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OSS

4 Myths About Open Source We Should Put to Rest

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OSS

wired.com: OSS is still often derided as inferior in quality, security, and longevity in comparison to proprietary software when there is plenty of evidence to the contrary. Here are 4 concerns that still persist about OSS, and why they should officially be labeled myths:

A swan song from this departing open source blogger

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OSS
Web

zdnet.com: As I sign off from my duties at ZDNet, and more than 20 years following open source, I am struck with the realization that open source has, in many respects, really taken over the world.

Two fallacies of choice

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OSS

ohjeezlinux.wordpress: Five years later, I still think Adam Jackson’s “Linux is not about choice” might be the best thing ever posted to fedora-devel-list.

Why it's time to stop using open source licences

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OSS

h-online.com: Free software is built on a paradox. In order to give freedom to users, free software licences use something that takes away freedom – copyright, which is an intellectual monopoly based on limiting people's freedom to share, not enlarging it.

Perforce: Linux, Open Source Commitment High

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OSS

thevarguy.com: Should companies that produce mostly proprietary software invest in Linux development? In one sense, that seems as illogical as the artisanal-organic bread guy from the local farmers’ market buying shares in Wonder Bread. But

Has Microsoft finally embraced open source?

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Microsoft
OSS

infoworld.com: By implementing Git in its developer tools, Microsoft is using GPL-licensed software -- and perhaps ending its war on open source

VLC Multimedia Player Shows Changing Open Source License Is Hard, But Possible

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Software
OSS

techdirt.com: Licenses lie at the heart of open source -- and many other kinds of "open" too. That's because they are used to define the rights of users, and to ensure those rights are passed on -- that the intellectual commons is not enclosed. Their central importance explains in part the flamewars that erupt periodically over which license is "best."

Why I contribute my changes to Libreoffice and won’t re-license

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LibO
OSS

mmohrhard.wordpress: So after reading several times on another mailing list that Libreoffice developers should relicense their patches to make them available to other descendents in the OpenOffice.org ecosystem I’m explaining why I contribute to the Libreoffice project and license my changes only as LGPLv3+/MPL.

Closed minds of "Open Source" eject iTWire from Linux conference

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Linux
OSS

itwire.com: In the more than 30 years that I have been involved with the tech industry I have seen a lot of strange things but none stranger than the events of today at the Linux Conference Australia. iTWire senior Linux writer Sam Varghese has been ejected from the conference.

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