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OSS

OpenStack From Texas

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OpenStack at Red Hat, Canonical

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  • University of Cambridge Selects Red Hat to Support OpenStack-Based HPC Initiatives

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that the University of Cambridge, one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious academic institutions, has selected Red Hat to support its OpenStack-based high performance computing (HPC) initiatives. In addition to deploying Red Hat OpenStack Platform for its HPC-as-a-Service offering, the University of Cambridge also plans to collaborate with Red Hat to bring HPC capabilities to the upstream OpenStack community.

  • Using modern open source as a tactical weapon | #OpenStack

    Gone are the days when the open-source community was a guerrilla organization of free-spirited independent experts working together, according to Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth. He sees a very different modern community, where tactical positioning by large organizations is the new standard behavior and open source is viewed as a weapon to be used to go faster than standard development processes.

Thinking Big: Supporting Open Source for Decades to Come

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Individuals start open source projects because it matters to them. Whether motivated by passion, interest, necessity, curiosity or fame, projects are often started by individuals who want to build better software. Do better work. Have an impact. See their code in the world’s best technology and products.

Because open source today makes up an ever increasing footprint in technology infrastructure and products, we have a responsibility to these individuals and the community and industry at large to support this work and build practices and processes that sustain the world’s greatest shared technologies for the long term.

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Leftovers: OSS

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  • Tuesday's security updates
  • LiveJournal creator Brad Fitzpatrick details his open-source digital life backup system

    The amount of digital data we are creating every day is mind-boggling. But the photos we take, tweets we send, places we check into and other digital detritus is often siloed into proprietary formats from various companies stored on disparate sites across the web.

  • Open365 Is a Free Open-Source Office 365, Spotify May Have Been Hacked… [Tech News Digest]
  • Securing Visibility into Open Source Code

    The Internet runs on open source code. Linux, Apache Tomcat, OpenSSL, MySQL, Drupal and WordPress are built on open source. Everyone, every day, uses applications that are either open source or include open source code; commercial applications typically have only 65 per cent custom code. Development teams can easily use 100 or more open source libraries, frameworks tools and code snippets, when building an application.

  • In the open-source age, ‘no excuse to dictate tech’ | #OpenStack

    2016 marks the largest OpenStack Summit yet. With more than 7,600 attendees in Austin, Texas, and numerous partnerships, it is safe to say OpenStack has arrived. Back at home in Texas, OpenStack is flourishing amid its native state’s southern hospitality.

    “I never thought I’d become an open licensing geek in my life,” said Mark Collier, founder and COO of OpenStack Foundation. Collier joined Jonathan Bryce, executive director at OpenStack, for an interview with Stu Miniman and Brian Gracely, cohosts of theCUBE, from the SiliconANGLE Media team.

  • Release of GNU remotecontrol - Version 2.0
  • GNU Remotecontrol 2.0 Released

    One of the less talked about GNU projects is GNU remotecontrol.

  • Keynote Speech at the Closing Plenary session of Net Futures 2016, Brussels

    Europe’s relative weakness in digital consumer markets, in web and internet services and notably in data platforms is becoming a major challenge to the whole economy.

    In addition, users feel that proprietary platforms do not satisfy their needs. They get locked-in to a specific provider and have very little influence on the evolution of the platform.

  • Jenkins 2.0 Adds Pipeline-as-Code for Continuous Delivery

    We tend to talk about “CI/CD” (continuous integration / continuous delivery) as though it were one thing, and there wasn’t a slash between them. Even when Jez Humble and David Farley published a book on the latter to distinguish it as a goal unto itself, the book’s presentation presents it as building on the “foundation” of CI, or a “natural extension” of CI. You don’t have to look much further to find CD presented as the “logical evolution” of CI. More than once, Microsoft has presented CD as the magic button you push when you’re done with CI. And last and/or least, IBM has presented CD as CI except with a “D.”

  • New functional programming language can generate C, Python code for apps

    Researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Computer Science recently unveiled Futhark, an open source functional programming language designed for creating code that runs on GPUs, for use in machine learning and other high-performance applications.

    Futhark is meant to be more convenient to use than standard C/C++ frameworks for programming GPUs. It can automatically generate both C and Python code to be integrated with existing apps.

