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OSS

7 Open-Source Serverless Frameworks Providing Functions as a Service

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OSS

With virtualization, organizations began to realize greater utilization from physical hardware. That trend continued with the cloud, as organization began to get their virtual machines in a pay-as-you-go service.

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OSS and Programming Leftovers

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Development
OSS
  • Telecommunications Infrastructure Project looks to apply open source technologies

    The Telecommunications Infrastructure Project is looking to apply open source technologies to next generation fixed and mobile networks.

    The Telecom Infra Project (TIP), conceived by Facebook to light a fire under the traditional telecommunications infrastructure market, continues to expand into new areas.

    Launched at the 2016 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the highly disruptive project takes an open ecosystem approach to foster network innovation and improve the cost efficiencies of both equipment suppliers and network operators.“We know from our experience with the Open Compute Project that the best way to accelerate the pace of innovation is for companies to collaborate and work in the open. We helped to found TIP with the same goal - bringing different parties together and strengthen and improve efficiencies in the telecom industry,” according to Aaron Bernstein, Director of Connectivity Ecosystem Programmmes at Facebook.

  • Introducing Ad Inspector: Our open-source ad inspection tool
  • AI and machine learning bias has dangerous implications

    Algorithms are everywhere in our world, and so is bias. From social media news feeds to streaming service recommendations to online shopping, computer algorithms—specifically, machine learning algorithms—have permeated our day-to-day world. As for bias, we need only examine the 2016 American election to understand how deeply—both implicitly and explicitly—it permeates our society as well.

    What’s often overlooked, however, is the intersection between these two: bias in computer algorithms themselves.

    Contrary to what many of us might think, technology is not objective. AI algorithms and their decision-making processes are directly shaped by those who build them—what code they write, what data they use to “train” the machine learning models, and how they stress-test the models after they’re finished. This means that the programmers’ values, biases, and human flaws are reflected in the software. If I fed an image-recognition algorithm the faces of only white researchers in my lab, for instance, it wouldn’t recognize non-white faces as human. Such a conclusion isn’t the result of a “stupid” or “unsophisticated” AI, but to a bias in training data: a lack of diverse faces. This has dangerous consequences.

  • Pineapple Fund Supports Conservancy

    Software Freedom Conservancy thanks the Pineapple Fund and its anonymous backer for its recent donation of over 18 Bitcoin (approximately $250,000). The Pineapple Fund is run by an early Bitcoin adopter to give about $86 million worth of Bitcoin to various charities. Shortly after the fund’s announcement earlier this month, volunteers and Conservancy staff members applied for its support. That application was granted this week.

  • Top Programming Languages That Largest Companies Are Hiring Developers For In 2018

    Learning a programming language involves some important decisions on the part of a professional. Gone are the days when one mastered a single popular programming language and it granted job security. Highlighting these limitations of reliance on a single programming language, Coding Dojo coding school has shared the results of an interesting study.

  • Rust in 2018

    I think 2017 was a great year for Rust. Near the beginning of the year, after custom derive and a bunch of things stabilized, I had a strong feeling that Rust was “complete”. Not really “finished”, there’s still tons of stuff to improve, but this was the first time stable Rust was the language I wanted it to be, and was something I could recommend for most kinds of work without reservations.

    I think this is a good signal to wind down the frightening pace of new features Rust has been getting. And that happened! We had the impl period, which took some time to focus on getting things done before proposing new things. And Rust is feeling more polished than ever.

FUD Firms Versus Free Software (Licensing, Security, Gender)

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OSS Leftovers

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  • Why isn't open source hot among computer science students?

    The technical savvy and inventive energy of young programmers is alive and well.

    This was clear from the diligent work that I witnessed while participating in this year’s PennApps, the nation’s largest college hackathon. Over the course of 48 hours, my high school- and college-age peers created projects ranging from a blink-based communication device for shut-in patients to a burrito maker with IoT connectivity. The spirit of open source was tangible throughout the event, as diverse groups bonded over a mutual desire to build, the free flow of ideas and tech know-how, fearless experimentation and rapid prototyping, and an overwhelming eagerness to participate.

    Why then, I wondered, wasn’t open source a hot topic among my tech geek peers?

    To learn more about what college students think when they hear "open source," I surveyed several college students who are members of the same professional computer science organization I belong to. All members of this community must apply during high school or college and are selected based on their computer science-specific achievements and leadership—whether that means leading a school robotics team, founding a nonprofit to bring coding into insufficiently funded classrooms, or some other worthy endeavor. Given these individuals’ accomplishments in computer science, I thought that their perspectives would help in understanding what young programmers find appealing (or unappealing) about open source projects.

