cloud Foundry report, there are a quarter-million job openings for software developers in the U.S. alone and half a million unfilled jobs that require tech skills. They’re also forecasting the number of unfillable developer jobs to reach one million within the next decade.

Read more

OSS: F-Droid, Rackspace, Oracle, CableLabs, Hacktoberfest, Mozilla, Facebook

Filed under
OSS
  • 7 years of open source: Twilio, Synopsys & Veracode

    “What was once considered fringe and anti-establishment has now become the norm powering some of the largest technological innovations of our times. In the fields of artificial intelligence, machine learning, autonomous driving and block chain, OSS leads the way,” said Mel Llaguno , open source solution manager at Synopsys Software Integrity Group.

  • F-Droid, the open-source app repository, has been updated to v1.0

    If you are a big Android enthusiast, then you're probably familiar with the name F-Droid. If not, it's an extensive repository of open source apps, as well as the name of its accompanying client. Today that client has been updated to v1.0.

    If you remember our coverage of v0.103, v1.0 should look pretty familiar. While there have been some significant changes behind the scenes, apart from a general improvement in performance and ease of use, you're not likely to notice much.

  • Rackspace ends discount hosting for open source projects

    Rackspace has ended a program under which it offered “generous discounts on hosting for more than 150 OSS projects and communities”, but flubbed the announcement.

    The closure of the program came to our attention after Reg operatives noticed the Tweet below from Eric Holscher, who posted an image in which it appears the fanatical services company planned to withdraw the discount entirely.

  • Oracle Joins Serverless Race with Open Source Fn Project

    Oracle has released Fn, a new open-source, cloud-agnostic, serverless platform. While supporting ‘any programming language’, it initially launched with extensive Java capabilities and a JUnit test framework.

    Fn comprises four of main components: Fn Server, Fn FDKs, Fn Flow and Fn Load Balancer. Written in Go, Fn Server is the platform that runs the code.

  • CableLabs Hints That It’s Planning an Open Source Group

    In a meeting at the SCTE-ISBE Cable Tec Expo show yesterday, Randy Levensalor, lead architect at CableLabs involved with the group’s software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) work, mentioned that CableLabs is planning to announce an open source group soon. He didn’t provide any further detail other than to say CableLabs will be making an announcement in about a month.

    We can speculate that it relates to CableLabs’ SNAPS initiative. SNAPS stands for “SDN/NFV Application development Platform and Stack.” The key objectives for SNAPS are to make it easier for NFV vendors to onboard their applications and to reduce the complexity of integration testing. The initiative attempts to accelerate the adoption of network virtualization, wrote Levensalor in a recent blog posting.

  • Hacktoberfest 2017 @ Tel Aviv

    I gave my “Midburn – creating an open source community” talk in Hacktoberfest 2017 @ Tel Aviv. This is the local version of an initiative by DigitalOcean and GitHub.

  • Bringing Mixed Reality to the Web

    Today, Mozilla is announcing a new development program for Mixed Reality that will significantly expand its work in Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) for the web. Our initial focus will be on how to get devices, headsets, frameworks and toolsets to work together, so web developers can choose from a variety of tools and publishing methods to bring new immersive experiences online – and have them work together in a fully functional way.

  • Facebook open sources concurrent programming debugger

    Learning how to do sequential computing, where one calculation is made after the other, is easy. Anyone who learns programmings gets that. Parallel programming, which empowers super-computing calculations to be made simultaneously, is much harder, but doable. Concurrent computing, where multiple calculations are made within overlapping time frames, now that's hard. It's also extremely useful whether it's tracking multiple trains on a single train-line or multiple comments on a single Facebook page. That's why Facebook has worked hard on concurrent programming. Now, Facebook is sharing its newest debugger tool: RacerD, its new open source race detector.

  • DragonFly 5.0 released!

     

    The normal ISO and IMG files are available for download and install, plus an uncompressed ISO image for those installing remotely.  

Mastodon 2.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

About 6 months have passed since April, during which the major mainstream breakthrough of our decentralized social network took place. From 20,000 users to almost a million! What better time to run through a couple examples of what’s been introduced since then?

Mastodon is defined by its focus on good user experience, polished design and superior anti-abuse tools. In that vein, the web app has received numerous updates. Using the latest browser features, the web app receives real push notifications, making it almost indistinguishable from a native mobile app. It works faster and looks smoother thanks to many performance and design improvements.

