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FOSS and Oracle

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OSS
  • Oracle Joins CNCF, and Releases Kubernetes on Oracle Linux and Terraform Kubernetes Cloud Installer

    At the Open Source Summit, held in Los Angeles, USA, it was announced that Oracle have joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a Platinum member. Oracle have also released two technologies for installing Kubernetes on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure: "Kubernetes on Oracle Linux", an integration of Kubernetes into the Oracle Container Service; and an open source HashiCorp Terraform Kubernetes Installer for the Oracle Bare Metal Cloud. This news follows from the July release of three open source container tools by Oracle, which included a Rust-based alternative container runtime that implements the OCI-runtime specification

  • Oracle Joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
  • Java EE Finds Open Source Home

    Oracle announced this week it would turn over Java Enterprise Edition to the Eclipse Foundation, a nonprofit corporation formed in 2004 and an outgrowth of a software project originally created by IBM in 2001. The company said its decision resulted from consultations with IBM and Red Hat, the other key contributors to the Java EE platform.

  • Get out your specs: Java EE's headed to the Eclipse Foundation

    Oracle has named the Eclipse Foundation as the new host for Java Enterprise Edition, but said the platform won’t get to keep its name.

    The decision to make Java EE - which is already developed in open source - fully open was announced last month, with Oracle’s David Delabassee saying it was in a bid to make it “more agile and responsive”.

  • Oracle Punts Java EE To The Eclipse Foundation

    Since last month's announcement by Oracle that they were essentially looking to offload Java EE to a new foundation, that new steward has now been named.

Databases: Oracle in Cloud Native Computing Foundation, New dbKoda Release

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Server
OSS
  • Oracle joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation, adds new container services

    As the excitement around software containers reaches fever pitch, database software giant Oracle Corp. is throwing its weight behind the cause.

    The company said Wednesday it’s signing up as a platinum member of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, the organization leading the development of the Kubernetes container orchestrator tool. In addition, the company has just made Kubernetes available on its Oracle Linux platform, and will also open-source a Terraform Kubernetes Installer for its cloud infrastructure.

  • Oracle Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation as Platinum Member
  • dbKoda 0.7.0 new features

    0.7.0 is the second public release of dbKoda and our first post-MVP release. With the MVP (Minimal Viable Product) we definitely nailed the “M” criteria, and in this release we’ve pushing harder on the “V” side of the equation.

  • Southbank Software Introduces dbKoda, an Open Source Database Development Tool for MongoDB

    Southbank Software recently released its initial offering of dbKoda version 0.6.0, an open source MongoDB development tool packaged with JavaScript, React and Electron. As shown below, dbKoda’s graghical user interface features a connection manager and a feature-rich code editor for working with MongoDB databases.

Openwashing VMworld, Amdocs, VCV, and Microsoft

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OSS

OSS: Networking, Wipro, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and FOSS in Government

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OSS
  • New network demands push adoption of open-source networking solutions

    Networking makes the modern connected world possible. Yet as networking has become more important, new technologies must rise to shoulder the burden. Businesses at all levels are discovering that open-source networking can provide the solutions they need.

    “I can confidently say that open-source networking, not just networking but open-source networking, is now mainstream,” said Arpit Joshipura (pictured), general manager of networking and orchestration at The Linux Foundation.

  • Richard Morrell: a brief history (of life) in open source

    I worked with Red Hat until the end of last year and am now at Falanx in the UK – a firm building possibly the fastest and most intelligent security platform to ever emerge from the open source community.

  • Wipro Joins Hyperledger to Catalyze Collaboration on Enterprise-Grade Blockchain Solutions
  • Wipro partners with open source blockchain project Hyperledger

    Wipro Limited said today that it will partner with an open source project Hyperledger to design and develop open source-based blockchain solutions for enterprise-grade blockchain deployments.

    Hyperledger is a global open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies across sectors such as finance, banking, Internet of Things, supply chain, manufacturing and technology.

