Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Events: GNOME 3.26 "Manchester", GUADEC 2017, Randa Roundup, and SRECon17 Europe

Filed under
KDE
OSS
GNOME
  • Waiting for GNOME 3.26 Stable Release!

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" planned to be released at 13 September 2017. Reading the FeaturePlans and Schedule from its wiki makes me want to run it sooner! I hope Ubuntu will successfully include 3.26 on Artful Aardvark release so I can make a review for it later. However, this short article mentions some of its new feature, new apps, some links from GUADEC 2017's participants, and further GNOME links. Enjoy!

  • GNOME GUADEC 2017: Presentations, Videos, & Links

    GUADEC 2017, the latest GNOME Project annual conference, has been held at 28 July-2 August 2017 in Manchester, United Kingdom. I collect as many resources as possible here including presentations & videos (so you can download them), poster & template, write-ups by attendees, and of course the links about GUADEC 2017. So, if you didn't attend GUADEC 2017, you still can find the resources here! Enjoy!

  • Randa Roundup - Part I

    Our intrepid developers are getting ready to make their way to Randa, and we are gradually finding out what they will be doing up there in the Swiss mountains.

    As Valorie said in a recent blog post, accessibility is useful for everybody at some point or another. Clear, highly contrasted icons, easy to reach keyboard shortcuts, and scalable fonts are things we can all appreciate most of the time, whether we have any sort of physical disability or not.

    With that in mind, Jean-Baptiste Mardelle will be working on Kdenlive, KDE's video editing software. He'll be reviewing the user interface; that is, the different panels, toolbars, etc., to make it easier to use for people who start editing for the first time. He'll also be working on packaging - creating AppImages and Flatpaks - so the latest versions of Kdenlive can be installed anywhere without having to worry about dependencies.

  • Takeaways from SRECon17 Europe

    As every last three years in a row, I attended SRECon in Europe. I can literally say this year was totally broken comparing with former conferences. I think it’s because I had much higher expectations from this conference. The first shot in 2014 was more than awesome, but year to year it’s getting worse. Almost all talks from Google were like a summary of every chapter in SRE book. We just skipped all the rest of the talks sourced by Google.

Founder Stories: A Hacker’s Hacker

Filed under
OSS

Monty is a programming genius. At 19, he dropped out of the Helsinki University of Technology to work full time, because there was little more the university could teach him. At 33, he released MySQL, the most popular open-source database in the world, after coding the entire thing up himself with the exception of one library. At 55, he defies ageism and is still the best programmer at his company.

Read more

Open Source Jobs Report 2017: open source skills in strong demand

Filed under
OSS

Hiring managers are increasingly looking for open source professionals, and two thirds of them say that the numbers of these specialists they hire will increase more than other areas of their businesses. Main drivers are company growth (60%), increasing use of open source technologies (42%), and open source becoming core to the business (30%).

Read more

Events leftovers

Filed under
OSS

OSS: OpenStack, Voting, EEE, and Genomic Open-source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII)

Filed under
OSS
  • Six strategies for scaling an open source community

    Lately, I have been revising some of the OpenStack community’s processes to make them more sustainable. As we grew over the last seven years to have more than 2,000 individual contributors to the current release, some practices that worked when they were implemented have begun causing trouble for us now that our community is changing in different ways. My goal in reviewing those practices is to find ways to eliminate the challenges. OpenStack is developed by a collection of project teams, most of which focus on a feature-related area, such as block storage or networking. The areas where we have most needed to change intersect with all of those teams, such as release management and documentation. Although the teams responsible for those tasks have tended to be small, their members have been active and dedicated. At times that dedication has masked the near-heroic level of effort they were making to keep up with the work load. When someone is overloaded in a corporate environment, where tasks are assigned and the performance and workload of team members are reviewed regularly, the employee can appeal to management for help. The solution may be to hire or assign new contributors, change the project schedule, or to make a short term trade-off that incurs technical debt. However, open source projects are largely driven by volunteers, so assigning people to work on a task isn’t an option. Even in a sponsor-driven community such as OpenStack, where many contributors are being paid to work on the project overall, sponsors typically give a relatively narrow mandate for the way their contributors can spend their time. Changing the project schedule is always an option, but if there are no volunteers for a task today, there is no guarantee volunteers will appear tomorrow, so it may not help. We must use a different approach to eliminate the need for heroic effort.

  • Open source or proprietary: how should we secure voting systems?

    The stakes are always high when it comes to software security, which is why the ongoing debate over open-source vs. proprietary tends to be passionate.

    But the stakes rise to a new level when it comes to the security (and integrity) of a nation’s voting systems. Which makes a recent, relatively civil, squabble over the topic – 15 months out from the next national US election – both passionate and significant.

    There isn’t much debate that something needs to be done to make voting systems – more than 8,000 jurisdictions in the 50 states – more secure.

    While the US intelligence community concluded that Russian hackers were “probably unsuccessful” in tampering with votes in last year’s presidential election, that doesn’t mean they didn’t try, or that their chances of future success are low.

