Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Oettinger: ‘Open source licences should be the norm’

Filed under
OSS

Industry-friendly open source licences should become the norm for building data platforms, for the web, and for digital consumer services, says Günther Oettinger. The European Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society urges cooperation between standardisation organisations and open source communities on cloud computing services.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Evangelizing open source: Interview with OSCON speaker Gabrielle Crevecoeur

    A recent graduate of Florida State University, Gabrielle Crevecoeur is a technical evangelist at Microsoft specializing in open source development. She will be speaking at OSCON about how to run the Johnny-Five Javascript framework on Arduino and have it sing Frozen's hit song Let It Go. So, I caught up with her to ask some questions before her talk.

  • Google open sources Chromium browser bug tracker

    Chrome is a proprietary software application development product... and Chromium is open source. Google draws its source code for Chrome from the Chromium project once it is happy with the stability and functionalities of features in production.

  • France Chooses Freedom

    It’s been a long time coming but France is now on its way to giving preference to ODF over M$’s mess of a standard for documents.

  • Open Data Barometer 2015: 5 European countries in the Top 10

    The UK is still at the top of the barometer, but is now followed by the USA and France, both ranked second. France, which was third in 2014, received good marks in three criteria: government action, political impact and, citizens and civil rights.

OpenStack Event and News

Filed under
OSS
  • OpenStack’s director: Why open source cloud should be the core of your data center

    Six years ago over two days engineers from Rackspace and NASA met in Austin, Texas, for the very first OpenStack Summit. Six years later, OpenStack is returning to its roots.

    As it does so, OpenStack has cemented itself as the dominant open source IaaS platform. But at the same time, more proprietary offerings from vendors like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and VMware still seem to reign in the broader market.

  • Blueprint: Top 10 Use Cases for OpenStack SDN

    Years ago, Linux opened up the data center and made it programmable, uncorking a Genie’s bottle of previously unimagined use cases, wealth and possibilities that became known as the cloud. For years after the data center became a software-programmable cloud, networking remained the bottleneck in an otherwise programmable environment. Today, we’re seeing a similar transformation with the advent of SDN and NFV. Launching in 2010, a free and open-source software infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) platform for cloud computing, OpenStack, made it easier to configure cloud infrastructure by linking compute, storage, and networking resources to support a range of use cases. Now, SDN is not just supporting but driving some of the biggest innovations in cloud services. Enabling users to easily deploy and manage resources from a single pane of glass, production services that used to take months to provision are now live in mere minutes.

  • OpenStack by the numbers: Who’s using open source clouds and for what?

    The latest bi-annual survey data of OpenStack users shows a continuing march of the open source cloud software into mainstream of enterprises, but also the project’s continued challenges related to ease of deployment and management.

  • Kicking off the Summit, and more OpenStack news

    Catch up on the latest OpenStack happenings in this special summit edition of our weekly OpenStack news. Members of the Opensource.com team will be in Austin this week for the feature event, so be sure to follow us on Twitter to learn what's happening this week in real time.

  • Akanda Releases New Version of OpenStack Astara at OpenStack Summit Austin

    Customers Can Cut the Cord With Over-the-Top Network Functions; Advanced Features for High Network Availability; and New IPV6 VPN Services for Hybrid Cloud & IOT Infrastructures

Bulgaria moves towards open source repository

Filed under
OSS

The Bulgarian parliament is likely to approve plans to start a repository for software developed by or for the government. The source code store is to be managed by a new organisation, the eGovernment Agency. The proposal has passed the first reading in the National Assembly on 15 April and is expected to be accepted by vote in May.

Read more

Google Summer of Code 2016

Filed under
Google
OSS
GNOME
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 Projects Announced

    Google announced this week the participating student projects for this year's Summer of Code.

  • GSoC 2016 at coala

    coala participates in this GSoC under the PSF umbrella. This year we got a stunning number of 8 GSoC projects just working with us.

  • GSoC 2016 is Starting at GNOME

    Dear GSoC Students, dear GNOME community – and especially dear rejected students,

    Google Summer of Code 2016 is starting. GNOME has accepted 21 students – we are thrilled to work with you people!

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Refactoring the open-source photography community

    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.

  • Is Firefox Search Worth $375M/Year to a Yahoo Buyer?

    That’s because Mozilla is highly dependent on a five-year contract with Yahoo, signed in December 2014, where it receives about $375m per year to make Yahoo the default search provider in the Firefox browser on the desktop. From 2004 to 2014, that contract was exclusively with Google; now it’s Yahoo in the US, Google in Europe, Yandex in Russia and Baidu in China.

  • How to build a Linux router, Internet of Things devices, and more news
  • Aravena's Small Step, Open Source's Big Leap

    Aravena’s recent initiative to open-source four of his built projects goes a long way to promoting the public and social benefits of collaboration and information-sharing.

