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OSS

Matt Asay: Is there money in them thar open source hills?

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Will people pay seven figures-plus for open source? Of course. Just ask SugarCRM, Red Hat, JBoss, or MySQL. Open source does not equal poverty; open source equals massive opportunity. Five years from now, no one will bother selling proprietary bits anymore.

Open Source, Linux, marketing and public perception

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Anyone could have guessed that my undergrad thesis work is centered on Open Source; more accurately, we deal with devising strategies for Linux and Open Source adoption and penetration growth in the SMB sector of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Most of the conclusions are not Earth-shattering revelations, but things we already know. But there’s one particular thing you and me know for certain… yet we’re doing practically nothing about it!

Open source software takes on giants

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Free and open source software is fast taking on licenced software giants worldover, and in India too, it is catching the fancy of IT industry.

Analyst Firm Gets It Half-Right

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IDC, a well-known analyst firm has just released a study on the topic of open source, concluding that open source represents "the most significant all-encompassing and long-term trend that the software industry has seen since the early 1980s."

Lonelygirl15 Creators Rely On Open Source

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Creators behind the Internet video phenomenon Lonelygirl15 will rely on open source technology and a "newly launched Web site to explore possibilities in storytelling.

OSDL patent project 'worse than nothing'

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Analysis: A project to fight low-quality software patents in the US could make the legal terrain more difficult for open source, according to FSF founder Richard Stallman

Copyright, bad faith, and software licensing

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Robin Miller recently published a story on Newsforge about "Stan"[1], as an example of a situation that demonstrates proprietary software is a danger to business continuity. I found this story interesting since I think Mr. Miller came close to correctly identifying a core issue.

Open source unlocks options for many small-to-medium sized businesses

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When Tony Losey came to the 3Sixty Group in 2003 he saw that, like many small companies, the manufacturing firm didn’t have much in the way of advanced systems. The organization didn’t have a lot of money to throw at IT, but Losey zeroed in on open source as the key to keeping the company competitive.

I’ll make you free if I have to lock you up!

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Interesting goings-on over on the Busybox list. Busybox is a single app that masquerades as a large set of common unix tools like ls, a shell and so on. The maintainer is planning to, well, sort of migrate the project to being GPL v2-only. The issue is significant, because in the current GPL3 drafts there is language that would require any signing keys to be given up with the sources.

Open source community welcomes Microsoft patent pledge

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Long-time Microsoft enemies are taking a positive stance on the vendor's latest pledge not to assert its patent portfolio against a group of 38 web services specifications and their implementations.

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More in Tux Machines

A look at Lutris – Open Gaming Platform for GNU/Linux

Lutris is quite the handy application I’ve discovered, that helps with organization and installation of games on GNU/Linux, even if they come from multiple sources. One of the project's goals is to support any game that runs on Linux regardless of whether it runs natively, through Wine, or other means. The main appeal of Lutris is that it provides an interface to manage all games installed on the machine regardless of source. While it is necessary to integrate the games in the application first, doing so is not super complicated. You may add local games right away by selecting them from the local system or visit the Lutris website to add games this way. Lutris simplifies nearly everything. Users can visit the list of support games on the Lutris website, choose to download and install the game (Note: If its a game that must be bought, you must own it first.) The website lists supported games and where you can acquire or download them. You can use filters on the site to display only free games, games of a genre, or use the built-in search to find games of interest quickly using it. Read more

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.