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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Tips for non-native English speakers working on open source projects

    The primary language of most open source projects is English, but open source users and contributors span the globe. Non-native speakers face many communication and cultural challenges when participating in the ecosystem.

    In this article, we will share challenges, how to overcome them, and best practices for easing onboarding of non-native speakers, as non-native English speakers and contributors to OpenStack. We are based in Japan, Brazil, and China, and work daily with the huge OpenStack community that is spread around the world.

    The official language of OpenStack is English, which means we communicate daily as non-native speakers.

  • How companies can help employees contribute to open source

    I'm a part of the Drupal community, which has more than 100,000 active contributors worldwide. And among them is a growing group of employees who are encouraged by their employers to contribute to open source.

    These days, finding a seasoned developer whose resume or CV doesn't mention an open source contributionor two (or more) is rare. The best developers know it matters, and it's becoming normal for contributions to help you get, or keep, a job. If you're an employer in technology, you know that. So how can you help your employees contribute to open source?

  • Open Networking Summit Returns With New and Enhanced Format for 2017; Call for Proposals Closes Jan 21
  • Report Notes OpenStack Gaining Traction with Telcos, and In Europe

    The OpenStack cloud computing platform is evolving in a number of notable new directions, notes Forrester's report OpenStack's Global Traction Expands For Its Newton Release. In particular, the report notes that OpenStack is gaining traction as a public cloud solution, and much of that trend is playing out in Europe. Additionally, telcos are flocking to OpenStack, says Forrester.

    Here are more details.

    “In the past year, telcos like CableLabs, SK Telecom, and Verizon have shelved their previous objections to the Neutron networking project and flocked to the OpenStack community, contributing features like Doctor,” notes the report. “Leading infrastructure & operations (I&O) professionals, application developers, and CIOs at firms like American Express, Disney, and Walmart have embraced OpenStack for their digital businesses. It’s the foundation of many private (and, increasingly, of many public) cloud services that give your company the agility it needs to respond to customer demand, from core systems to the mobile apps that deliver differentiated customer experiences.”

  • Mirantis to Support and Manage OpenContrail SDN

    In 2016, the SDN (Software Defined Networking) category rapidly evolved, and it also became meaningful to many organizations with OpenStack deployments. IDC published a study of the SDN market earlier this year and predicted a 53.9% CAGR from 2014 through 2020, at which point the market will be valued at $12.5 billion. In addition, the Technology Trends 2016 report ranked SDN as the best technology investment for 2016.

  • Why open source seeds could be vital for the future of food

    Open source, a movement most commonly associated with tech, coding and hacking, is now becoming an increasingly important issue for food according to a recent article published on Ensia and GreenBiz. It might be somewhat surprising, for example, to learn that more than one-third of all carrot growing material has been patented and is protected by intellectual property rights (IPs). This raises a host of new challenges for small scale, independent breeders, who are responding by endorsing an “open source movement for seeds”, and could become a critical topic for those advocating a vision for a regenerative, more distributed food system with greater resilience designed in.

  • D-Wave goes public with open-source quantum-classical hybrid software
  • D-Wave Just Open-Sourced Quantum Computing
  • D-Wave Releases Open Quantum Software Environment
  • D-Wave open sources quantum software development tool qbsolv
  • At Last, An Open Source Electric Vehicle From A Major Manufacturer

    There is a rule of thumb to follow when looking at product announcements at the fringes of the motor industry that probably has something in common with crowdfunding campaigns. If the photographs of the product are all renders rather than real prototypes, walk away. It is said that small volume vehicle production is a space that attracts either crooks or dreamers, and parting with your money to either can be a risky business. So when yet another electric vehicle platform makes its debut it’s always worth looking, but too often the rendered images outnumber anything from the real world and you know you’ll never see one on the road.

  • REMINDER - MEDIA ALERT: ESD Alliance to Host Discussion on Open Source, RISC-V Processor
  • After Lawsuits And Denial, PaceMaker Vendor Finally Admits Its Product Is Hackable

    So we've noted how the lack of security in the Internet of Things is a bit of a problem. Initially, many of us thought that easily hacked smart tea kettles and smart refrigerators were kind of cute. Then we realized that this same, paper-mache grade security is also apparently embedded in everything from automobiles to medical gear. Then, more recently, we realized that all of these poorly-secured devices were being quickly compromised and used in botnets to help fuel massive, historically unprecedented, new DDoS attacks. The warnings were there all along, we just chose to ignore them.