    “We are excited to welcome Wipro to the Hyperledger community. Wipro brings industry-acknowledged blockchain advisory and consulting capabilities, coupled with industry solutions for specific use cases and a strong partner ecosystem to help client businesses innovate on blockchain. We look forward to Wipro’s active contribution in the Hyperledger community to share insights on blockchain use cases, technology frameworks, tools and standards, and thought leadership,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger in a statement.

  • Government lab that gives a crap pushes open source

    The US government wants you to use its software, and if you're into manure, so much the better.

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), part of the US Department of Energy, last week released a new round of open-source projects in the hope that the public will take its research and run with it.

    Known for its MOOSE physics modeling software and a companion project for continuous integration and testing called CIVET, INL last year brought Paul Berg over from Amazon to serve as the lab's senior R&D software licensing manager. His remit is to oversee the handling of open-source projects.

    When Berg spoke to The Register earlier this year, he said the lab was preparing to make a number of its projects available to the public. And now the floodgates have opened.

  • Software Paid For With Public Money Should Be Open Source, Groups Say

    Publicly financed software should be open source, more than 30 signatories of an open letter are proclaiming, calling for others to sign the letter.

    According to a press release from the European Digital Rights initiative (EDRi), the 31 organisations and 469 people who signed the open letter want legislation requiring that publicly financed software developed for the public sector be made publicly available under a free and open source software licence.

    “If it is public money, it should be public code as well,” it says.

    “We need software that guarantees freedom of choice, access, and competition. We need software that helps public administrations regain full control of their critical digital infrastructure, allowing them to become and remain independent from a handful of companies,” the release says.

6 Best Free And Open Source Reddit Alternatives You Must Visit

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OSS

Just recently, Reddit announced its plans to stop sharing its main website’s open source code base. The website gave a number of reasons, which weren’t welcomed by the open source community. So, we’ve decided to prepare a list of some free and open source Reddit alternatives that you can give a try. Some of these aren’t much popular, but we thought it’s a good time to spread the world and tell you about these options.

Read more

Why open source developers are burning out: No respect

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OSS

It takes money—a whole lot of money—to make open source work, but it takes recognition and appreciation to make an open source developer happy.

As it turns out, maintaining good open source code is difficult. Just ask James Coglan, who disgorged a litany of reasons why releasing code can take forever. Oh, and without much hope of empathy in return. Or ask Isaac Schlueter, CEO of npm, who agonized over the burden of maintaining code for entitled downstream users who "don't love me."

As people, we want to be recognized for the good work we do. Open source, however, often tends to maximize negative feedback loops, contributing to developer burnout, as Schlueter highlighted.

Read more

Uber, Lyft, and CNCF

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS
  • Uber and Lyft Bring Open-Source Cloud Projects to CNCF

    In the market for ride sharing services, Uber and Lyft are fierce competitors, the world of open-source however is another story. At the Open Source Summit here on Sept. 13, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced that it had accepted two new projects, Envoy from Lyft and Jaeger from Uber.

  • ​Lyft and Uber travel the same open-source road

    Coke and Pepsi, Gimbels and Macy's, Apple and Microsoft -- these were all great business rivals. Today, we have Lyft and Uber fighting tooth and nail over the new ride-sharing market. While they may be bitter rivals on the highways, the pair can agree on one thing: Open source is the best way to develop software.

    At The Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, both companies appeared -- but not at the same time -- to announce they were launching two new cloud-native, open-source software projects with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

  • Ride-hailing firms Lyft and Uber open-source microservices technology

    Ride-hailing companies Lyft Inc. and Uber Technologies Inc. are embracing the open-source software movement.

    The two megastartups have both donated technologies developed in-house to the Cloud Native Computing Federation, which is best known for hosting the Kubernetes container orchestrator project.

OSS: New FSFE Campaign, Fuchsia OS Magenta Becomes Zircon, Data Science, Mozilla, Oracle, and VCV

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OSS
  • Public Money? Public Code! - Join the FSFE Campaign

    Public institutions spend millions of Euros every year for the development of new software that is specifically tailored to their needs.

    Unfortunately, most of this software is closed source.

