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OSS

Intel contributes open source NEV and Titanium code to “Akraino” edge computing project

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Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation announced new support for its “Akraino Edge Stack” project for creating open source cloud services for edge computing, including Intel’s promise to open source parts of its Wind River Titanium Cloud and Network Edge Virtualization SDK.

On Feb. 20, the Linux Foundation announced an Akraino Edge Stack open source project built around code contributions from AT&T for carrier-scale edge computing applications. Today, the LF followed up by announcing new support for the initiative, including the contribution by Intel of major components of its Wind River Titanium Cloud portfolio and Intel Network Edge Virtualization Software Development Kit (Intel NEV SDK).

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Linux Foundation and ONF

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OSS

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • How Open Source Development Is Democratizing The Tech Industry
  • New Open-Source Algorithm Achieves Photorealistic Style Transfers

    Every day it seems researchers are solving problems that most of us didn’t realize we had. Now, courtesy Yijun Li, Ph.D. candidate at Cal Merced, and his team at the “Vision and Learning Lab,” we have a solution to “Photorealistic Image Stylization.”

    The team sought to create software which could, when fed two images—one the “content” image, the other the “style” image—project the aesthetic of the latter image onto the content of the former. Thus the content of the first image would remain the same, simply restyled in whatever colors and lighting are found in the “style” reference photo. Further, this was all to be done quickly, and without showing signs that the images had been manipulated. As the team sums it up:

  • Things to be prepared when asking for support

    It is fairly common to see someone drop into an IRC channel, ask a question and then quit 10-20 minutes later if they don't get an answer. [It isn't just IRC, I have seen this on other 'group' chat interfaces.. ] They may randomly jump from channel to channel trying to get anyone to answer their question. It is frustrating for the questioner and for anyone who comes online, writes up an answer and finds the person has left for some other channel right before they hit Enter.

  • Do you speak the same language as the rest of your team?

    A common, shared vocabulary is at the the heart of data quality and data management initiatives, not to mention effective team communication. On top of that, however, an explicit and common language also critical for maintaining a community-centered organizational culture. According to the Open Organization Definition, in the most successful open organizations, "people have a common language and work together to ensure that ideas do not get 'lost in translation,' and they are comfortable sharing their knowledge and stories to further the group's work."

  • How GeoNode spread across the globe

    GeoNode, a free software platform for building and sharing maps, has grown from an experimental project implemented after one disaster, to a public good currently in use in dozens of locations around the globe. The Global Facility for Disaster Resilience and Readiness (GFDRR) contributed to this growth in multiple ways. This session presents an overview of the history of GeoNode as a case study of institutional investment in a free software project. GeoNode has helped people across the world own their own data and respond to disasters.

  • Highlights of the Embedded Linux Conference

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Coreboot Picks Up Librem Enhancements, New HP Elitebook Port, Cheza Snapdragon

    Coreboot is off to a busy start of the week with a number of notable enhancements having been merged to Git this morning.

  • The Apache® Software Foundation Celebrates 19 Years of Open Source Leadership "The Apache Way"

    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today its 19th Anniversary, and its meritocratic, community-driven process known as "The Apache Way" as the key to its success.

    The world's largest Open Source foundation is home to dozens of freely-available (no cost), enterprise-grade Apache projects that serve as the backbone for some of the most visible and widely used applications in Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning, Big Data, Build Management, Cloud Computing, Content Management, DevOps, IoT and Edge Computing, Mobile, Servers, and Web Frameworks, among many other categories.

  • McHardy withdraws injunction request - Is this a victory for open source?

    When Cologne Regional Court issued an injunction in October 2017 (case no. 14 O 188/17) it should have been clear that infringing licence conditions for open source software carries dramatic consequences. Then at the oral appeal hearing before the Cologne Higher Regional Court on 7 March 2018, the claimant, software developer Patrick McHardy, withdrew a request for an interim injunction, which was issued in the first instance to avoid a decision with negative implications for him.

    [...]

    Despite this partial victory, the basic question of how to achieve sufficient open source compliance still remains. Even in the case presented here, the claimant can still initiate main proceedings and prove alleged co-authorship through further submissions and expert evidence. Complaints about a lack of open source compliance are increasing as well.

    For some time now, the open source community has been critical of this claimant’s approach. The community prefers to take enforcement of open source licences into its own hands, and has previously taken action against licence infringements. Since no applications today are developed without open source software, compliance with licence conditions is becoming increasingly important. We advise the use of standardised analysis methods, and to develop appropriate compliance guidelines. Many companies have already created this capacity in their organisations.

  • 10 Best Programming, Scripting, and Markup Languages To Learn In 2018

    2016 was the year when Apple’s homegrown programming language Swift made waves and started growing at a fast pace. In 2017, Kotlin made similar strides after Google announced the official support for Android. Overall, it means that trends keep changing each year and the developers should adapt themselves accordingly.