  • Blue Brain Nexus: An open-source knowledge graph for data-driven science

    EPFL's Blue Brain Project today announces the release of its open source software project 'Blue Brain Nexus', designed to enable the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) data management principles for the Neuroscience and broader scientific community. It is part of EPFL's open-science initiative, which seeks to maximize the reach and impact of research conducted at the school.

    The aim of the Blue Brain Project is to build accurate, biologically detailed, digital reconstructions and simulations of the rodent brain and, ultimately the human brain. Blue Brain Nexus is instrumental in supporting all stages of Blue Brain's data-driven modelling cycle including, but not limited to experimental data, single cell models, circuits, simulations and validations. The brain is a complex multi-level system and is one of the biggest 'Big Data' problems we have today. Therefore, Blue Brain Nexus has been built to organize, store and process exceptionally large volumes of data and support usage by a broad number of users.

  • Devery.io – a Blockchain Powered, Open-Source, Product Verification Protocol

    Devery.io are developing the Devery Protocol, aiming to provide a decentralized verification platform enabling the marking and tracking of items over the Ethereum blockchain.

  • What the Haven app shows us about the value of Open Source

    Christmas may have come a few days early this past December for security advocates with the introduction of the Haven app, bringing with it a fair amount of excitement, criticism, and an excellent opportunity to explore some of the less often discussed aspects of working with open source.

    For those who have been off of Twitter since the coverage started since Friday, the Haven app has been proposed as a solution for protecting your physical space from surveillance (or worse). Built for Android by the good folks over at the Guardian Project, the makers of great anonymity apps that help protect their users from surveillance, the app makes use of the phone’s sensors to detect intruders that might attempt to creep on your personal space.

  • Jet Villegas: Turning a Corner in the New Year

    2017 was quite a year beyond the socio-economic, geo-political, and bizarre. I, and many of my colleagues did what we could: find solace in work. I’ve often found that in uncertain times, making forward progress on difficult technical projects provides just enough incentive to continue for a bit longer. With the successful release of Firefox 57, I’m again optimistic about the future for the technical work. The Firefox Layout Engine team has a lot to be proud of in the 57 version. The winning combination was shipping big-ticket investments, and grinding down on many very difficult bugs. Plan “A” all the way!

  • Facebook has open-sourced encrypted group chat

    Facebook has responded to governments' criticism of cryptography by giving the world an open source encrypted group chat tool.

    It's hardly likely to endear the ad-farm to people like FBI Director Christopher Wray, who yesterday told an international infosec conference it was “ridiculous” that the Feds have seized nearly 8,000 phones they can't access. UK prime minister Theresa May has also called for backdoors in messaging services and for social networks to stop offering "safe spaces" for extremists.

  • Open source code recycling: Know your software supply chain

    GNU/Linux was able to fill this gap, truly reshaping software design and development. Rather than writing and updating proprietary, foundational code, various developers working at varying companies or on their own could use and enhance the basic software building blocks, thereby focusing the majority of their resources on higher stack-level innovations.

    And, it worked.

Oath’s Top 5 Open Source Goals

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OSS

For seven years and counting, Gil Yehuda, Senior Director of Open Source at Oath Inc. (which owns the Yahoo and AOL brands), has led the open source program at Yahoo. Now with an expanded scope, he is gearing up to grow his team and improve the program. The company’s formal open source program office serves as a hub to connect all open source activities across the company, he says, but it didn’t start out that way.

As with many other companies, the open source program started informally with a group of diligent engineers and a few legal people. But the ad hoc group soon realized it needed a more formal program if it was going to be able to scale to address more issues and achieve specific business goals. With a formal program in place, they are poised to achieve its goals.

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Top 5 Open Source Firewalls for Business

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OSS

Whether it be for home or for your workplace, chances are you've encountered an open source firewall. And if you haven't, you really should check out what these open source firewalls have to offer. In this article, I'll share the open source firewalls I've admired, used in the past and heard good things about. Keep in mind that the needs of your workplace may vary, so be sure to review the features of each firewall solution carefully.

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OSS leftovers

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OSS

IPFire Open Source Firewall Linux Distro Gets Huge Number of Security Fixes

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Linux
OSS
Security

IPFire 2.19 Core Update 117 is now available to download and comes with the latest OpenSSL 1.0.2n TLS/SSL and crypto library, as well as an updated OpenVPN implementation that makes it easier to route OpenVPN Roadwarrior Clients to IPsec VPN networks by allowing users to choose routes in each client’s configuration.

