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Software Freedom Day Coverage

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Software Freedom Day and FOSS News

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  • Happy Software Freedom Day!

    And today is the 13th edition of Software Freedom Day! We wish you all a great day talking to people and discovering (or making them discovery) the benefits and joys of running Free Software. As usual we have a map where you can find all the events in your area. Should you just discover about SFD today and want to organize an event it is never too late. While the date is global, each team has the freedom to run the event at a date that is convenient in their area. We (in Cambodia) are running our event on November 26 due to university schedule, other conferences and religious holidays conflicting.

  • Canonical and Western Digital launch Ubuntu Linux 'Nextcloud Box' powered by Raspberry Pi

    Cloud storage is amazingly convenient. Unfortunately, the best part of the cloud can also be the worst. You see, having your files stored on someone else's severs and accessing them over the internet opens you to focused hacking, and potentially, incompetence by the cloud storage company too. As a way to have the best of both worlds, some folks will set up net-connected local storage so they can manage their own 'cloud'.

  • Run Your Own Private Ubuntu Cloud with the Nextcloud Box

    Most of us love using the cloud. It gives us on-the-go-access to our personal files, photos and documents, and helps keep our busy lives in sync.

    But loving the cloud doesn’t mean you have to love using a proprietary closed-off services like Dropbox, Google Drive or One Drive.

  • Cache in hand, Varnish cloud workload tuning goes one louder

    Content delivery firm Varnish Software has announced its Varnish Plus Cloud product — essentially, a full version of the Varnish Plus software suite that can be accessed via the AWS (Amazon Web Services) Marketplace.

  • Nexenta wins NetNordic open source storage contract

    NetNordic said it has recently chosen Nexenta to create a centralised storage repository for its customer base as well as for the company, as the operator and its customer base continue to grow. Nexenta provides open source-driven, software-defined storage, which offers extra data with compression turned on, a significant factor for NetNordic, said its operations engineer Sander Petersson.

  • Toyota, Open Source Robotics Foundation to partner on automated vehicle research
  • The scourge of LEDs everywhere: Readers speak out

    Open Source to the Rescue

    One solution to LED overload is going with open source technology.

    One Slashdot commenter going by the handle of guruevi uses OpenWrt: "You can reprogram any LED on your router for whatever purpose. Want them all on or off at the certain time of day or blink if it detected anomalous traffic."

    I also got email from Dave Taht, who happened to recently write a blog post titled "Blinkenlights: A debugging aid AND a curse" (with the subhed of "Too many LEDs! Give me back the stars!"). Taht is a busy guy as director of the Make Wi-Fi Fast project and co-founder of the Bufferbloat and CeroWrt projects, though took time out to share some LED disabling tips in his blog post.

    Taht, like many of those cited above, has made his share of manual fixes over the years, using electrical tape and just plan moving devices behind things. Only recently did he start monkeying with software to solve his problem.

  • On the importance of patient empowerment and open source: A Medicine X panel weighs in

    Speaker Karen Sadler, JD, heartedly agreed that developing open-source software for medical devices is critical. She is the executive director of Software Freedom Conservancy, a non-profit organization that develops, promotes and defends open-source software. Her life was changed when she was diagnosed with a life-threatening heart problem and implanted with a defibrillator. “I went from someone who thought open source was cool and useful to someone who thought great open-source software is essential for our society,” Sadler said.

  • Open Science Project Presents Brand New Approach for Malaria Drug Discovery
  • Unique open science project shows way for development of new antimalarial treatments
  • OICR Team Develops Open-Source Offline Base Caller for MinIon Nanopore Sequencer
  • Welcome to the age of the open-source executive

    Open-source code is no longer just for computers – it’s increasingly the code for how business gets done in a globally connected, always-on marketplace.

    Today’s marketing executive needs a skillset that is freely used, freely changed and freely shared by anyone. The modern marketer must understand return on investment like a chief financial officer, technology like a chief technology officer, product integration like a chief product officer, PR like a chief commercial officer, and bring it all together like a chief executive – all the while delivering compelling, seamless and delightful consumer experiences.

OSS Leftovers

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  • Elizabeth Joseph Talking Open Source Careers in Oman

    Sometimes we wonder how Ms. Joseph finds the time to balance her career at HP with writing, evangelizing Ubuntu and public speaking, along with an active life in the city by the bay. That she is an inspiration to open sourcers everywhere can be seen in this video.

  • Canonical and Western Digital launch Ubuntu Linux 'Nextcloud Box' powered by Raspberry Pi

    Cloud storage is amazingly convenient. Unfortunately, the best part of the cloud can also be the worst. You see, having your files stored on someone else's severs and accessing them over the internet opens you to focused hacking, and potentially, incompetence by the cloud storage company too. As a way to have the best of both worlds, some folks will set up net-connected local storage so they can manage their own 'cloud'.

  • Canonical & Nextcloud Roll Out An Ubuntu-Powered Nextcloud 10 Box

    The embargo expired this morning on the Nextcloud Box, a device from the cooperation of Canonical, Nextcloud, and WDLabs for making it easy to deploy your own Ubuntu-powered personal cloud.