    This means that your tax money is being used to pay for software that cannot be modified or even studied. Most public institutions pay to develop programs that they do not or cannot release to the public. When other institutions need to solve similar problems, they have to develop the same software again. And each time the public - including you - has to foot the bill.

  • Google's Fuchsia OS Magenta Becomes Zircon

    For those looking to follow the development of Google's Fuchsia operating system that is written from scratch, it's low-level Magenta core has been renamed to Zircon.

    As a reminder, Fuchsia is a (non-Linux) real-time operating system developed by Google that has been under much public speculation since its code began appearing last year. Fuchsia uses a micro-kernel design with it being called Magenta.

  • How to become a data scientist

    Once upon a time, I wanted to be an evolutionary biologist. To make a long story short, I had a change of heart and dropped out of my PhD program to pursue a career in computer science. I'm now a senior software engineer at Red Hat, where I work on a variety of machine learning and data science projects (you can read more about my journey on my blog). Not long after joining Red Hat, many people—including three different University of Chicago grad students—asked me about transitioning to a career in data science, so I started looking into it.

  • Mozilla Announces 15 New Fellows for Science, Advocacy, and Media

    Today, Mozilla is announcing 15 new Fellows in the realms of science, advocacy, and media.

    Fellows hail from Mexico, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Uganda, the United States, and beyond. They are multimedia artists and policy analysts, security researchers and ethical hackers.

    Over the next several months, Fellows will put their diverse abilities to work making the Internet a healthier place. Among their many projects are initiatives to make biomedical research more open; uncover technical solutions to online harassment; teach privacy and security fundamentals to patrons at public libraries; and curtail mass surveillance within Latin American countries.

  • Oracle prepares to spin off Java EE to Eclipse Foundation

    Oracle is continuing to free up Java Enterprise Edition (EE), Java's enterprise middleware platform, from its once iron-grip. In a blog post, Oracle Software Evangelist David Delabassee said, "After careful review, we have selected the Eclipse Foundation."

    Oracle has recently admitted that "although Java EE is developed in open source with the participation of the Java EE community, often the process is not seen as being agile, flexible, or open enough, particularly when compared to other open-source communities. We'd like to do better."

  • VCV Rack is an open-source virtual modular synth you can download for free
  • VMware Charges Into OpenStack VIM Market
  • Seeking investment, Alaska goes open source with oil & gas data

    Under this program, the state released its first two data sets in 2016.  One set included a 3-D seismic survey from the North Slope that covered a huge chunk of ground near Prudhoe Bay. And the state saw a burst of activity, requests from university researchers, companies, and contractors.

    And even getting the data that is open to the public is still vaguely super-spy-ish. Acting Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources Steve Masterman says they ask people to provide a brand new hard drive, still in the wrapper.

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Blockchain and the Web Are Coming Together, Says Berners-Lee

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Control Or Consensus?

In a recent conversation on the Apache Legal mailing list, a participant opined that “any license can be Open Source. OSI doesn’t ‘own’ the term.” He went on to explain “I could clone the Apache License and call it ‘Greg’s License’ and it would be an open source license.” As long as the only people involved in the conversation are the speaker and people who defer to his authority, this might be OK. But as soon as there are others involved, it’s not. For the vast majority of people, the term “open source license” is not a personal conclusion resulting from considered evaluation, but rather a term of art applied to the consensus of the community. Individuals are obviously free to use words however they wish, just like Humpty Dumpty. But the power of the open source movement over two decades has arisen from a different approach. The world before open source left every developer to make their own decision about whether software was under a license that delivers the liberty to use, improve and share code without seeking the permission of a rights holder. Inevitably that meant either uncertainty or seeking advice from a lawyer about the presence of software freedom. The introduction of the open source concept around the turn of the millennium solved that using the crystalisation of consensus to empower developers. By holding a public discussion of each license around the Open Source Definition, a consensus emerged that could then by crystalised by the OSI Board. Once crystalised into “OSI Approval”, the community then has no need to revisit the discussion and the individual developer has no need to guess (or to buy advice) on the compatibility of a given license with software freedom. That in turn means proceeding with innovation or deployment without delay. Read more

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