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OSS

Why I chose Wordpress for my college football blog

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OSS

At this point, I started making WordPress websites—taking a theme and customizing it to create a branded site for companies. I definitely felt empowered. WordPress is open source, and I am grateful for this, as it has become the very core of many successful businesses across the globe. It is the core of what I do every day, whether writing, consulting, or developing a website.

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Bulgaria to start open source repository

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OSS

The government of Bulgaria has proposed to start a repository for open source software. The government also wants to make it mandatory to use the web based code revision and code management system for all future government software development projects.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Open source projects rely on donated time—what motivates participants?

    The study’s authors collected data from approximately a thousand R contributors who responded to a questionnaire distributed via e-mail. The respondents were asked about what drove them to participate in the project, with possible answers including taking pleasure in applying their skills and feeling a sense of responsibility toward the scientific community. They were also asked about extrinsic motivators, such as the potential that their work could help with academic advancement. Additionally, the surveys included questions about the characteristics of the software development work (e.g. repetitive, technical, social) and the demographics of participants.

  • Implementing open source requires tough staffing, IT calls
  • Import old email archives into Gmail using these open source tools from Google

    If you want to try these open source tools yourself, you can download them at Github (mail-importer and import-mailbox-to-gmail). Unfortunately, mail-importer appears to only support Thunderbird at this time. If you used a different client, you will need to wait for a future update. If you are savvy enough, maybe you can tweak the source to make it work. I have a large Lotus Notes archive saved -- I won't hold my breath on that one being anyone's priority.

  • Celebrate GIS Day 2015 with 3 open source alternatives to Google Maps API

    If you're looking to get started with web mapping, here are three libraries which are worth checking out.

  • Stickers

    Basically, stickers are a great way to promote open source projects. Also – fun! For more “Rules of sticker club” go HERE.

  • LinuxCon Europe – Day 1
  • SQL CRUD: what’s good and what’s crud?
  • Setting up a Digital Ocean remotely hosted WordPress blog

    After considering our options, we decided to try using a Digital Ocean “Droplet” to host a WordPress blog. Here, I want to tell you how that went, and give a few pointers. This might be a good idea for some of you. And, I’ll explain what the heck Digital Ocean is in case you don’t know.

  • RoboTutor team using open source tools to address short supply of teachers, schools

    Where were these Carnegie Mellon University researchers when Sister Thomas Catherine was frightening me and other good little Catholic school 3rd graders back in the day?

    CMU today informed us that a team of its researchers is taking aim at the $10 million grand prize of the $15 million Global Learning XPRIZE competition, the goal of which is to empower children to take control of their own learning via tablet computers, software and the like. The competition was announced about a year ago.

  • LLVM's Clang Lands More CUDA Improvements

    Just days after writing about GPUCC as Google's open-source CUDA compiler built atop LLVM and how to compile CUDA code with LLVM, more improvements have landed.

    There's now support for CUDA compilation by default as one of the most prominent changes today. "Currently clang requires several additional command line options in order to enable new features needed during CUDA compilation. This patch makes these options default." That change was done by Artem Belevich at Google.

  • These Biohackers Are Creating Open-Source Insulin

    The 370 million people worldwide with diabetes rely on injections of insulin to regulate the amount of sugar in their blood, since their bodies can’t make the hormone themselves. Since there are no generic versions available in the United States, insulin is very expensive—that cost was likely a large proportion of the $176 billion in medical expenditures incurred by diabetes patients in 2012 alone. Now a team of biohackers with Counter Culture Labs, a community lab in Oakland, California, wants to pave the way towards generic insulin, and they’ve started a crowdfunding page for their project.

  • OpenCar wants to open source in-vehicle infotainment

    The OpenCar suite of offerings come together to work in a way similar to the software developer kits (SDK) offered for various tech and platforms. Everything from Web-based applications like WordPress to gadgets like the Apple Watch have developer kits associated with them so that third-party programmers can build software to work with them. In many ways, what OpenCar is offering is the platform for an SDK for in-car infotainment. Automakers still have to sign on and make their software compatible, but in return they can open their vehicle infotainment to outside developers without compromising its integrity or their control of the experience, branding, and legalities.