Dell embraces open-source networking with new lines

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Yesterday, Dell Networking announced -- in partnership with Verizon, Big Switch Networks, Dell, and Red Hat -- that it had released the largest known network function virtualization (NFV) OpenStack cloud deployment across five of Verizon's US data centers.

Not resting on its laurels, today Dell announced that it's driving ahead with its Linux-based Operating System 10 (OS10) development. Underneath the base module is the Open Compute Project Switch Abstraction Interface, a platform is designed for large scale data centers. Dell is also integrating OS10 with open-source community projects including Open Compute Project (OCP) and Microsoft's Software for Open Networking in the Cloud (SONiC).

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OpenStack News

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  • At Platform9, OpenStack-as-a-Service is the Focus

    Among the many approaches seen in the OpenStack arena, OpenStack as a service is emerging as an interesting choice. Platform9, which focuses on OpenStack-based private cloudy, has announced a new release of its Platform9 Managed OpenStack, which is a SaaS-based solution with integration for single sign-on (SSO) solutions. The company also updated its private-cloud-as-a service offering from OpenStack Juno to OpenStack Liberty.

  • OpenStack by the numbers: Who’s using open source clouds and for what?

    The latest bi-annual survey data of OpenStack users shows a continuing march of the open source cloud software into mainstream of enterprises, but also the project’s continued challenges related to ease of deployment and management.

  • OpenStack and Amazon’s cloud: Friends or foes?

    Four years ago tensions between OpenStack and Amazon Web Services were at a high. The open source cloud computing platform was being developed as an alternative to AWS’s and members of the community spoke despairingly about the public cloud behemoth.

    Fast-forward to today, and the relationship between these two cloud platforms seems quite undefined.

5 humanitarian crises where open source projects aimed to bring stability

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An annoyed user couldn’t fix his printer as the printer’s source code wasn’t available to users. This was the reason that led to the start of the open source movement. Organizations have saved billions of dollars and man hours by collaborating and innovating on the open source platform. The open source software has been used almost everywhere, and most importantly, technologists are taking full advantage of it when the world needs it to solve humanitarian problems.

Here are some humanitarian crises that technologists have built open source platforms for, just to give a new life to those badly affected by it.

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Korean Government Developed Open-source Cloud Computing Platform

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On April 26, the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning and the National Information Society Agency (NIA) unveiled the first version of the PaaS-TA, which is an open-source platform as a service for cloud computing service development.

The ministry worked on the cloud computing platform with the Ministry of the Interior from March 2014. At present, the domestic PaaS sector is characterized by various companies’ different development environments and a low level of compatibility, which have caused software service providers to repeat their development processes for services on different platforms.

The South Korean government developed the PaaS-TA at this time in order to address this problem. Supporting at least six development languages and diverse cloud computing infrastructure services, it is open-source software and can be utilized by anyone. In addition, it comes with the standard e-government framework and is capable of realizing e-government services on the cloud computing platform.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OpenStack Summit

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More in Tux Machines

Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward

I run many operating systems every day, from macOS, to Windows 7 and 10, to more Linux desktop distributions than you can shake a stick at. And, once more, as a power-user's power user, I've found the latest version of Linux Mint to be the best of the best. Why? Let's start with the basics. MacOS has been shown to have the worst bug I've ever seen in an operating system: The macOS High Sierra security hole that lets anyone get full administrative control. Windows, old and new, continues to have multiple security bugs every lousy month. Linux? Sure, it has security problems. How many of these bugs have had serious desktop impacts? Let me see now. None. Yes, that would be zero. Read more