  • Windows 10: New feature sees Microsoft blur the line between Windows and Linux [Ed: It's called "embrace and extend". And there's a third E after that: extinguish.]
  • Open-source genomic platform could aid plant breeding in developing nations

    The Genomic Open-source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII), a global project funded by an $18.5 million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, is helping bridge the gap [between crop breeders and the growing populations they feed in developing countries]. The project – a partnership between an Ithaca-based hub of researchers at The Institute of Biotechnology, Cornell and the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) and other hubs in agricultural research centers in Mexico, India and Philippines – is making state-of-the-art genomic breeding techniques available to everyone. In May, GOBII released its first products, which include a data management system to organize and access huge amounts of genomic information, and user interface tools for efficient breeding.

    “The purpose of the project is to help transform breeding programs in the developing world by implementing the most current methods being used by all major ag-tech companies around the world,” said Liz Jones, GOBII director. “

  • Big Ag Gets Ag-Gag Envy, Helps Bring In 'Seed-Preemption' Laws Across The US

        

    Supporters of the move claim that a system of local seed rules would be complicated to navigate. That's a fair point, but it's hard to believe Big Ag really cares about farmers that much.

  •  
     

78 Open Source Replacements for Expensive Applications

Filed under
OSS

Back when Datamation first started making lists of open source software that could replace expensive proprietary applications, most commercial software came in a box and required a flat fee for purchase. These days, with the advent of cloud computing and software as a service, most applications require a regular monthly or yearly subscription.

Those subscriptions make it seem like software has become more affordable. After all, $10 or $20 a month doesn't seem like a lot. But when you add up those repeating fees, users often pay more under the new subscription plans than they did under the old flat-fee arrangements. If you use a lot of different applications, those fees can quickly add up. And it can be particularly hard to justify the expense for a piece of software that you only use once in a while.

Read more

EdgeX Foundry Architectural Tenets Spur Sustainable Open Source Ecosystem Development

Filed under
OSS

From the outside, open source projects may seem somewhat messy and chaotic with no obvious central leadership or reporting structure. But most successful open source projects actually have a great deal of structure and method behind their technical decision-making.

If you explore the Wiki pages of EdgeX Foundry, you will see several references to the project’s architectural “tenets”. These are the principles that guide how the project’s contributors and technical steering committee decide what changes are accepted into the project, what features will be pursued, and ultimately what technology the group will advance together.

Read more

Petition Asks the Developers of Phoenix OS to Open Source the Kernel

Filed under
OS
Android
OSS

Android is mainly considered an open source mobile operating system, but there are a number of closed source elements that hundreds of millions of people use every day. The actual requirements of Android is that the kernel be open sourced for the public. This is enforced by the GPL but sadly this is one of those gray areas where someone actually needs to take legal action to enforce it. Some companies have violated this time and time again, and a new petition is calling for the developers of Phoenix OS to do the right thing.

For those who are unaware, Phoenix OS is one of the only full desktop versions of Android that is still being maintained. We’ve covered another popular platform, RemixOS, on a number of occasions but even they dropped out recently to focus on being a 2B2 company. This has left a lot of people to look towards Phoenix OS as their desktop Android solution, but there’s one glaring flaw here. The developers have yet to release the source code for the kernel that’s being used.

Read more

OSS: Idaho National Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Dharma, Estonia, and OpenStack

Filed under
OSS
  • INL releases new open-source software projects

    Idaho National Laboratory has released multiple new open-source software projects that are freely available to the public and open to collaboration directly with researchers and engineers outside of the laboratory. Fostering widespread distribution of this software will accelerate the adoption of these technologies within industry and fuel innovation in other research organizations that may build on them.

  • Open source data platform for smart agriculture proposed

    New Delhi, Aug 31 (PTI) A plan to create an open source data platform for "smart agriculture" was mooted by the Department of Biotechnology in a two-day conference that concluded today.

    It has been envisaged that the data platform FarmerZone will help cater to the needs of farmers by providing market intelligence, weather predictions, and information on soil, water and seed requirements.

    The Department of Biotechnology (DBT), under the Ministry of Science and Technology, convened the Smart Agriculture Conclave here in partnership with the UKs Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Research Councils UK (RCUK), India.

  • Dharma wants to let anyone borrow a small amount of cryptocurrency

    dApps, or decentralized apps, are open-source applications built on top of a blockchain. But here’s the thing – users usually can’t interact with these dApps unless they have tokens issued by these projects. For example, both Augur, a decentralized prediction market and REXMLS, a free global listing network for real estate, require tokens to interact with.

  • Estonia considering Ethereum-based cryptocoin

    Estonia is considering the issue of crypto-tokens, which would make it (almost) the first country to attract investment through an Initial Coin Offering (ICO). The scheme would let buyers of the new estcoin hold a stake in the Estonian economy.

    The estcoin would be based on the Ethereum infrastructure, a public open-source blockchain specifically developed to facilitate smart contracts.

