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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

F-Droid, Copperhead, Guardian Project partner to create a security-focused, Android-based ecosystem

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Android
OSS
  • F-Droid, Copperhead, Guardian Project partner to create a security-focused, Android-based ecosystem

    Google’s Android operating system may be based on open source software, but most Android phones ship with a lot of proprietary apps and services (like Google’s own Gmail, Maps, and Play Store). But there are a number of initiatives designed to make Android more open… and many also claim to make it more secure.

  • Copperhead, F-Droid & Guardian Project start partnership for open, secure mobile ecosystem

    Copperhead, The Guardian Project, and F-Droid have announced a new partnership and proposed a crowdfunding campaign, hoping to raise money to create an "open, verifiably secure mobile ecosystem of software, services and hardware" - or in English, a secure phone anyone can buy and use straight out of the box.

    “Through a future planned crowdfunded and commercial offering, the partnership will provide affordable off-the-shelf solutions, including device hardware and self-hosted app and update distribution servers, for any individual and organizations looking for complete mobile stacks they can trust.” reads the announcement.

  • Open Source CopperheadOS Project Accepts Bitcoin Donations

    There is no denying the Android operating system could use a fair amount of tweaks to make things far more secure for its users. Whether or not CopperheadOS will be the answer, remains to be seen, but the ecosystem has a few things going for it. What is even more interesting is how this collaboration with Guardian Project and F-Droid is accepting Bitcoin donations to fund development as well.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • SxSW panel on the value of open source

    One question I get often is: "How can I build a business around something I'm giving away for free?" So, I wanted to attend the panel at SxSW this year called Don't open source like a n00b, focused on how to make a project or product open source. We've seen many projects successfully do open source—like Linux, Wordpress, and Koha—but how does a company like Booz Allen Hamilton jump from being a proprietary company to open sourcing their first product?

    Project Jellyfish was developed here in Austin by Booz Allen Hamilton; it's software that can be described as a cloud brokering solution. The team there realized that many vendors are open sourcing their applications and that a lot of the new, cool stuff is being developed in the open. So, they made the decision to make Project Jellyfish open source, hoping their developers would more interested in participating. But, they still had to convince their partners to spend money to develop something they were going to give away for free.

  • How Open Source is Changing Data Center Networking

    Last June, AT&T went all-in on this bet, joining with the Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) and the Open Network Operating System (ONOS) Project to form what’s now called Central Office Re-imagined as a Datacenter (CORD, formerly “Re-architected”). Its mission is to make telco infrastructure available as a service in an analogous fashion to IaaS for cloud service providers.

  • Kubernetes 1.2 Offers Rolling Updates, Persistent Volumes

    At the Google GCP Next conference last week in San Francisco, the company demonstrated how it was possible with Kubernetes to update a heavily used distributed application while keeping that app running.

    For a Kubernetes 1.2 on-stage demo, Greg DeMichillie, director of program management for Google Cloud Platform spun up a service and then used load testing software to dispatch 20,000 requests-per-second to the service.

  • Way to Go, FCC. Now Manufacturers Are Locking Down Routers

    Hey, remember when the FCC reassured us last year that it wasn’t going to lock down Wi-Fi routers? And everyone breathed a sigh of relief, because custom router firmware is actually a really good thing? Sure, it’s fun to improve your router by extending the range or making your network friendlier for guests. But open firmware is important for other reasons: it enables critical infrastructure, from emergency communications for disaster relief and building free community access points to beefing up personal security.

Are you legally open source compliant?

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OSS
Legal

Meeting legal requirements is one of the key elements that large software companies factor in to their release cycles. They have teams that check for software patents that may impact their code, make sure that every copyright is acknowledged and look at the detailed usage clauses in any third-party software that they use.

One of the reasons for doing this is to avoid expensive litigation from companies often referred to as patent trolls. These are companies that have purchased large software patent libraries. Their business model is to then use those libraries to bring lawsuits against developers and over the last decade we’ve seen a number of high profile lawsuits against companies such as IBM, Microsoft, Google and others. Some of these have been dismissed by the courts but others have been upheld costing hundreds of millions of dollars in both fines and costs.

While open source developers might think that they are immune from this type of issue they are not. It may be that a piece of software that has been released as open source is later alleged to have infringed a software patent. This would mean that anyone using that software could be found guilty of an infringement.