Today in Techrights

Security: NSA, Microsoft Debacles, and FOSS Updates

  • Script Recovers Event Logs Doctored by NSA Hacking Tool
    Security researchers have found a way to reverse the effects of an NSA hacking utility that deletes event logs from compromised machines. Last week, Fox-IT published a Python script that recovers event log entries deleted using the "eventlogedit" utility that's part of DanderSpritz, a supposed NSA cyber-weapon that was leaked online by a hacking group known as the Shadow Brokers. According to Fox-IT, they found a flaw in the DanderSpritz log cleaner when they realized the utility does not actually delete event log entries, but only unreferences them, merging entries together.
  • Pre-Installed Keylogger Discovered on Hundreds of HP Laptop Models
    A keylogger that can help record pretty much every keystroke on the computer has been discovered on HP’s devices, with a security researcher revealing that hundreds of laptop models come with this hidden software pre-installed. Michael Myng says in an analysis of the keylogger that the malicious code is hiding in the Synaptics Touchpad software and he actually discovered it when looking into ways to control the keyboard backlight on his laptop. According to his findings, the keylogger isn’t activated by default, but it can be turned on by any cybercriminals that get access to the system. The list of affected models includes hundreds of laptops like EliteBook, ProBook, Spectre, Zbook, Envy, and Pavilion.
  • Laptop touchpad driver included extra feature: a keylogger [Ed: This is the second time in recent times HP gets caught with keyloggers; This is no accident, it's intentional.]
    Flaws in software often offer a potential path for attackers to install malicious software, but you wouldn't necessarily expect a hardware vendor to include potentially malicious software built right into its device drivers. But that's exactly what a security researcher found while poking around the internals of a driver for a touchpad commonly used on HP notebook computers—a keystroke logger that could be turned on with a simple change to its configuration in the Windows registry.
  • Microsoft Needed 110 Days to Fix Critical Security Bug After First Ignoring It
    Microsoft needed more than 100 days to fix a critical credential leak in Dynamics 365 after the company originally ignored the bug report and only reacted after being warned that details could go public. Software engineer Matthias Gliwka explains in a long blog post that he discovered and reported a security flaw in Microsoft’s Customer Relationship Manager and Enterprise Resource Planning software in August, but the software giant refused to fix it on claims that administrator credentials would be required. Gliwka says he came across a wildcard transport layer security (TLS) certificate that also included the private key, which would in turn expose communications by anyone who could decrypt traffic. The developer says that extracting the certificate grants access to any sandbox environment, with absolutely no warning or message displayed to clients.
  • UK Spy Agency Finds Severe Flaw in Microsoft Antivirus in Kaspersky Bye-Bye Push
  • Security updates for Monday

