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OSS

Open Source Giant Red Hat Launches First Blockchain Initiative

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Red Hat
OSS

Red Hat officially announced the OpenShift Blockchain Initiative today, a new development effort aimed at assisting financial firms as they embark on proofs-of-concept and other trials related to the emerging technology.

Under the OpenShift Blockchain Initiative, Red Hat customers can build hosted blockchain applications using tools provided by independent solutions vendors (ISVs) focused on the industry, while taking advantage of the company's managed support services.

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Open Source Replacements for Expensive Applications

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OSS

In recent years, cloud computing has transformed the ways that people purchase software, but it hasn't necessarily made it more affordable.

Today, many applications are available on a software as a service (SaaS) basis and require a monthly fee. Over time, these fees add up, and in many cases, software companies earn more from these subscriptions than they did from boxed or downloadable software. In fact, IDC estimates that by 2018, just the enterprise portion of the SaaS market will generate $22.6 billion in annual revenue.

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Google FOSS

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Google
OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • 20 Popular Open Source Alternatives to Expensive Software
  • Impostor syndrome and the Dunning-Kruger effect in communities

    At OSCON 2016 in Austin, Jessica Rose, developer relations at Dream Factory, will give a talk called Impostor syndrome and individual competence. In this interview, she explains the role the Dunning-Kruger effect plays in open source communities, and offers tips for managers to help them recognize when candidates under- or over-estimate their own skill levels.

  • How to start a ChickTech chapter

    ChickTech is dedicated to introducing young girls to tech careers. It's best known for its high school program, in which teacher-nominated students are set up with workshops, mentorships, and job shadowing opportunities.

  • Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W13
  • ignuit 2.24.2 released

    A "drill" mode has been added, category navigation is now possible when the category pane is switched off, and several bugs related to the new category properties dialog have been fixed. The user manual has also been updated.

  • [Older] US government commits to publish publicly financed software under Free Software licenses

    At the end of last week, the White House published a draft for a Source Code Policy. The policy requires every public agency to publish their custom-build software as Free Software for other public agencies as well as the general public to use, study, share and improve the software. At the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) we believe that the European Union, and European member states should implement similar policies. Therefore we are interested in your feedback to the US draft.

  • Think Globally, Build Locally With These Open-Source Recycling Machines

    Walk on almost any beach or look on the side of most roads and you’ll see the bottles, bags, and cast-off scraps of a polymeric alphabet soup – HDPE, PET, ABS, PP, PS. Municipal recycling programs might help, but what would really solve the problem would be decentralized recycling, and these open-source plastics recycling machines might just jump-start that effort.

  • A spiritual successor to Aaron Swartz is angering publishers all over again

    Stop us if you’ve heard this before: a young academic with coding savvy has become frustrated with the incarceration of information. Some of the world's best research continues to be trapped behind subscriptions and paywalls. This academic turns activist, and this activist then plots and executes the plan. It's time to free information from its chains—to give it to the masses free of charge. Along the way, this research Robin Hood is accused of being an illicit, criminal hacker.

    This, of course, describes the tale of the late Aaron Swartz. His situation captured the Internet’s collective attention as the data crusader attacked research paywalls. Swartz was notoriously charged as a hacker for trying to free millions of articles from popular academic hub JSTOR. At age 26, he tragically committed suicide just ahead of his federal trial in 2013.

    But suddenly in 2016, the tale has new life. The Washington Post decries it as academic research's Napster moment, and it all stems from a 27-year-old bioengineer turned Web programmer from Kazakhstan (who's living in Russia). Just as Swartz did, this hacker is freeing tens of millions of research articles from paywalls, metaphorically hoisting a middle finger to the academic publishing industry, which, by the way, has again reacted with labels like "hacker" and "criminal."

  • GitHub Now Lets You Block Troublesome Users From Public Repositories

    GitHub is a git repository service widely used to host open source software projects. The beauty of open source projects on GitHub is that people can collaborate to edit and improve the code. Trouble is, with multiple people working on the same project, it can get a bit chaotic and one uncooperative coder can ruin it for everybody. This is why GitHub is now letting project owners of public repositories block abusive users.

  • Free ANSI Event to focus on open source and its community impact.

GitHub Forum Highlights Public Views on Open Source in U.S. Government

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OSS

What's good about open source software, what are its limits and how should it be used in government? These are issues that the public is now debating vigorously in a new forum created by the U.S. government following its recent push to make more government-owned code open.

The backstory: Last month, the federal government used GitHub to solicit public comments on draft guidelines that would require federal agencies to make more use of open source code. Among other requirements, the proposal would mandate that at least twenty percent of federally owned code be released as open source.