  • CERN Makes 300TB of Large Hadron Collider Data Public

    CERN has recently released the data from the famous 2011 experiment probing the fundamental structure of the Universe to the public. These raw and processed data can be analyzed and verified using CERN Linux virtual environment on a virtual machine.

  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access

    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public.

    The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).

  • Lawsuit Filed Over PACER Fees

    For many years we've pointed out that the fees charged by PACER were clearly outside what the law allows. If you don't know, PACER is the electronic filing system for the federal court system. It is great that all filings in federal cases are available online, but the interface looks like it was designed in 1998, the search is ridiculous, and (worst of all) the system charges you 10 cents per page of download -- excluding judicial opinions, but including HTML pages including search results and docket reports. There is a cap of $3 per document, but that means that every time I call up PACER on a big case -- say the Apple/DOJ encryption battle, there are so many filings that just to look at the docket is basically $3. That adds up.

Wireless-equipped Arduino clone is AA battery sized

Filed under
OSS

The open source “AAduino” Arduino clone measures 44.9 x 13.8mm, and integrates an ATmega328P MCU, 32KB of flash, temp sensors, and a RFM69C radio.

For two and a half years, Nathan Chantrell’s open-spec Tiny328 has held the record for smallest, radio-enabled Arduino clone. It was therefore fitting that Chantrell was one of the first to compliment Johan Kanflo on his posting of an “AAduino” project for a similar device with a “What a brilliant idea!” The AAduino is even smaller than the Tiny328, and it fits snugly into a AA battery holder next to its AA power sources. The device is well suited for low-cost, low-power, wireless IoT endpoints.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • OpenIndiana 2016.04 Released To Let OpenSolaris Live On

    OpenIndiana 2016.04 has been released as the newest version of this operating system based on Illumos and originally derived from OpenSolaris.

    OpenIndiana Hipster 2016.04 is the project's first OS release in a half-year. Unfortunately, there aren't many details about the new release. The release announcement simply says, "As always, there were a lot of changes since last snapshot."

  • From Concept to Cloud: How to Leverage Open Tools

    There are many ongoing projects for producing free open source-related documentation, such as FLOSS Manuals, and there are good guides to open source tools all around the Internet.

  • On the Artificial Intelligence Front, Open Source Tools are Proliferating

    If you ask many people to name the technology categories that are creating sweeping change right now, cloud computing and Big Data analytics would probably be top of mind for a lot of them. However, there is an absolute renaissance going on right now in the field of artificial intelligence and the closely related field of machine learning.

  • JavaZone Sells Open Source in TV Parodies

    When I found out that I was going to have the opportunity to substitute for Phil Shapiro for today’s video column, I jumped at the chance. Why? Because I want to share with you one of the great TV parodies that the JavaZone conference produces each year.

  • UI faculty move toward open source text

    University of Idaho students may soon find themselves among the 1.2 million of their peers saving big money on required texts, thanks to an organization offering open source alternatives to pricey books.

  • UI celebrates Open Education Week as movement to adopt open resources picks up pace

    With the beginning of every new semester, one thing never seems to change — college textbooks are expensive, heavy, mostly required and often useless.

    At the University of Idaho, many are trying to do their part to ease that burden and Open Education Week is an attempt to demonstrate that.

    ASUI President Max Cowan said signing onto a partnership with OpenStax is one step forward the university has made this semester.

  • Not just for software: Bringing open-source philosophy to hardware

    Zannos spoke about Google’s announcement and what that foreshadows for OpenPOWER. “Google obviously is talking about Power9 [an IBM processor] and announced some plans that they’ll continue to share over time,” he said, adding that this speaks broadly to the wide adoption of alternative platforms.

  • Maxwell moves on from GDS to national technology advisor role

    New position will see former government CTO expand government relationships with digital and technology industry to boost UK digital economy

    Government chief technology officer Liam Maxwell is to leave his role to take up a new post as national technology advisor.

    Maxwell's new role is intended to beef up the government's relationships with the digital and technical industry to boost the UK's digital economy and provide better public services for citizens.

  • LocalGovDigital agrees 15 service standards

    Agile methodologies, consistency with other government digital services, open standards and making use of common platforms are among the key features of the final draft of the Digital Service Standard for local government, which was released by the practitioners' group LocalGovDigital late last week.

  • 5 Features to Look For In A Next-Generation Firewall

    Sure, the term next-generation firewall (NGFW) has been around since 2007 and the vendors have been hyping these products for a close to a decade.

Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

    Machine learning has come of age in public health reporting according to researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. They have found that existing algorithms and open source machine learning tools were as good as, or better than, human reviewers in detecting cancer cases using data from free-text pathology reports. The computerized approach was also faster and less resource intensive in comparison to human counterparts.

  • Machine learning can help detect presence of cancer, improve public health reporting

    To support public health reporting, the use of computers and machine learning can better help with access to unstructured clinical data--including in cancer case detection, according to a recent study.

Linux/OSS on Servers

Filed under
Server
OSS
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.