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OSS

Best Free and Open Source Software – November 2020 Updates

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OSS

The table above shows articles updated in November 2020.

For our entire collection, check out the categories below. This is the largest compilation of recommended software. The collection includes hundreds of articles, with comprehensive sections on internet, graphics, games, programming, science, office, utilities, and more. Almost all of the software is free and open source.

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How this open source security tool halted significant DDoS attacks

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In 2020, our ways of living and working were turned completely upside down in a matter of days. As COVID-19 began to spread across the globe, we brought our companies home, and staying connected to our colleagues, friends, and family online became a critical necessity. This opened the door for hackers to cause disruption; for example, distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks around the world were up 151% in the first half of the year, according to Neustar.

CrowdSec is an open source security engine that analyzes visitor behavior and provides an adapted response to all kinds of attacks. It parses logs from any source and applies heuristic scenarios to identify aggressive behavior and protect against most attack classes. It then shares that intelligence with other CrowdSec installations; every time an internet protocol (IP) address is blocked, it informs the entire user community. This creates a real-time, collaborative IP reputation database that leverages the crowd's power to make the internet safer.

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15 Best Self Hosted Wiki Software for Linux

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Linux
OSS

A Wiki is a collection of web pages that is collaboratively edited by its users. Its content and structure of wikis are designed to be easily modified using a simple markup language. A wiki is powered by an engine, i.e. software that facilitates the creation and modification of its web pages typically implemented as a web app running on at least one server.

The most popular wiki we have today is Wikipedia, which is popular for being the usual landing page of every researcher whether they admit it or not, as well as hobbyist readers.

Today’s article brings you a list of the most resourceful software with which you can host your very own wiki. Listed in order of their user ratings, here are the 15 best self-hosted wiki software for your Linux computer.

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Unboxing the Raspberry Pi 400

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Linux
OSS

Since early 2020, when I wrote about some fun Raspberry Pi projects and our Raspberry Pi eBook, I (like almost everyone) have been living and working from home. While I've been here, taking one day at a time and looking towards a brighter future and a healthier tomorrow, I had the pleasure of ordering and receiving the latest and greatest achievement from the Raspberry Pi Foundation: the Raspberry Pi 400.

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7 Best Free and Open Source Python Data Validation

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Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported.

Programmers and data scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language.

Here’s our recommendations for performing data validation using Python. All of the software is free and open source goodness.

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OpenClinic GA: 500+ worldwide hospital Implementation with ~500 weekly downloads

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OSS

OpenClinic GA is an open-source hospital information management system (HIMS) which covers all aspects of running small and medium-sized hospitals.

The project started back 2010 as a hospital information system by a group of developers, doctors and experienced hospital managers.

It's built as a cross-platform, self-hosted and on-premise system for low-resources hospitals.

For weeks OpenClinic GA is getting hundreds of download hits at Sourceforge.net. This week it gets ~700 downloads so far. Unfortunately, there is no easy way to measure the community and how many users does it have.

The web user interface for OpenClinic GA is working seamlessly on all popular web browsers like Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Opera. However, the user-interface certainly require more work to fit for smaller screens and resolutions.

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Comparing the similarities and differences between inner source and open source

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OSS

Open source software (OSS) has been around since the 1990s and has thrived, quickly growing to become mainstream. It is now more well understood around the world than it has ever been before. Some refer to it as FOSS to highlight the Freedom part of open source (Free and Open Source Software). And in 2014, at OSCON, the term "inner source" was debuted, and people started talking about how to use the principles of open source, but inside of a company. It raised several questions for those unfamiliar with the term, which I hope to answer with this article. For example, what is similar about the two, what is different, the company roles involved in the two, is inner source taking the energy away from open source, etc. These are all fair questions, and as my organization practices both and is involved in both movements, I want to take some time to share insight with this audience as a developer, as a company, and as an open source enthusiast.

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4 questions about AI ethics and how open source can help

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As a high school student, I've become very interested in artificial intelligence (AI), which is emerging as one of the most impactful innovations of recent times. This past summer, I was selected for the AI4ALL program, where we learned how to develop AI systems using Python.

For my final project, I created an object-detection program and integrated it with a virtual drone simulation. Throughout the project, I was able to use open source frameworks, including TensorFlow, Keras, Scikit-learn, and PyTorch, to aid in developing the object-detection machine learning (ML) algorithm process.

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MuditaOS: A Beautiful and Minimal Open Source Mobile Operating System

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OS
OSS

MuditaOS is a beautiful, minimal open-source operating system for mobile phones. Unlike other mobile phone operating systems, however, the developers behind MuditaOS are not interested in smartphones. Instead, they aim to take us to the era before the smartphone craze that has lead to distrust for big tech companies, but with a far cooler style.

Developing this mobile operating system has admittedly been a challenge to the team and they are excited to have come up with a beautifully designed E Ink OS, which they have open-sourced to meet the modern user’s desire for transparency without compromising quality.

When the company developed and open-source the operating system, they announced that open-sourcing the OS goes along the lines of their “You’re happy – I’m Happy” philosophy and this makes even more sense when you understand that Mudita is from the Sanskrit word “Mudit” which translates to ‘Happy‘.

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The Few, the Tired, the Open Source Coders

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Development
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Sometimes open source coders simply walk away: Let someone else deal with this crap. Studies suggest that about 9.5 percent of all open source code is abandoned, and a quarter is probably close to being so. This can be dangerous: If code isn't regularly updated, it risks causing havoc if someone later relies on it. Worse, abandoned code can be hijacked for ill use. Two years ago, the pseudonymous coder right9ctrl took over a piece of open source code that was used by bitcoin firms—and then rewrote it to try to steal cryptocurrency.

No one's quite sure what to do about open source burnout, but some think finding money for the coders might help. Programmer Ashley Williams is a member of the team creating the open source language Rust, and they're trying to set up a foundation to support core contributors, or get firms to keep contributors on staff. (Some of the largest open source projects thrive in precisely this fashion; firms like Facebook or Google pay some employees to work full-time on open source code.) Eghbal thinks subscriptions could offer new ways to pay for the work. Others worry that injecting pay can deform how and why the work is done in the first place.

But we need to rethink the very idea of what crowdsourcing is capable of—and understand that it is perhaps more limited than promised. The open source revolution has been carried on the backs of some very weary people.

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Also: Good News: Academics Can Make Their Articles Published In Top Journal Nature Freely Available As Open Access. Bad News: They Must Pay $11,000 For Each One

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