  • How will the children of the future learn about science?

    As our understanding of the world expands, it is important to ensure that that knowledge is equally accessible by all members of our society. This is vital to the progress of humanity. This philosophy, which is shared by the open source software movement, is not new; it has been around since the 1600s when the first academic journals were published for public reading. The Jupyter Notebook hints at what the academic journals of tomorrow will look like and paints a promising picture. They will be interactive, visualization-focused, user-friendly, and include code and data as first-class citizens. I believe that these unique characteristics will go a long way toward bridging the gap of understanding between the scientific community and the general public through both narrative and code—a gap that, when bridged, will have a significant impact on our society.

  • EC brings pan-European open data together on European Data Portal

    On November 16, the European Commission launched the European Data Portal, which will serve as a central gateway to data published by administrations in countries across Europe, from the EU and beyond. Currently over 240,000 datasets from 34 European countries can be accessed through thirteen different categories and a multi-language search function.

  • Greek geodata project extends open data platform

    The Greek government’s open geodata platform (geodata.gov.gr) is making available as open source several tools and extensions to CKAN, a commonly used data management system. The development of reusable tools to help publish and discover open geospatial data is one of the goals of the PublicaMundi project that built Greece’s geodata platform.

  • Betty Hacker embeds open hardware electronics into cakes

    The code I used can be found below.

  • You might want to hug this book: a review of 'Git for Teams'

    Git has a bit of a reputation as being difficult to learn and even more difficult to master. Because it's such a powerful and flexible tool, it is easy for users to make hard-to-correct mistakes. When working with others, it becomes even easier to get out of sorts. Git for Teams aims to solve that problem by not only teaching the reader how to use Git, but how to use teams.

Hiring Open Source Maintainers is Key to Stable Software Supply Chain

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OSS

Samsung is on a multi-year journey to become both a better consumer of open source, and a better contributor and leader in the projects that end up in our products. The reasons for doing so are quite clear to us: While it’s easy to use code that’s made freely available, it’s risky and potentially quite expensive to rely upon it long-term, unless you are proactively working within the community.

The reason it’s potentially risky is actually the flip side of two of the biggest benefits of open source: development moves extremely fast, and a vibrant developer community leads to more diverse contributions. The result of this combination is that the APIs and the features you depend upon today could be entirely different tomorrow, depending upon the will of the contributor community.

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Open source OpenWRT router has automatic updates

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Linux
OSS

CZ.NIC has found Indiegogo success with an open source, OpenWRT “Turris Omnia” router with crypto security, automatic updates, and NAS and server functions.

CZ.NIC, a non-profit organization that runs the .CZ top level domain of the Czech Republic, released its first open source hardware and software router design called Turris in 2014, offering systems to interested hackers on an invitation-only basis. Now, it is expanding to a larger base via Indiegogo with a new Turris Omnia design touted for its high performance, security, automatic updates, and multiple servers.

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Farmers need better software

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OSS

The Open Food Network is a free, open source, scalable e-commerce marketplace and logistics platform that enables communities and producers to connect, trade, and coordinate the movement of food. It was founded by Serenity Hill and Kirsten Larsen, and besides being a network of consumers and producers, Open Food Network is built on free and open source software and released under AGPL license. Plus, anyone can contribute to the project on GitHub.

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Open source EcoGIS lets towns reduce CO₂ emission

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OSS

The EcoGIS solution was made available as open source at the SFScon free software conference, which took place in Bozen/Bolzano last week. The software licensed under the AGPL.

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Plotly to open source its dataviz code

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OSS

Data visualization platform Plotly is open-sourcing its powerful JavaScript library, which supports three dozen different types of graphics including maps, box plots and density plots as well as more common offerings like as bar and line charts. The code is scheduled to be posted on GitHub at https://github.com/plotly/plotly.js today.

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14 amazing open source gifts for the holidays

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OSS

Here it is—the annual Opensource.com holiday gift guide. Our collection of gifts is sure to get kids, adults, and hobbyists geared up and ready for hours of fun coding and creating. We've got 3D printers, Arduinos, Raspberry Pis, gadgets, robotics, and more!