The update also improves the IPsec implementation by allowing users to define the inactivity timeout time of an idle IPsec VPN tunnel that's being closed and updating the strongSwan IPsec-based VPN solution to version 5.6.1. It also disabled the compression by default and removed support for MODP groups with subgroups.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Rethinking your open source use policy

    I spoke with someone the other day that was fired from his job as a technical product manager after more than 20 years of experience. He is now job-searching but is finding it difficult. There is a new bar set for speed of technology development that capitalizes on agile software development practices and leveraging open source technologies—two things that were not taken seriously just ten years ago. According to 69 percent of senior executives, this digital transformation is forcing us now to rethink our cybersecurity strategies.

    To accommodate these time constraints from management, developers have turned more and more to open source code as a great asset to build products and features, as opposed to writing code from scratch.  Open source technologies are available openly on the internet through sites like GitHub and SourceForge. Open source code now makes up 90 percent of the code composition of our modern applications.

  • New-Age Networking Predictions for the New Year: Open Source

    As software-defined networking (SDN), network functions virtualization (NFV) and other new-age networking initiatives mature, we'll be taking a look at what's in store for some of the most promising projects in the new year, now examining the open source movement.

    Modern networking techniques such as SDN and NFV are closely tied to the open source phenomenon. As they've originated, evolved and matured, such approaches naturally have gravitated to open source, which itself is in the midst of a rising popularity trend.

  • What is Lisa OS, the legendary operating system by Apple to be released for free

    The Computer History Museum in California has decided to go ahead and release the Apple’s legendary Lisa operating system for free. The OS will now be available as open source for everyone. However, even back in 1983, Apple had a reputation being forward with its product. The tech giant announced Lisa desktop computer on January 19, 1983. Officially, “Lisa” stood for “Local Integrated Software Architecture”, however, there are multiple reports that state that the name of the OS was also the name of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs’ daughter.

  • Lisa OS: Steve Jobs' rare failed project to be released for free as open source
  • FOSDEM 2018 talk: Perl in the Physics Lab

    FOSDEM 2018, the "Free and Open Source Developers' European Meeting", takes place 3-4 February at Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Solbosch, Brussels - and our measurement control software Lab::Measurement will be presented there in the Perl devrooom! As all of FOSDEM, the talk will also be streamed live and archived; more details on this follow later.

The Openwashing of AT&T (Sponsored) and Monsanto

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More in Tux Machines

Open source COM runs mainline Linux on Microchip SAMA5D2 SiP

Microchip unveiled an open source, mainline Linux ready “SAMA5D27 SOM” module based on a SiP implementation of its Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D27 SoC with 128MB RAM. The 40 x 38mm module is also available with a SOM1-EK1 dev board. Long before it was acquired by Microchip Technology, Atmel has been producing a line of Linux-focused, Cortex-A5 based SAMA5 SoCs, but the only Atmel-branded SAMA5 boards were its open-spec Xplained development boards developed with Newark Element14. The SAMA5 family was always a side business to Atmel’s MCU line, with very little integration between the two. With its ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 (SAMA5D27 SOM1) module, which uses a system-in-package (SiP) implementation of Microchip’s SAMA5D27 SoC, Microchip is starting to bridge the gap between the SAMA5 product line and its much larger RTOS/MCU business. Read more

Purism's Linux Phone to Use Convergence for a Unified Experience Across Devices

For Purism, the company that sells quality computers using a Linux-based operating system and are intended to protect user's privacy and freedom, designing a convergent Linux phone is a long-term goal to unify the mobile experience across various devices. Purism's François Téchené shares some initial details on how the company plans to use convergence for their short and long-term design goals of Librem 5, the Linux smartphone that raised more than $2 million on Kickstarter last year, saying they're looking to unify the human experience across different device you might own. Read more

Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts
    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.
  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications
    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations. What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.
  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge
    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.
  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released
    Based on Slackware64-current Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers :-)
  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Security: Updates, Nintendo 'Hackers', Microsoft Windows Back Doors, and FlightSimLabs Malware

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Hackers Release Video Of Nintendo Switch Running A Linux Distro
    When it comes to porting software to potentially unsupported devices, hackers are quite comfortable to push themselves beyond the boundaries set by the manufactures.
  • Epidemic of cryptojacking can be traced to escaped NSA superweapon [Ed: It's a Microsoft Windows issue. All versions of Windows (ME onwards) have NSA back doors]
    It all started when the Shadow Brokers dumped a collection of NSA cyberweapons that the NSA had fashioned from unreported bugs in commonly used software, including versions of Windows. The NSA discovered these bugs and then hoarded them, rather than warning the public and/or the manufacturers about them, in order to develop weapons that turned these bugs into attacks that could be used against the NSA's enemies.
  • Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

    Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.