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Also: White House proposes government open-source software

Arduino aims $35, WiFi-enabled hacker board at IoT apps

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OSS

Arduino LLC debuted a $35 IoT focused MKR1000 board, supported with an Arduino IoT site, and soon, an Arduino Create code editor and Arduino Cloud platform.

At Arduino Day this week in Berkeley, Calif., Arduino LLC’s cofounders Massimo Banzi, David Mellis, and Tom Igoe hailed the company’s new MKR1000 board as combining the functionality of the Zero and the WiFi Shield. They were referring not to the Linux-driven Raspberry Pi Zero, but rather the microcontroller-based Arduino Zero follow on to the Uno, and the relatively new WiFi Shield for Arduino boards.

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Google open-sources Walt, a tool that measures lag for touch and voice commands

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Google
OSS

Google today talked for the first time about Walt, a piece of software that people can use to figure out how long it takes for a device to respond to touch or voice input. Google has been using Walt to do performance tests on Android devices and Chromebooks, and now the software is available under an open source Apache license on GitHub.

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Galicia: open source allows IT standardisation

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OSS

The combination of open source software and open standards allows public administrations to standardise enterprise IT systems, according to the employment agency of the government of the autonomous region of Galicia (Spain).

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • 1btn: A Powerful, Open Source, And Hackable Button For The Internet
  • 11 Excellent Open Source Solutions for Home Automation

    Home Automation software is software that lets you control and monitor common home and office appliances using a computer. Home automation used to be confined to turning on and off lights and appliances. But the possibilities are much wider letting users build a wireless network, automate TV and hi-fi, monitor pets when you are away, set up an answering system, create a weather station - integrating an abundance of different home automation technologies into one.

    Many home automation systems use proprietary networking protocols. The protocols used will be specific to the company that developed the system. The software company may favor such an approach as it ties the customer to their products only. However, this can only be detriment to the user of the home automation system. It is therefore important to evaluate a home automation system to ensure that it is built on open protocols. All of these solutions are released under an open source license.

    Do not think home automation is just for geeks. It is now mainstream and a burgeoning industry. Become an home automation expert and try out these finest open source software for home automation. There are some real gems here. Many users flock to Domoticz and openHAB, but one of the others listed here may be a better fit for your requirements.

  • eBay Joins FIDO, Contributes Open-Source Authentication Server

    The FIDO Alliance, which is working to deliver stronger forms of authentication for online access, expands such efforts with eBay's help.
    The FIDO (Fast Identity Online) Alliance is gaining momentum, with eBay joining the effort and contributing a new open-source Universal Authentication Framework compliant server.

    FIDO is a multistakeholder initiative whose aim is to enable stronger forms of authentication for online access. The big milestone event for FIDO occurred in December 2014 when the group announced the Universal Second Factor (U2F) and UAF 1.0 specifications.

  • Studying the relationship between remixing & learning

    With more than 10 million users, the Scratch online community is the largest online community where kids learn to program. Since it was created, a central goal of the community has been to promote “remixing” — the reworking and recombination of existing creative artifacts. As the video above shows, remixing programming projects in the current web-based version of Scratch is as easy is as clicking on the “see inside” button in a project web-page, and then clicking on the “remix” button in the web-based code editor. Today, close to 30% of projects on Scratch are remixes.

  • The French Revolution Is In Doubt In 2016

    The basic concepts of FLOSS are now in the public eye. The public has been using FLOSS browsers and operating systems for a decade or longer and they know it. Will they be fooled? Will they be afraid? I don’t think so. Further, any politician who thinks this is a non-issue is about to receive an education.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Book Review: FreeBSD Mastery: Specialty Filesystem

    A filesystem is nothing but the data structures that an operating system uses to keep track of files on a disk. The filesystem stores pictures, music, videos, accounting data and more. The different operating system comes with various filesystems. One may need to move data between FreeBSD and other Unix-like systems like OS X or Linux based devices. Knowing all about filesystem help us to archive or move data between system. The “FreeBSD Mastery: Specialty Filesystem” is an essential, practical and well-written book.

  • Open Platform: Open Systems, Open Source, Open APIs… Open Opportunities?

    The panacea of true data optionality and portability is technically possible today, but is being held back by a range of factors at vendors and end-user firms. Andrew Miller, managing director of consultancy Net Effect, highlights the key gating factors and encourages us to take a leap of faith that will deliver benefits for all.

  • Strontiium-90 and a Raspberry Pi to teach college students, Thyrosim for thyroid treatment, and more news
  • Open Source Trend Overtakes CPUs

    Open source may be ready to consume a category of products that has thus far eluded the trend: microprocessors.

    Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Bologna have collaborated on the development of an open source microprocessor designed specifically for use in wearable devices and other small Internet of Things (IoT) things.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: OpenStack Summit Vancouver, IBM Index, Eclipse CheConf 2018

  • OpenStack Summit Vancouver '18: Vote for Speakers
    The next OpenStack Summit takes place again in Vancouver (BC, Canada), May 21-25, 2018. The "Vote for Presentations" period started. All proposals are up for community votes. The deadline for your vote is will end February 25 at 11:59pm PST (February 26th at 8:59am CET)
  • IBM Index: A Community Event for Open Source Developers
    The first-ever INDEX community event, happening now in San Francisco, is an open developer conference featuring sessions on topics including artificial intelligence, machine learning, analytics, cloud native, containers, APIs, languages, and more.
  • Eclipse CheConf 2018 – Join the live stream February 21st at 10 am EST
    2017 was a fantastic year for the Che project, with more contributors, more commits, and more usage – this solidified Che’s position as the leading developer workspace server and browser IDE. Eclipse Che users logged over 7 million hours of public Che usage (plus more in private installs). We’ll discuss the growing cloud development market, Che’s position in it, and the exciting changes we’re planning for 2018.

Kernel News and Linux Foundation

  • Linux Kernel Module Growth
    The Linux kernel grows at an amazing pace, each kernel release adds more functionality, more drivers and hence more kernel modules. I recently wondered what the trend was for kernel module growth per release, so I performed module builds on kernels v2.6.24 through to v4.16-rc2 for x86-64 to get a better idea of growth rates...
  • A Linux Kernel Driver Is Being Worked On For Valve's Steam Controller
    Right now to make most use of the Steam Controller on Linux you need to be using the Steam client while there have been independent user-space programs like SC-Controller to enable Steam Controller functionality without the Steam client running. A new and independent effort is a Linux kernel driver for the Steam Controller. Through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been developing a kernel driver for the Valve Steam Controller. This driver supports both USB cable and USB wireless adapters for the Steam Controller. This driver is being developed as a proper HID kernel driver so it should work with all existing Linux programs and doesn't require the use of the proprietary Steam client.
  • AT&T Puts Smart City IoT 'Edge' Computing On Direct Dial
  • Linux Foundation, AT&T Launch Akraino

Red Hat News and New Fedora 27 Live ISOs

Software: funny-manpages, Nginx, Cockpit and More

  • Have a Laugh With Funny Linux Man Pages
    There is a package unsurprisingly called funny-manpages and it adds some witty entries to the man pages.
  • HTTP/2 Server Push Directives Land in Nginx 1.13.9
    The open source Nginx 1.13.9 web server debuted today, providing support for a new HTTP/2 standard feature known as Server Push. The HTTP/2 web standard was completed three years ago in February 2015, with Nginx ahead of the curve in terms of HTTP/2 standard adoption. The NGINX Plus R7 release in September 2015 featured the first commercially supported enterprise-grade support provided by Nginx for HTTP/2.
  • Cockpit 162
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 162.
  • 6 Best Linux Music Players That Every User Must Try — (2018 Edition)
    Watching movies and playing music is one of the primary entertainment purposes served by our computers. So, when you move to a new operating system, it makes perfect sense if you look for useful media players. In the past, we’ve already told you about the best video players for Linux and, in this article, we’ll be telling you about the best music players for Linux-based operating systems. Let’s take a look at them:
  • CPod (formerly Cumulonimbus) – A Beautiful Podcast App
    Today, we introduce a somewhat new podcast application that is simple and yet delivers efficiently across all 3 desktop platforms. CPod, (formerly known as Cumulonimbus), is an electron-based podcast app player for audiobook and podcast lovers.
  • Apper 1.0.0 is out!
    Apper the package/apps manager based on PackageKit has got it’s 1.0.0 version on it’s 10th birthday!
  • VidCutter – Quickly Trim and Join Video Clips
    VidCutter is an open-source cross-platform video editor with which you can quickly trim and join video clips. It is Python and Qt5-based, uses FFmpeg for its encoding and decoding operations, and it supports all the popular video formats not excluding FLV, MP4, AVI, and MOV. VidCutter boasts a customizable User Interface that you can personalize using themes and a plethora of settings that you can tweak to make your video editing environment more appealing.
  • Weblate 2.19.1
  • Tusk Evernote Client Updated, Is Now Available as a Snap
    The Tusk Evernote client is now available as a Snap. We spotlighted the unofficial Evernote app last year, finding that it added to and improved on the standard Evernote web app in a number of ways.