    For more than a decade people had been warning that the security on pacemakers simply wasn't very good. Despite these warnings, many of these devices are still vulnerable to attack. This week the FDA was forced to issue a warning, noting that security vulnerabilities in the St. Jude Medical implantable cardiac device and corresponding Merlin@home Transmitter could be a serious problem. It's notable as it's the first time we've seen the government publicly acknowledge this specific type of threat.

Open source enlightenment needed to end 'dark ages' of health IT

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OSS

Your article - "Whatever happened to Open Source in 2016?" highlights the brief vogue that open source recently enjoyed in the NHS – 2014-15 – and now seems to have lost. It raises some good questions and important issues, though I sense some broader perspective may be worth adding here.

It’s worth remembering that healthcare is a well-established science – the first medical school established in the 9th century. While information technology is still a young science – the first MSc in software engineering dates from 1979.

We know that the relatively risk averse culture of healthcare differs very significantly from the frenetic pace of innovation we see in the software world.

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Linux/FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS

Openwashing

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The 6 unwritten rules of open source development

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Development
OSS

The sports world is rife with unwritten rules. These are the behaviors and rituals that are observed but rarely documented in an official capacity. For example, in baseball, unwritten rules range from not stealing bases when well ahead to never giving up an intentional walk when there’s a runner on first. To outsiders, these are esoteric, perhaps even nonsensical guidelines, but they are followed by every player who wants to be a valued teammate and respected opponent.

Software development, particularly open source software development, also has an invisible rulebook. As in other team sports, these rules can have a significant impact on how an open source community treats a developer, especially newcomers.

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5 ways to be successful with open source software

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OSS

The skills gap in big data will remain relatively constant in the next year, but this shouldn’t deter people from adopting Hadoop and other open-source technologies. As most of us know, when new technologies are created and vie for users, they are known by few.

Only once a particular type of software is a mature standard part of the canon do we begin to have a substantial number of folks skilled in its use — but even then the skills gap can persist. It will disappear only when we stop seeing big improvements to the stack, which I doubt we want. In short, the skills gap is one of the primary factors gating the rate of platform change, but it’s also a sign innovation is at hand.

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Also: Proof that openness scales

My first three contributions to open source

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OSS

Getting started with an open source project can be intimidating. I wanted to contribute to open source projects, but struggled with where to start. When the time came and I finally took the shot, I ended up having an excellent learning experience. Here is my experience with my first three open source contributions.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • January 2017 PyLadies Pune meetup

    Like many of the previous PyLadies Pune meetups, I took a session in this month’s meetup too. System programming basics was the topic for my session. We did the session for around an hour, but as this month’s session also had a guest session over hangout, we could not go longer. We will do a full day workshop on the same topic in future.

  • Missing from the Trump Cabinet Nominee Hearings: Cybersecurity for Everyday Internet Users

    Protecting users’ privacy and security online is a crucial issue for all of us. Security protects elections, economies and our private online and offline lives. And many recent events (cyber attacks, hacks and threats by foreign governments) show that a secure Internet is currently under threat.

    I recently wrote about how cybersecurity is a shared responsibility. Governments, technology companies and users need to work together to strengthen cybersecurity. Mozilla knows that even one weak link — be it technical or legislative — can break the chain of security and put Internet users at risk. The chain only remains strong if technology companies, governments and users work together to keep the Internet as secure as it can be.

    You can help Mozilla stand up for a more secure Internet. We’re asking readers to pen a Letter to the Editor to their local newspaper in response to this week’s Senate hearings, and support personal security and privacy online. Get started here.

  • Open Web Development and Content Creation Tools Proliferate

    If you're involved with DevOps and web development, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find numerous and updated free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.