OSS Leftovers

  • What is a blockchain smart contract?
    Now, in a blockchain, the important thing is that once the state has changed, you then ensure it's recorded on the blockchain so that it's public and nobody can change or challenge it. But there are other uses for blockchain technology, as I explained in "Is blockchain a security topic?" Permissionless systems, often referred to as distributed ledger technologies (DLTs) are a great fit for non-transactional state models, largely because the sort of people who are interested in them are closed groups of organisations that want to have complex sets of conditions met before they move to the next state. These aren't, by the tightest definition, blockchains. Banks and other financial institutions may be the most obvious examples where DLTs are gaining traction, but they are very useful in supply chain sectors, for instance, where you may have conditions around changing market rates, availability, and shipping times or costs, which may all play into the final price of the commodity or service being provided.
  • Running a successful open source project
    Running an open source project is easy. All you have to do is make your source code available and you’re open source, right? Well, maybe. Ultimately, whether or not an open source project is successful depends on your definition of success. Regardless of your definition, creating an open source project can be a lot of work. If you have goals regarding adoption, for example, then you need to be prepared to invest. While open source software is “free as in beer”, it’s not really free: time and energy are valuable resources and these valuable resources need to be invested in the project. So, how do you invest those resources?
  • New package repositories are now enabled by default
    During this year’s coding sprint in Toulouse (which I was able to attend, thanks to being in Europe on a study-abroad program), I spent a lot of time massaging HaikuPorts to generate a consistent-enough state of packages for us to switch to them by default, and then making the in-tree changes necessary for the switch. Thanks to this and mmlr’s comprehensive overhaul of the HaikuPorter Buildmaster over the past couple months, we have finally switched to the new repositories by default as of hrev51620. If you’ve installed a nightly image from after this, you should be able to just pkgman full-sync and upgrade away.
  • Haiku OS Is Very Close To Their Long Awaited Beta, New Repository Working
    The BeOS-inspired Haiku operating system should be issuing its long-awaited beta release by early 2018. For months there has been talk of the long-awaited beta for Haiku OS while it looks like roughly within the next month we should be actually seeing this milestone.
  • DeepVariant: Tool to call out variants in sequencing data goes open source
    Megan Molteni, Wired, decoded, at least, the very nature of the challenge to know more about our human puzzle. "Today, a teaspoon of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA. But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over." DeepVariant was developed by researchers from the Google Brain team, focused on AI techniques, and Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences. It is based on the same neural network for image recognition, but DeepVariant, is now making headlines not for cat IDs but as a way to scan a genetic code for mutations. DeepVariant has gone open source. The GitHub definition of DeepVariant: "an analysis pipeline that uses a deep neural network to call genetic variants from next-generation DNA sequencing data."
  • Open source VPN clients vs VPN provider apps: which is better?
    Power users love open source software for its transparency and flexibility – but what about open source VPN software? Are there any open source VPN clients that can stand up to being compared with the more popular VPN apps from premium providers like ExpressVPN, VyprVPN, IPVanish or NordVPN? The short answer is... not really. But the long answer depends a lot on your level of technical know-how, patience, and where you’re willing to place your trust.
  • Coreboot Conference 2017 Videos Now Available
    For those interested in the open-source Coreboot project that serves as a replacement to proprietary UEFI/BIOS, the videos from their European Coreboot Conference are now available. The European Coreboot Conference 2017 (ECC'17) was held in Bochum, Germany back at the end of October.
  • Election night hackathon supports civic engagement
    On November 7, 2017, members of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) community came together for the annual Election Night Hackathon held in the Simone Center for Student Innovation. This marked the seventh anniversary of a civic tradition for the FOSS @ MAGIC community, in which students and faculty analyze civic problems in the local community, state, or country and propose a project to address them. MAGIC Center faculty and event organizers are on hand to help students choose open source licenses and publish and share their code.
  • What is a blockchain smart contract?
    Now, in a blockchain, the important thing is that once the state has changed, you then ensure it's recorded on the blockchain so that it's public and nobody can change or challenge it. But there are other uses for blockchain technology, as I explained in "Is blockchain a security topic?" Permissionless systems, often referred to as distributed ledger technologies (DLTs) are a great fit for non-transactional state models, largely because the sort of people who are interested in them are closed groups of organisations that want to have complex sets of conditions met before they move to the next state. These aren't, by the tightest definition, blockchains. Banks and other financial institutions may be the most obvious examples where DLTs are gaining traction, but they are very useful in supply chain sectors, for instance, where you may have conditions around changing market rates, availability, and shipping times or costs, which may all play into the final price of the commodity or service being provided.
  • Running a successful open source project
    Running an open source project is easy. All you have to do is make your source code available and you’re open source, right? Well, maybe. Ultimately, whether or not an open source project is successful depends on your definition of success. Regardless of your definition, creating an open source project can be a lot of work. If you have goals regarding adoption, for example, then you need to be prepared to invest. While open source software is “free as in beer”, it’s not really free: time and energy are valuable resources and these valuable resources need to be invested in the project. So, how do you invest those resources?
  • New package repositories are now enabled by default
    During this year’s coding sprint in Toulouse (which I was able to attend, thanks to being in Europe on a study-abroad program), I spent a lot of time massaging HaikuPorts to generate a consistent-enough state of packages for us to switch to them by default, and then making the in-tree changes necessary for the switch. Thanks to this and mmlr’s comprehensive overhaul of the HaikuPorter Buildmaster over the past couple months, we have finally switched to the new repositories by default as of hrev51620. If you’ve installed a nightly image from after this, you should be able to just pkgman full-sync and upgrade away.
  • Haiku OS Is Very Close To Their Long Awaited Beta, New Repository Working
    The BeOS-inspired Haiku operating system should be issuing its long-awaited beta release by early 2018. For months there has been talk of the long-awaited beta for Haiku OS while it looks like roughly within the next month we should be actually seeing this milestone.
  • DeepVariant: Tool to call out variants in sequencing data goes open source
    Megan Molteni, Wired, decoded, at least, the very nature of the challenge to know more about our human puzzle. "Today, a teaspoon of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA. But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over." DeepVariant was developed by researchers from the Google Brain team, focused on AI techniques, and Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences. It is based on the same neural network for image recognition, but DeepVariant, is now making headlines not for cat IDs but as a way to scan a genetic code for mutations. DeepVariant has gone open source. The GitHub definition of DeepVariant: "an analysis pipeline that uses a deep neural network to call genetic variants from next-generation DNA sequencing data."
  • Open source VPN clients vs VPN provider apps: which is better?
    Power users love open source software for its transparency and flexibility – but what about open source VPN software? Are there any open source VPN clients that can stand up to being compared with the more popular VPN apps from premium providers like ExpressVPN, VyprVPN, IPVanish or NordVPN? The short answer is... not really. But the long answer depends a lot on your level of technical know-how, patience, and where you’re willing to place your trust.