  • OpenStack 'Pike' Focuses on Basics Instead of Gee-Whiz New Features

    There's a new release of OpenStack, the open source infrastructure-as-a-service platform for cloud computing. The new release, Pike, isn't chock-full of new features, as OpenStack's focus for the next several releases will be on stability, scalability, performance and ease-of-use.

    Actually, this is a good time for the platform's developers to step away from any mad rush to add new features and concentrate on improving the basics. Back in April, when we reported on Open Stack's ninth User Survey, we noted that although use of the platform was on the rise, in some cases user satisfaction was declining, most likely over usability issues.

An economically efficient model for open source software license compliance

Filed under
OSS

"The Compliance Industrial Complex" is a term that evokes dystopian imagery of organizations engaging in elaborate and highly expensive processes to comply with open source license terms. As life often imitates art, many organizations engage in this practice, sadly robbing them of the many benefits of the open source model. This article presents an economically efficient approach to open source software license compliance.

Open source licenses generally impose three requirements on a distributor of code licensed from a third party:

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, Smartwatches, Google, NSA, Microsoft and Flexera FUD

  • WPA2 flaw's worst impact on Android, Linux devices

    The flaw in the WPA2 wireless protocol revealed recently has a critical impact on Android phones running version 6.0 of the mobile operating system and Linux devices, a security researcher says.

  • Why the Krack Wi-Fi Mess Will Take Decades to Clean Up

    But given the millions of routers and other IoT devices that will likely never see a fix, the true cost of Krack could play out for years.

  • 'All wifi networks' are vulnerable to hacking, security expert discovers

    WPA2 protocol used by vast majority of wifi connections has been broken by Belgian researchers, highlighting potential for internet traffic to be exposed

  • Kids' smartwatches can be 'easily' hacked, says watchdog

    Smartwatches bought for children who do not necessarily need them can be hacked [sic], according to a warning out of Norway and its local Consumer Council (NCC).

  • John Lewis pulls children's smartwatch from sale over spying fears

    The Norwegian Consumer Council (NCC) revealed that several brands of children’s smartwatch, have such poor security controls that hackers [sic] could easily follow their movements and eavesdrop on conversations.

  • Google's 'Advanced Protection' Locks Down Accounts Like Never Before

    Google hasn't shared the details of what that process entails. But the CDT's Hall, whom Google briefed on the details, says it will include a "cooling-off" period that will lock the account for a period of time while the user proves his or her identity via several other factors. That slowed-down, intensive check is designed to make the account-recovery process a far less appealing backdoor into victims' data.

  • NSA won't say if it knew about KRACK, but don't look to this leaked doc for answers
    Given how involved the NSA has been with remote and local exploitation of networks, systems, devices, and even individuals, many put two and two together and assumed the worst. What compounded the matter was that some were pointing to a 2010-dated top secret NSA document leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, which detailed a hacking tool called BADDECISION, an "802.11 CNE tool" -- essentially an exploit designed to target wireless networks by using a man-in-the-middle attack within range of the network. It then uses a frame injection technique to redirect targets to one of the NSA's own servers, which acts as a "matchmaker" to supply the best malware for the target device to ensure it's compromised for the long-term. The slide said the hacking tool "works for WPA/WPA2," suggesting that BADDECISION could bypass the encryption. Cue the conspiracy theories. No wonder some thought the hacking tool was an early NSA-only version of KRACK.
  • You're doing open source wrong, Microsoft tsk-tsk-tsks at Google: Chrome security fixes made public too early [Ed: Says the company that gives back doors to the NSA and attacks FOSS with patents, lobbying etc.]
  • Why Open Source Security Matters for Healthcare Orgs [Ed: marketing slant for firms that spread FUD]
    Open source software can help healthcare organizations remain flexible as they adopt new IT solutions, but if entities lack open source security measures it can lead to larger cybersecurity issues. A recent survey found that organizations in numerous industries might not be paying enough attention to potential open source risk factors. Half of all code used in commercial and Internet of Things (IoT) software products is open source, but only 37 percent of organizations have an open source acquisition or usage policy, according to a recent Flexera report. More than 400 commercial software suppliers and in-house software development teams were interviewed, with respondent roles including software developers, DevOps, IT, engineering, legal, and security.

Games: JASEM, openage, Riskers, Rise to Ruins, Slime Rancher

The most promising linux distributions in 2017

Linux distributions have already gained recognition of its users and with every year new products appear in the market. Many of them focus on the certain tasks, so you can’t create a single list of the best ones. Here we have chosen several fields of Linux use and those distributions that have all chances to take the initial positions in their niche in 2017. Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) released

Codenamed "Artful Aardvark", Ubuntu 17.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technology into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. As always, the team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs. Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more. Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 Debuts Officially with GNOME 3.26 on Top of Wayland, Linux 4.13 How to: Upgrade Ubuntu 17.04 to Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 ISOs Officially Released 10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Now Available to Download, This Is What’s New How to Enable Night Light on Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark Released With New Features — Download Torrents And ISO Files Here Ubuntu Flavors, Including Ubuntu MATE 17.10, Are Available to Download Ubuntu 17.10 'Artful Aardvark' ditches Unity for Gnome