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OSS

Alfresco Raises A Fresh $45M To Fuel Open-Source Enterprise Content Management

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OSS

Alfresco, an open source, enterprise content management startup, is today announcing a new round of funding of $45 million — a Series D round that is more than twice as big as all of its previous rounds put together.

The UK-based company competes against legacy services like Documentum (which was co-founded by one of Alfresco’s co-founders, John Newton) and Sharepoint to help large organisations manage their disparate document storage both in the cloud and on-premises, and also offer versioning control and other compliance requirements across mobile, PC and other devices. Alfresco will use the new funding to step its business up a gear, with new sales and marketing efforts, and moves into more cloud-based services that could see it competing more directly also against the likes of Dropbox, Box and Huddle.

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NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

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OSS

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions.

Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”.

The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”.

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The Top Open Source Cloud Projects of 2014

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OSS

OpenStack is the most popular open source cloud project, followed by Docker and KVM, according to a survey of more than 550 respondents conducted by Linux.com and The New Stack and announced today at CloudOpen in Chicago.

The results reflect the rising popularity of a new generation of open source projects that for the most part are less than five years old and aimed at meeting the growing enterprise demand for cloud computing infrastructure. In turn, these young projects are showing favor but the strength of the more solid technologies have a certain degree of longevity that is also reflected in the results.

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Microsoft Lobby Denies the State of Chile Access to Free Software

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Microsoft
OSS

Fresh on the heels of the entire Munich and Linux debacle, another story involving Microsoft and free software has popped up across the world, in Chile. A prolific magazine from the South American country says that the powerful Microsoft lobby managed to turn around a law that would allow the authorities to use free software.

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Black Hat 2014: Open Source Could Solve Medical Device Security

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OSS
Security

On the topic of source code liability, Greer suggests that eventually software developers, including medical device development companies, will be responsible for the trouble their software causes (or fails to prevent). I think it’s fair to say that it is impossible to guarantee a totally secure system. You cannot prove a negative statement after all. Given enough time, most systems can be breached. So where does this potential liability end? What if my company has sloppy coding standards, no code reviews, or I use a third-party software library that has a vulnerability? Should hacking be considered foreseeable misuse?

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Does government finally grok open source?

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OSS

Yes, the government -- one U.S. federal government employee told me that government IT tends to be "stove-piped," with people "even working within the same building" not having much of a clue what their peers are doing, which is not exactly the open source way.

That's changing. One way to see this shift is in government policies. For the U.S. federal government, there is now a "default to open," a dramatic reversal on long-standing practices of spending heavily with a core of proprietary technology vendors.

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The Connected Car, Part 3: No Shortcuts to Security

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Android
Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation wants an open source platform in the pole position. The nonprofit consortium already has a fully functional Linux distribution, called "Automotive Grade Linux," or AGL. It is a customizable, open source automotive software stack with Linux at its core.

Google has its own plan for connecting cars to mobile devices and the Internet. Google's Android Auto is a dashboard navigation and entertainment system powered by an Android smartphone. It is very similar in concept to competing designs from Apple and Microsoft.

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Reprogramming Government: A Conversation With Mikey Dickerson

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Interviews
OSS

We’re encouraging open-source software and access to government data everywhere it is possible to do it.

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Open source forms the backbone of the most significant projects

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OSS

Companies increasingly understand that open source allows them to create faster, cheaper, and more secure products than they did by constantly reinventing the wheel in closed-source development environments. And the drivers of OSS adoption go beyond cost cutting and time savings. Participating in open source communities is a goal in itself—one that gives companies a competitive edge and helps them to attract top talent and influence project direction.

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As DBMS wars continue, PostgreSQL shows most momentum

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OSS

It's hard to tell which database management systems (DBMB)s are the most popular. DB-Engines gives it a try every month. And, by its count, Oracle is still the top DBMS, followed closed by Oracle's open-source DBMS MySQL, which is just noses ahead of Microsoft SQL Server.

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Also: MongoDB tosses support lifeline to open source downloaders

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More in Tux Machines

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

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Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written. Read more

From next release onwards, Debian is tied to systemd

Anyone who installs Jessie from scratch will find that they are not offered no choice in the matter. This means that only the technically well-equipped will be able to make a switch in the event that systemd does not work as promised. Existing users of the testing stream will find, on checking, that their systems have been migrated over to systemd. Systems running the stable version of Debian have not been migrated across yet. Read more