  • HPE sells Vertica analytics, thanks to the growth of open source software

    HPE is paring down its software holdings, including analytical software in the Vertica line. A sale to Micro Focus is due to close next year.

  • Mirantis, a startup driving VMware and Red Hat crazy, just bought a 30-person startup for $30 million

    Cloud computing has vastly changed the $3 trillion enterprise computer industry and one of the most interesting technologies at the center of this trend is called OpenStack.

    And one of the critical (and oddest) companies at the center of OpenStack is Mirantis.

    On Thursday, Mirantis announced that it bought a startup in Prague called TCP Cloud.

  • Mirantis Doubles Down on Kubernetes, Cloud Management with Acquisition

    Mirantis, focused on OpenStack, announced an initiative in February of last year that would integrate Kubernetes with OpenStack, letting developers deploy containers on OpenStack in what the company claimed took only minutes. Since then, Kubernetes' star has risen and containers are all the rage.

    Against that backdrop, Mirantis has announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire TCP Cloud. Headquartered in Prague, Czech Republic, TCP Cloud employs 30 people and specializes in managed services for OpenStack, OpenContrail and Kubernetes. The acquisition will support Mirantis’ initiative with Google and Intel to enable OpenStack on Kubernetes by equipping Mirantis to continuously deliver OpenStack to customer datacenters. According to Mirantis, the combined entity will solve the problem of upgrades, which is one of the primary burdens of on-premises infrastructure.

    "The model for delivering infrastructure employed by traditional vendors is fundamentally misaligned with modern software development patterns. Disruptors of the digital era push new code to production multiple times a day, while traditional enterprise vendors ship infrastructure as packaged software once every few years and require forklift upgrades,” said Alex Freedland, Mirantis CEO. “Mirantis empowers enterprises to embrace the new, continuously delivered infrastructure model on their terms. TCP Cloud’s technology and expertise helps us accelerate that vision."

  • Proposal Calls for Moving NetBeans Stewardship from Oracle to Apache
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: September 16th
  • denemo Version 2.0.12 is out.
  • Libreboot Leaves GNU Claiming Gender Identity Discrimination by FSF

    A disturbing story broke this morning concerning the sudden action by the Libreboot project to leave the GNU project. I started to write “potentially disturbing,” until it occurred to me that no matter how this plays out, the news is disturbing.

  • LEOS – drafting legislative texts made easy

    While LEOS has been developed to support the drafting of legislation by the European Commission services (i.e. proposals for directives, regulations and autonomous acts), public administrations can download and adapt the code to meet their own specific requirements. The code is available under the free European Union Public Licence (EUPL).

  • Raspberry Pi sells 10 million units, Open Library Foundation established, and more open source news
  • Open-source research mechanism could lead to discovery of new, cheap medicines for malaria

    Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries – last year killing more than 400,000 people. Researchers worldwide have found the solution for drug discovery could lie in open, “crowd-sourced” science.

  • UK researchers release open source RMADS code for Matlab to help users find best 3D printing solution

    Now that the dust from the desktop 3D printing explosion has settled, one thing has become clear: desktop 3D printing is fantastic, but DIY part design comes with a huge learning curve. Even experienced users regularly run into design challenges and issues surrounding materials and costs. But there is a solution. British researchers from Newcastle University have just shared their own open source RMADS code for Matlab, which consists of a detailed 3D printing advice system that helps users find the best and most cost-effective 3D printing solution.

Monitoring open source software key for DevOps shops

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Open source software is all the rage, as the DevOps movement advances, but it's important to keep track of it carefully for licensing and security purposes.

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Good things come from projects that fail

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Without realizing it, I joined the open source movement in 1999 during the midst of the Kosovo refugee crisis. I was part of a team helping route aid supplies to local humanitarian organizations running transit camps across Albania. These are the camps that refugees often arrived at first before being moved to larger, more formal camps.

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EU FOSSA publishes core sections of its deliverables

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OSS

To promote the exchange of comments made by the Free and Open Source Software communities, the EU FOSSA project points out some specific sections of the deliverables he produced so far. By consulting these chapters, you have a more direct insight to what the project team consider as the most relevant information.

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Nextcloud and Canonical Introduce Nextcloud Box to Create Your Own Private Cloud

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Ubuntu

Today, September 16, 2016, Nextcloud informs Softpedia about the launch of a new hardware product, the first in the company's history, in collaboration with Canonical and WDLabs.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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The open-source Dronecode dog fight

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Dronecode's Platinum members are 3DR, Intel, and Qualcomm. Dronecode, which uses Linux as its base, is sponsored by The Linux Foundation. Dronecode's governance, however, is completely independent of the Foundation.

This fork happened because of the Platinum's members' "overwhelming desire to be able to make a proprietary autopilot stack." They were able to do this, wrote Tridgell, because "the structure and bylaws of Dronecode are built around exceptional power for the Platinum members, giving them extraordinary control over the future of Dronecode. This is a fundamental flaw in a project meant to promote free and open-source software as it means that the business interests of a very small number of members can override the interests of the rest of the members and the community."

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.