  • Single-cable motor interface goes open-source
  • Quantum Computing Is Real, and D-Wave Just Open-Sourced It
  • D-Wave Initiates Open Quantum Software Environment
  • The Linux and Windows Ecosystems are Converging. Here's Why It Matters [Ed: Microsoft “embrace, extend, extinguish” tactics mean one should avoid Windows; it's a trap that complicates and increases exit barriers]
  • EasyStack raises $50M Series C Round, Setting New Single Round Record in China Open Source
  • China's Cash Capital Leads $50M Series C Round In EasyStack
  • China: Investment firm Cash Capital leads $50m Series C round in EasyStack
  • DragonFlyBSD Working On NUMA-Awareness, Memory Changes

    Matthew Dillon's latest work on the DragonFlyBSD kernel includes steps towards supporting NUMA-awareness, locking, and other memory allocation related changes.

  • FSFE Annual Report 2016

    It has been a busy year for the FSFE. Upholding the principles of Free Software and protecting citizens' from being exploited are ongoing challenges we tackled from a variety of angles. We (and by "we", we mean the staff and volunteers at the FSFE) pored over hundreds of pages of policies and legislations, looking for loopholes through which Free Software could be attacked.

    We travelled to events all over Europe, often carrying with us dozens of heavy boxes of merchandising, to explain what Free Software is all about as speakers and attendees. We have organised our own events too including our first international summit.

'Opening' Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source reaches processor core

    Whether for budgetary, philosophical, or other reasons, an increasing number of embedded systems are being designed using open source elements. For the most part, these elements are software based, although there are some open source board designs in use as well. Now, the microcontroller that empowers a PCB design is available as an open source design.

    A little over a month ago, startup SiFive announced a milestone product in the development of the RISC-V (pronounced risk-five) open source microprocessor instruction set architecture (ISA). Originally developed for research and education, the architecture began moving toward industry implementation with the creation of the RISC-V Foundation in 2015. SiFive advanced that movement by developing a microcontroller design implementing the RISC-V ISA. The company has now proven that design in silicon and donated the RTL code for the design to the open source community.

  • A $12,000 open-source hardware platform to develop electric vehicles

    The automotive industry has always been capital-intensive and therefore, it has often been difficult for startups to carve themselves a space in it. But the electric vehicle revolution is disrupting the industry enough that it is opening up opportunities for startups to accelerate the pace of innovation.

    OSVehicle, a company based in Italia, is trying to help them to just that with their new platform.

    They released the second generation of the TABBY EVO, an open-source hardware platform to develop electric vehicles and electric vehicle parts. The platform enables companies or individuals wishing to develop parts for electric vehicles, or even full EVs, to leapfrog some of the development and test the parts in an open platform.

  • Renault will release its Twizy EV hardware system as an opensource platform

    The Renault POM represents the first foray by a big automaker into truly open-sourcing its vehicle platform.

  • Renault announces partners for open-source electric-vehicle platform

Why Open Source is Rising Up the Networking Stack in 2017

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OSS

With 2016 behind us, we can reflect on a landmark year where open source migrated up the stack. As a result a new breed of open service orchestration projects were announced, including ECOMP, OSM, OpenBaton, and The Linux Foundation project OPEN-O, among them. While the scope varies between orchestrating Virtualized Network Functions (VNFs) in a Cloud Data Center, and more comprehensive end-to-end service delivery platforms, the new open service orchestration initiatives enable carriers and cable operators to automate end-to-end service delivery, ultimately minimizing the software development required for new services.

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Security News

New Input Drivers and TinyDRM in Linux 4.11 Kernel

  • New Input Drivers For The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Dmitry Torokhov has submitted the input feature updates for the Linux 4.11 kernel merge window. One of the new input drivers for Linux 4.11 is the Zeitech touchscreen controller. The new Zeitec driver is zet6223 and supports the ZET6223 I2C touchscreen controller. Another new driver is for Samsung "touchkeys." The Samsung Touchkey support is the new tm2-touchkey driver and allows for touch key and LED functionality on the Exynos 5433 TM2 development board.
  • TinyDRM Queued For Linux 4.11
    TinyDRM has been queued in DRM-Next for landing with the in-development Linux 4.11 kernel. TinyDRM aims to provide "a very simplified view of DRM for displays that has onboard video memory and is connected through a slow bus like SPI/I2C." TinyDRM includes SPI and MIPI-DBI support.

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more