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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Web Log: Quitter appeals to Twitter deserters

    All the hoo-hah around Twitter tweaking its timeline, shortly after ditching ‘favourites’ for ‘likes’, along with its decision to censor certain content and accounts, has left some folks weary and wary of the microblogging platform.

    If you’re planning on quitting Twitter perhaps you plan on tweeting via Quitter?

    That’s a bit of a mouthful but Quitter is an ad-free, not-for-profit alternative that runs on a volunteer basis.

  • Mejiro Update: Responsive and Improved

    As always, a Mejiro demo is available for your viewing pleasure. And you can download the latest version of the app from the project’s GitHub repository.

  • OSM Demos First Steps to Open Source MANO

    A new ETSI-based open source community, launched this week, is demonstrating its model-based approach to management and orchestration for NFV here at Mobile World Congress, hoping to build consensus and speed practical deployment of virtualization by solving its most persistent problem.

  • Connfa: An open source mobile app for conferences and events

    Connfa is an open source app for conferences and events aimed to make paper brochures a thing of the past. Yes, those large, clumsy brochures.

    Imagine you're at a conference. A nice person at the reception desk checks your ticket and hands you one of these bright and shiny paper program guides. You walk off and start circling the events you want to attend. Everything goes fine until you miss the session you wanted to go to because you confused the date, or maybe you spent ages looking for the venue. To top it all off, you forget the brochure the next day and you're pretty lost. Sound familiar?

  • Firefox: on the right fix, and why the Bugzilla breach made me proud

    At Mozilla, we keep security-sensitive bug reports confidential until the information in them is no longer dangerous. This week we’re opening to the public a group of security bugs that document a major engineering effort to remove the rocket science of writing secure browser code and make Firefox’s front-end, DOM APIs, and add-on ecosystem secure by default. It removed a whole class of security bugs in Firefox - and helped mitigate the impact of a bug-tracker breach last summer.

  • Upgrading tutorial, Gnocchi 2.0 release, and more OpenStack news

How to choose a brand name for your open source project

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OSS

When it comes to developing a new open source software project, most developers don't spend a lot of time thinking about brand strategy. After all, a great idea, solid code, and a passionate community are what really matter when you're getting a project underway.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Learn Why Node.js is an Open Source Juggernaut

    The Node.js Foundation was created last year to support the open source community involved with Node.js, which offers an asynchronous event driven framework designed to build scalable network applications.

  • What to expect from QCon London 2016

    Actually, it's mostly more of the same (in a good way)... but perhaps at a slightly amplified level -- the only change we have reflected here is to profile QCon London in the open source blog category.

    Okay yes there will be your proprietary players there too, but open source will be especially strong this year... as it is everywhere.

  • Servo Lands Its New GPU-Accelerated Rendering Backend

    Mozilla's experimental Servo web layout engine written in Rust has landed its new "WebRender" back-end that leverages GPU rendering.

    WebRender is an experimental GPU rendering back-end for Servo. WebRender tries to offload as much of the rendering work to the GPU rather than having to draw the web content via the CPU.

  • Mozilla: Real Data Encryption Requires Political Action, Not Just Code

    Mozilla took a strong stance on online privacy this week by reiterating the need for more encryption -- but also noting that, in our age of government backdoors, encryption software alone may not be enough to keep data secure.

    In a blog post, Mozilla, the organization behind Firefox and other popular open source software, declares that "encryption isn't a luxury -- it's a necessity." And it plays up the importance of projects like Let's Encrypt, a partnership Mozilla helped launch in 2014 to create an open certificate authority for encrypting websites.

  • Analysts Find Hadoop Now Entrenched in Banking, Government

    The open source Hadoop Big Data platform is not only on the rise, but it is becoming more entrenched in important sectors, including business and government. That is just one of the findings in a Research and Markets report titled "World Hadoop Market - Opportunities and Forecasts, 2014 - 2021".

    The report also finds that the global Hadoop market is expected to garner revenue of $84.6 billion by 2021, registering a CAGR of 63.4% during the period 2016 to 2021. That is nothing to shake a stick at.

    North America accounted for around 52% share of the overall market revenue in 2015, according to the report, owing to higher rate of adoption in industries such as IT, banking, and government. Europe is anticipated to witness the fastest CAGR of 65.7% during the forecast period.

  • SQLite Release 3.11.0 On 2016-02-15
  • SQLite 3.11 Brings New Features, More Optimizations

    SQLite 3.11.0 was released this week as the newest version of this widely-used, embedded SQL database library.

  • Remember WordPress' Pingbacks? The W3C wants us to use them across the whole web

    Something called Webmentions – which looks remarkably like the old WordPress pingbacks, once popular in the late 2000s – is grinding through the machinery of the mighty, and slow-moving, World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

    But don’t be deceived. Lurking behind that unassuming name lies something that might eventually offer users a way of ditching not just Facebook and Twitter but also those other massive corporations straddling the web.