To help reduce the impact of patent claims Google, IBM, Red Hat, SUSE, NEC, Philips and Sony created the Open Innovation Network. The goal was to create a pool of defensive patents that could be used to protect Linux and developers using Linux. This has been successful with over 1946 companies signing up to the OIN to use their patents to defend themselves from attack.

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qBittorrent 3.3.4 Free BitTorrent Client Adds a "Hide Zero Values" Option, More

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OSS

The development team behind the popular qBittorrent free open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client software announced today, March 29, 2016, the release of qBittorrent 3.3.4.

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FFmpeg 3.0 "Einstein" Free Multimedia Backend Gets Its First Point Release

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OSS

Today, March 29, 2016, the major FFmpeg 3.0 "Einstein" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework received its first maintenance release, version 3.0.1.

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Linux Foundation and Open Source Blockchain

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Linux
OSS

The TODO Group and the Linux Foundation: Marrying open source and the enterprise

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Linux
OSS

Using open-source software is easy, getting your company to integrate open-source development is hard. The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group aim to change this.

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Quali Courts DevOps Community with Open Source Plugins and Libraries

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OSS

Quali hopes to forge stronger connections with the developer community by contributing plugins for its DevOps cloud sandbox platform as open source code, a move the company announced today.

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MIT Media Lab makes open source the default

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OSS

MIT Media Lab has declared open source to be the preferred software licensing model for its projects. According to Joichi Ito, Director of the renowned interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the academic institution can achieve greater impact by sharing its work.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel and Graphics: ZenStates, AMDGPU, RADV, Vulkan, NVIDIA

  • ZenStates Allows Adjusting Zen P-States, Other Tweaking Under Linux
    ZenStates is an independent effort to offer P-States-based overclocking from the Linux desktop of AMD Ryzen processors and other tuning. ZenStates-Linux is an open-source Python script inspired by some available Windows programs for offering Ryzen/Zen CPU overclocking from the desktop by manipulating the performance states of the processor.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets A Final Batch Of Changes Before Linux 4.15
    The AMDGPU DC display code has a final batch of feature updates that were sent in this weekend for DRM-Next staging and is the last set besides fixes for the "DC" code for the 4.15 target.
  • Valve Developer Lands VK_EXT_global_priority For RADV Vulkan Driver
  • Vulkan 1.0.64 Adds In Another AMD-Developed Extension
    Vulkan 1.0.64 is out this weekend as the newest specification refinement to this high-performance graphics/compute API. As usual, most of the changes for this minor Vulkan revision are just documentation clarifications and corrections. This week's update brings just under a dozen fixes.
  • NVIDIA TX2 / Tegra186 Display Support Isn't Ready For Linux 4.15
    While the Jetson TX2 has been out since this past March and it's a phenomenal ARM development board, sadly the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver support for it still isn't ready with the mainline Linux kernel. Thierry Reding of NVIDIA sent in the Tegra DRM driver changes for DRM-Next that in turn is staged for Linux 4.15. Reding commented that there is prepatory work for the TX2 (Tegra186) but it's not all ready for upstream yet.

Ubuntu: Mir running on Fedora and Ubuntu 17.10 Guidance

  • Mir running on Fedora
    Last week we released Mir 0.28 and this week we settled down to tidy up a few bugs fixes and feature requests that didn’t make the release. I’ve started collecting these for a Mir 0.28.1 release to come in the next few weeks. The most interesting of these comes from conversations at the Ubuntu Rally: there were several requests from community members around getting Mir working (or even building!) on other distributions.
  • Ubuntu Developer Gets Mir Running On Fedora
    Lead Mir developer Alan Griffiths has spent the time getting the Mir display server running on Fedora. This is part of a broader feature request of getting Mir running on more Linux distributions than just Ubuntu. The changes to get Mir running on at least Fedora should be merged for the upcoming Mir 0.28.1 point release. Mir 0.28.1 will also incorporate other bug fixes.
  • How To Remove the Unity Desktop from Ubuntu 17.10
  • 9 Things to do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10
  • How To Install Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

Purism Librem 5 Linux Smartphone Campaign Set To End At Around $2 Million

Tomorrow marks the end of the crowdfunding campaign for Purism's Librem 5 smartphone campaign. The campaign is looking like it will close at around two million dollars with the current tally as of this morning being at $1,962,517 in funds raised for this effort to build an original GNU/Linux smartphone stack with either GNOME Shell or KDE Plasma Mobile comprising the UI/UX elements. Read more

Games: The Coma: Recut, Mushroom Wars 2 and Team Fortress 2