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France votes for open source, Govt. not keen

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OSS

After India, it seems the French public are the next in queue favouring open source for government administrative offices. The results of a public consultation on France’s Digital Republic bill came out after 20 days of public voting and debate. 147,710 votes were cast, 8501 proposals received and 21,330 participants took part.

The proposal was submitted by April, France’s free software advocacy group and the one relevant to open source software usage in administrative offices is in the third spot in the results.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics

Games for GNU/Linux

  • MAME 0.183 Open-Source Arcade Machine Emulator Supports Incredibly Rare Systems
    The developers of the open-source and multi-platform MAME (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator) computer emulator application announced the availability of MAME 0.183. MAME 0.183 is a maintenance and feature release of the software project that promises to add numerous functionality improvements, a bunch of bug fixes, and some new additions, such as support for some incredible rare systems, including Omega, Dodge Man, Flash Boy, Sega Sonic Cosmo Fighter, Galaxy Games StarPak 3, and Puzznic.
  • Some thoughts on Realpolitiks, a real-time grand strategy game now on Linux
    Realpolitiks [Steam, Official Site] is a new real-time (with pausing) grand strategy game from Jujubee S.A. and I was sent a key by the developer to be able to take a look. It does have a demo available on Steam, so it will be worth taking a look to see if it's your thing. A couple of things to note first of all: The game seems to be locked to 60FPS and you cannot adjust the scrolling speed or the interface at all. I actually found the text a bit too small, which didn't help my enjoyment of it.
  • Narita Boy, an absolutely incredible looking 2D scroller with RPG elements is on Kickstarter
  • Trying The SteamVR Beta On Linux Feels More Like An Early Alpha
    This past week Valve brought SteamVR on Linux into public beta. With watching the constant hype around VR on Windows, I was quite excited to finally give VR a try with having lined up an HTC Vive for testing and currently Oculus or others not offering current Linux support. I was thinking that I would have some large GPU/driver comparisons and such completed this weekend, but once actually setting up the hardware and software, I realized that wasn't going to be feasible in such short time. So for those interested in the Linux VR space, here are some of my first impressions and why I would consider the current SteamVR more like an alpha release than beta, just yet another struggle Linux gamers face, and another obstacle to overcome if Linux is to be a more serious competitor to Windows in the gaming space.

The Great Debian Iceweasel/Icedove Saga Comes to an End

The hatchet is finally completely buried. Iceweasel was laid to rest a year ago with the return of Firefox to Debian. Now, Icedove gets to go gently into that good night as well, as the Thunderbird email client returns to Debian. Read more

Releases: Linux From Scratch 8.0, LEDE 17.01, 4MRescueKit 21.0

  • Linux From Scratch 8.0 and Beyond LFS 8.0 Land with GCC 6.2, GNU Binutils 2.27
    Bruce Dubbs from the LFS (Linux From Scratch) and BLFS (Beyond Linux From Scratch) projects that allow experienced users to build their own Linux-based operating systems from scratch announced the release of Linux From Scratch 8.0 and Beyond LFS 8.0. Both Linux From Scratch 8.0 and Beyond Linux From Scratch 8.0 major versions are available with and without the systemd init system, and they offer support for some of the latest GNU/Linux and Open Source components, including GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6.2.0, GNU Binutils 2.27, and Glibc (GNU C Library) 2.24.
  • OpenWRT-Forked LEDE Releases 17.01, Presents At The Embedded Linux Conf
    This week marks the 17.01.0 final release of the Linux Embedded Development Environment (LEDE). They also presented at this week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference about their project that's a fork of OpenWRT and aims for router/embedded use-cases. LEDE 17.01.0 final was released on Wednesday and modernizes many parts of its OpenWRT stack, switches to the Linux 4.4 kernel (from Linux 3.18), updates many pieces of key software, adds additional security features, improves networking support, and has a wide variety of other improvements.
  • 4MRescueKit 21.0 Has Antivirus Live CD 21.0-0.99.2, 4MRecover and 4MParted 21.0