Read more

Room for Improvement: Areas Where Open Source Can Get Even Better

Filed under
OSS

Open source software delivers a huge amount of value. But it stands to offer even more. Here's a list of the ways open source can evolve to meet the needs of developers and organizations even better than it does today.

Opportunities for continued evolution and improvement in open source include:

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on Devices: RasnAnd, WinSystems, and Cincoze

  • RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.2 for Raspberry Pi 3 – Build 171019/170805 – with GAPPS, Aptoide TV and Kodi 18.0-ALPHA1 to be installed in Linux
    RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.2 Build 170805 can be installed in Windows using Win32 Disk Imager. This method has one disadvantage. Only about 5GB can be used as data storage no matter which card you use. I have therefore today uploaded a new version, which can be (must be) installed using a Linux system. The new system from 171019 is basically the same system as the RaspAnd system from 170805. I have only added AIDA 1.47 and replaced Google Chrome with Firefox 56.0. Kodi has been upgraded from version 17.3 to version 18.0-ALPHA1. Now say, for example, that you use Micro SD card (preferable a class 10 card) of 64GB about 56GB can be used as data storage. This is of course a big advantage. When you are done with partitioning of the card it shall look like the screenshot below shows. The needed partitions for RaspAnd are created with GParted in Linux.
  • RaspAnd Brings Android 7.1.2 Nougat to Your Raspberry Pi 3 with GAPPS, Kodi 18.0
    GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton announced the release of a new build of his commercial RasnAnd project that lets users run Google's Android mobile operating system on their Raspberry Pi 3 single-board computers.
  • Rugged PC/104-Plus SBC runs Linux on a Vortex86DX3 SoC
    WinSystems has launched a rugged “PPM-C412” PC/104-Plus SBC with a dual-core Vortex86DX3, dual LAN ports, and -40 to 85°C and dual display support. The PPM-C412 is being promoted by Arlington, Texas based WinSystems as an upgrade path for users of the circa-2009 PPM-LX800, a PC/104-Plus SBC with a 500MHz AMD Geode LX800 processor much like its circa-2008 cousin, the LPM-LX800. Like the recent WinSystems PCM-C418 PC/104 SBC, the PPM-C412 runs Linux, DOS, or other x86-based RTOSes on DMP’s x86-based, dual-core Vortex86DX3 SoC.
  • Highly modular industrial computer offers Kaby Lake or Skylake CPUs
    Cincoze’s rugged, “DX-1000” system offers 6th or 7th Gen Core and Xeon 3 chips plus triple displays, dual hot-swap SATA, 4x mini-PCIe, and other expansion.

TheSSS 23.0

  • TheSSS 23.0 available for download.
    This is a major release based on the 4MLinux Server 23.0, meaning that the components of the LAMP server are now: Linux 4.9.52, Apache 2.4.28, MariaDB 10.2.9, and PHP (5.6.31 and 7.0.24). Webmin has been updated to the version 1.850. Much improved support for SCSI, RAID and LVM devices is now available out of the box. And finally, the biggest change is related to the installation script, which now makes it possible to install TheSSS on ext2, ext3, ext4, reiserfs, jfs, xfs, btrfs, and nilfs2 partitions.
  • The Smallest Server Suite Updated with Better Support for SCSI and RAID Devices
    4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki‏ is informing us today on the release and immediate availability for download of version 23.0 of his TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) lightweight and open-source Linux OS. Based on the upcoming 4MLinux 23.0 operating system, TheSSS 23.0 release is here to upgrade its LAMP (Linux, Apache, MariaDB and PHP) components to new versions, and it's now powered by Linux kernel 4.9.52 LTS, Apache 2.4.28, MariaDB 10.2.9, as well as both the newer PHP 7.0.24 and the older PHP 5.6.31 for compatibility. The latest Webmin 1.850 web-based system configuration tool is included as well in this major release of TheSSS, which comes with an updated installation script that lets users install the Linux-based server OS on various popular file systems, including Btrfs, EXT2, EXT3, EXT4, XFS, ReiserFS, JFS, and NILFS2.

Games: Singularity: Escalation, ASTROKILL and More

Red Hat News