    Just earlier this month, a report from HackerRank focused on the shrinking gender gap in tech and helped us gain more insights into the programming language priorities of female coders. But, what about the overall popular and best programming languages?

Latest on ONF

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OSS
  • The Evolution of Open Networking to Automated, Intelligent Networks

    The 2018 Open Networking Summit is happening this week in Los Angeles. Just prior to opening day, we talked with John Zannos, Chief Revenue Officer at Inocybe, to get his view on the state of open networking and changes in the foreseeable future. Zannos, is on the governing board of the Linux Foundation Networking effort, and has formerly served on the OpenStack and on the OPEN-O boards.

    Inocybe has been involved with OpenDaylight since the beginning. The company is one of the top five contributors, and its engineering team is involved in helping solve some of the toughest questions associated with SDN and OpenDaylight. For example, company engineers lead the community effort focused on solving the problems associated with clustering, security, and service function chaining.

  • ONF isn’t waiting around for traditional OEMs to get their open source act together

    The industry’s traditional big infrastructure vendors aren’t exactly playing ball when it comes to what a group of leading operators are looking for, so they’re taking it upon themselves to create a new supply chain around open source and next-gen networks.

    Those operators include AT&T, China Unicom, Comcast, Google, Deutsche Telekom, NTT Group, Telefonica and Turk Telecom, all of which are partners in the Open Networking Foundation (ONF), which today announced a new strategic plan for the ONF to move open source, next-generation SDN solutions into production mode.

How to create an open source stack using EFK

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OSS

Managing an infrastructure of servers is a non-trivial task. When one cluster is misbehaving, logging in to multiple servers, checking each log, and using multiple filters until you find the culprit is not an efficient use of resources.

The first step to improve the methods that handle your infrastructure or applications is to implement a centralized logging system. This will enable you to gather logs from any application or system into a centralized location and filter, aggregate, compare, and analyze them. If there are servers or applications, there should be a unified logging layer.

Thankfully, we have an open source stack to simplify this. With the combination of Elasticsearch, Fluentd, and Kibana (EFK), we can create a powerful stack to collect, store, and visualize data in a centralized location.

Let’s start by defining each component to get the big picture. Elasticsearch is an open source distributed, RESTful search and analytics engine, or simply an object store where all logs are stored. Fluentd is an open source data collector that lets you unify the data collection and consumption for better use and understanding of data. And finally, Kibana is a web UI for Elasticsearch.

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Keep the IoT Free (Patent Battles Not Welcome)

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OSS
Legal

While it has experienced nearly exponential growth, the successful adoption and use of open-source by banking networks, mobile phone manufacturers, telecom networks, smart cars, cloud computing and blockchain platforms, among numerous others, was not a foregone conclusion. In 2003, there was an IP-based attack on Linux, the most prevalent open-source software project.

While the claims underlying the litigation ultimately were found to be without merit in the court proceeding, it was a wake-up call to several IP-savvy companies as to the potential negative impact of patent aggression on the growth of Linux and open source software projects. IBM, Red Hat and SUSE (then Novell) coordinated an effort with Sony, Philips and NEC to conceptualize and implement a solution designed to create a patent no-fly zone around the core of Linux.

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Linus Torvalds Remembers the Days Before ‘Open Source’

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GNU
OSS

Advocating fiercely for the term free software was Richard Stallman, who notes that the free software movement began in 1983, and argues that “In 1998, a part of the free software community splintered off and began campaigning in the name of ‘open source’…”

“The two terms describe almost the same category of software, but they stand for views based on fundamentally different values. Open source is a development methodology; free software is a social movement. For the free software movement, free software is an ethical imperative, essential respect for the users’ freedom. By contrast, the philosophy of open source considers issues in terms of how to make software ‘better’ — in a practical sense only… Most discussion of ‘open source’ pays no attention to right and wrong, only to popularity and success.”

In the 2001 documentary “RevolutionOS,” Eric Raymond counters that the problem with the phrase “free software” is the connotations it brings up for business executives.

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​FOSSA: Open-sourcing open-source license management

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OSS
Legal

Kevin Wang, CEO of FOSSA, has a different approach. The 22-year-old founder told me at Open Source Leadership Summit in Sonoma, CA: "Code scanning is not enough anymore. FOSSA's approach to dependency scanning leverages both static and dynamic code analysis. Dynamic analysis allows FOSSA to get an accurate, live view of what dependencies are pulled into builds. Static analysis supplements the results with metadata on how dependencies are included to power deep intelligence features and recommendation engines. Both these approaches are used to build the most accurate, performant, and intelligent infrastructure for managing your open source."

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Android/ChromeOS/Google Leftovers

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Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more