  • When OpenOrg and OpenGov collide

Google and IBM Openwashing

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Google
OSS

ETSI Launches Open Source Mano Group

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OSS

A total of 23 Service Providers and Solution Vendors have announced their intent to join the Open Source MANO (OSM) Community in the Mobile World Congress being held in Barcelona focused on delivering an open source Management and Orchestration (MANO) stack aligned with ETSI NFV Information Models. OSM has been created under the umbrella of ETSI and it is an operator-led community to meet the requirements of production NFV networks such as a common Information Model (IM) that has been defined, implemented and released in open source software.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • IoT industry leaders announce open source standard group

    On Friday, a group of industry leaders making headway in the Internet of Things (IoT) market announced a cross-industry collaboration effort aimed at unlocking the massive opportunities for consumers and business with IoT devices, and ultimately a way to quickly get everyone to adopting a single open standard.

  • Coreboot Now Supports U-Boot As A Payload
  • Coreboot Receives Initial POWER8 Support
  • New Businessweek Comic Uses Open-Source Al Jazeera Code

    Businessweek just published a comic strip online by Peter Coy and Dorothy Gambrell, which also appeared in print today. It argues against Fed Chair Janet Yellen introducing negative interest rates. For online readers that find their view of the strip too constricted, the site offers a way to focus on one digestible bit at a time. Open-source software released by Al Jazeera America (AJAM) last year under the MIT license, called Pulp, allowed Bloomberg to better the reading experience without writing new code.

  • AquaJS framework for Node.js is open source and in beta

    AquaJS is a framework for Node.js that was created at Equinix, which provides carrier-neutral datacenters and Internet exchanges for interconnection. AquaJS was developed to provide a way to start microservice-based application development. It is built with open-source modules, along with a few in-house modules, such as including architecture and design, programming best practices, technology, and deployment and runtime.

  • What Should We Stop Doing? (FLOSS Community Metrics Meeting keynote)

    One trend I see underlying a big chunk of FLOSS metrics work is the desire to automate the emotional labor involved in maintainership, like figuring out how our fellow contributors are doing, making choices about where to spend mentorship time, and tracking a community's emotional tenor. But is that appropriate? What if we switched our assumptions around and used our metrics to figure out what we're spending time on more generally, and tried to find low-value programming work we could stop doing? What tools would support this, and what scenarios could play out?

  • Comparing Codes of Conduct to Copyleft Licenses (My FOSDEM Speech)

    I will briefly mention my credentials in speaking about this topic, especially since this is my first FOSDEM and many of you don't know me. I have been a participant in free and open source software communities since the late 1990s. I'm the past community manager for MediaWiki, and while at the Wikimedia Foundation, I proposed and implemented our code of conduct, which we call a Friendly Space Policy, for in-person Wikimedia technical spaces such as hackathons and conferences.

  • Joining The Document Foundation Board

    At the end of 2015 I was honoured to be elected to serve as a director of The Document Foundation — the charity that develops LibreOffice — for two years. The new Board commenced yesterday, February 18 and immediately started conducting business by selecting a Chair – Marina Latini from the LibreItalia community – and a vice-chair, the redoubtable Michael Meeks of Collabora.

    While some doubted when it was formed, with a few even mounting campaigns to undermine it for reasons I still don’t understand, The Document Foundation has quickly developed into a model for new open source community charities.

  • IBM Delivers Open Source Streaming Analytics at the Edge for Internet of Things Devices
  • IBM Open-Sources Quarks IoT Service to Its Own Gain

    Observers say while IBM open-sources its Quarks IoT analytics technology, the move may best serve IBM's own systems, services and software needs.

    IBM this week announced it was open-sourcing Quarks, a very interesting technology that enables organizations to analyze Internet of things (IoT) data locally, on gateways or at edge devices.

  • Android ROM goes open source, new IoT app, and more news
  • ATtiny Watch is Tiny

    (Chen Liang) is in the middle of building the ultimate ring watch. This thing is way cooler than the cheap stretchy one I had in the early 1990s–it’s digital, see-through, and it probably won’t turn Liang’s finger green.

  • GitHub is proprietary, therefore it is evil

    There has been a lot of noise recently on how GitHub is bad, and how developers should stop using it.

Kuhn's Paradox

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OSS
Legal

I believe this paradox is primarily driven by the cooption of software freedom by companies that ostensibly support Open Source, but have the (now extremely popular) open source almost everything philosophy.

For certain areas of software endeavor, companies dedicate enormous resources toward the authorship of new Free Software for particular narrow tasks. Often, these core systems provide underpinnings and fuel the growth of proprietary systems built on top of them. An obvious example here is OpenStack: a fully Free Software platform, but most deployments of OpenStack add proprietary features not available from a pure upstream OpenStack installation.

Meanwhile, in other areas, projects struggle for meager resources to compete with the largest proprietary behemoths. Large user-facing, server-based applications of the Service as a Software Substitute variety, along with massive social media sites like Twitter and Facebook that actively work against federated social network systems, are the two classes of most difficult culprits on this point. Even worse, most traditional web sites have now become a mix of mundane content (i.e., HTML) and proprietary Javascript programs, which are installed on-demand into the users' browser all day long, even while most of those servers run a primarily Free Software operating system.

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Open Source Interview: Former Mozilla President Li Gong on the HTML5 OS

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Moz/FF
OSS
Web

In this article, I introduce our new series—the Open Source interview—inviting you to suggest questions to ask our interviewees in a follow-up email interview. The first candidate is Li Gong, former president of Mozilla, who is now heading Acadine Technologies. They are busy launching H5OS, an open source platform for mobile and IoT.

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Tencent and Why Open Source is About to Explode in China

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OSS

One of the pioneers of the internet in China gave a highly provocative talk - asking the audience why China had yet to birth a major open source project. The consensus in the audience (polled via WeChat platform) was that China’s culture inhibited open source. I heard this in my travels throughout China.

Frankly I can see this both ways. While I see the cultural challenges everyone was telling me about, their awareness of the challenge is so tangible that it is driving leaders in the community like Tencent’s Marty Ma and TethrNet’s Kevin Yin to try just a little harder. Even if the majority of Chinese tech workers don’t quite fully get open source now, we’re seeing leaders emerge in the country willing to invest of their time and energy to change things. I wouldn’t bet against them.

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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • The future of loading CSS

    Chrome is intending to change the behaviour of link rel="stylesheet", which will be noticeable when it appears within body. The impact and benefits of this aren't clear from the blink-dev post, so I wanted to go into detail here.

  • Spark 2.0 will offer Interactive Querying of Live Data

    The next version of Apache Spark will expand on the data processing platform’s real-time data analysis capabilities, offering users the ability to perform interactive queries against live data.

    The new feature, called structured streaming, will “push Spark beyond streaming to a new class of application that do other things in real time [rather than] just analyze a stream and output another stream,” explained Matei Zaharia, Spark founder and Databricks chief technology officer, at the Spark Summit East, taking place this week in New York. “It’s a combination of streaming and interactive that isn’t really handled by current streaming engines.”

  • ‘Opinion Stage’ Plugin Sneaks Ads onto WordPress Sites

    Publishers of WordPress sites using the ‘Poll, Quiz & List by OpinionStage’ plugin, might want to check for unexpected advertisements.

  • Tallinn Saves A Bundle Using GNU/Linux

    Schools in the city of Tallinn (Estonia) are gradually moving to PC workstations running on free and open source software. A pilot in March 2014 switched 3 schools and 2 kindergartens. Students, teachers, school administration and kindergartens’ staff members are using LibreOffice, Ubuntu-Linux and other open source tools.

  • Open source legal citation manual raises Harvard Law Review Association’s hackles

    It's a safe bet that the people behind the esteemed “Bluebook” find nothing cute about “Baby Blue,” the new online, open source legal citation manual that went live earlier this month.

  • Google green-lights Go 1.6

    In a blog post, Google's Andrew Gerrand called the HTTP/2 support "the most significant change" in the release, with the revision bringing the new protocol's benefits to projects like the Go-based Caddy Web server. He otherwise described the upgrade, the seventh major stable release of the language, as more incremental than Go 1.5, which was released last August.

    The team has tinkered with garbage collection, featuring lower pauses than version 1.5, particularly for large programs, but programs may not necessarily run faster. "As always, the changes are so general and varied that precise statements about performance are difficult to make. Some programs may run faster, some slower," according to release notes.

  • Version control isn't just for programmers

    So that's why I've personally chosen Mercurial. That said, there's an analogous process in most of these other systems for what I'm going to describe here. So if you'd prefer to use Git or Fossil, I say that's great. At least you're using something. That puts you a step ahead of most other creatives.

  • Supporting Beep Beep Yarr!

    Some of you may be familiar with LinuxVoice magazine. They put an enormous amount of effort in creating a high quality, feature-packed magazine with a small team. They are led by Graham Morrison who I have known for many years and who is one of the most thoughtful, passionate, and decent human beings I have ever met.

    Well, the same team are starting an important new project called Beep Beep Yarr!. It is essentially a Kickstarter crowd-funded children’s book that is designed to teach core principles of programming to kids. The project not just involves the creation of the book, but also a parent’s guide and an interactive app to help kids engage with the principles in the book.

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GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday
    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.
  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today
    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer! Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!
  • Happy birthday, GNOME!
    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!
  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday
    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.