Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Expect A 20% Rise In Your RAM Usage As Multi-process Feature Is Coming To Firefox

    Stepping up its game in the war of browsers, Mozilla is moving ahead to bring multi-process architecture in Firefox this April. While users are having reservations about the resultant RAM increase, a Mozilla engineer has performed benchmarking tests and claimed that users will notice a memory hike between 10% to 20%.

  • Our 2016 Fundraising Campaign

    The OpenBSD Foundation needs your help to achieve our fundraising goal of $250,000 for 2016.

    Reaching this goal will ensure the continued health of the projects we support, will enable us to help them do more, and will avoid the distraction of financial emergencies that could spell the end of the projects.

    2015 was a good year for the foundation financially, with funding coming almost equally from corporate and community donations. While the total was down significantly after 2014's blockbuster year, we again exceeded our goal.

    [...]

    If a penny was donated for every pf or OpenSSH installed with a mainstream operating system or phone in the last year we would be at our goal.

  • Write code that is easy to delete, not easy to extend.

    Every line of code written comes at a price: maintenance. To avoid paying for a lot of code, we build reusable software. The problem with code re-use is that it gets in the way of changing your mind later on.

    The more consumers of an API you have, the more code you must rewrite to introduce changes. Similarly, the more you rely on an third-party api, the more you suffer when it changes. Managing how the code fits together, or which parts depend on others, is a significant problem in large scale systems, and it gets harder as your project grows older.

Tech experts guide workshop on open source software

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

"The potential of open-source software is huge. For instance, a lot of people in our country cannot afford to purchase MS Office because they are very expensive. OSS can be a boon to people in software development and even in the field of education in general," said Lalit Kathpalia, director of Symbiosis Institute of Computer Science and Research (SICSR), which organised the seminar along with the Pune Linux Users Group.

Read more

FOSS in Education

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source is now ready to compete with Mathematica for use in the classroom

    When I think about what makes SageMath different, one of the most fundamental things is that it was created by people who use it every day. It was created by people doing research math, by people teaching math at universities, and by computer programmers and engineers using it for research. It was created by people who really understand computational problems because we live them. We understand the needs of math research, teaching courses, and managing an open source project that users can contribute to and customize to work for their own unique needs.

  • The scarcity of college graduates with FOSS experience

    In the education track at SCALE 14x in Pasadena, Gina Likins spoke about the surprisingly difficult task of getting information about open-source development practices into undergraduate college classrooms. That scarcity makes it hard to find new college graduates who have experience with open source. Although the conventional wisdom is that open source "is everywhere," the college computer-science (CS) or software-engineering (SE) classroom has proven to be a tough nut to crack—and may remain so for quite some time.

    Likins works on Red Hat's University Outreach team—a group that does not do recruiting, she emphasized. Rather, the team travels to campuses around the United States and engages with teachers, administrators, and students about open source in the classroom. The surprise is how little open source one finds, at least in CS and SE degrees. Employers expect graduates to be familiar with open-source projects and tools (e.g., using Git, bug trackers, and so forth), she said, and incoming students report expecting to find it in the curriculum, but it remains a rarity.

  • A Selection of Talks from FOSDEM 2016

    It's that time of the year where I go to FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers' European Meeting). The keynotes and the maintracks are very good, with good presentations and contents.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Split Emerges in Open Source MANO Efforts

    A broad attempt to create a single open source effort around managing and orchestrating NFV is now bifurcating into two separate groups, based on irreconcilable views of how to best standardize the MANO going forward.

  • LibreOffice 5.1 Looks Better and Plays Nicer with Other Office Apps
  • LibreOffice 5.1 shows first signs of a new user interface

    The Document Foundation today announced the release of LibreOffice (LO) 5.1. With this release, LO is moving toward a totally reorganized user interface.

    In earlier conversations with LibreOffice developers and The Document Foundation whenever I would ask about modernizing the UI they told me that their first priority was to clean up the code they inherited from OpenOffice. And once the codebase is clean they would start to focus in UI.

    That day has finally come.

  • Feedback on teaching open source usability

    I was pleased that ten students signed up for the elective. This may seem small, but it is a significant number for a campus of some 1,900 students and a small computer science department. The same number of students also signed up for other electives that semester, including a course on databases. I organized the class similarly to the usability projects I mentor for Outreachy. Over thirteen weeks, students learned about open source software and usability testing. Most weeks included two assignments: summarizing several assigned articles, and exercising their knowledge of that week's topic. Later in the semester, students moderated two in-person usability tests; the second was their final project.

    At the end of each semester, students responded to a course evaluation, called the Student Rating of Teaching. The evaluation is totally anonymous. I don't know which students made which comments, or indeed which students chose to respond to the survey.

  • Swift’s Benchmarking Suite is Now Open Source [Ed: to help Apple lock-in]

    Apple has open sourced Swift’s benchmarking suite, a key piece in tracking Swift performance and catching performance regressions when adding new features to the language.

    Swift’s benchmarking suite is a collection of Swift source files that implement test suites and benchmarking helper functions, plus a number of Python scripts that implement a test harness and facilities for metrics comparison.

  • Face it: There's no money in open source [Ed: says Asay from Adobe]
  • FSF: You did it! The fundraiser was a success -- are you ready for what's next?

    Once again, the free software community helped put the FSF in a strong position to tackle our list of free software initiatives in 2016, by giving $5 or $10,000, becoming a member for the first time, donating a little bit extra this year, and simply helping spread the word. We've said it before, but we'll say it again: we really can't do this work without your passion and generosity.

  • [denemo] Release 2.0.2 is out now.
  • Open-Source Textbooks Gain Support to Improve College Affordability

    Universities and state governments are supporting open-source textbooks as a way to make college more affordable.

    The open textbooks are produced with publicly available material. They are issued to students for free or a small fraction of the hundreds of dollars they typically spend annually on books.

  • OUR VIEW: Making college texts — if not college — affordable

    We’re all familiar with the high cost of a college education: estimated expenses for a year at the University of Connecticut, including on-campus housing, is, according to the school’s website, $25,802. So that’s a little over $100,000 for a four-year education. And that’s only the beginning.

    If a student takes four courses each semester and each requires one or more textbooks, the annual cost for books and supplies could be as much as $1,200, according to the College Board. Of course, if more than one book is required or if the student selects one of the high-cost majors, it could be far more. The standard textbook for Fundamentals of General Chemistry I at the University of Connecticut has a list price of $303.

  • Researcher illegally shares millions of science papers free online to spread knowledge

    A researcher in Russia has made more than 48 million journal articles - almost every single peer-reviewed paper every published - freely available online. And she's now refusing to shut the site down, despite a court injunction and a lawsuit from Elsevier, one of the world's biggest publishers.

    For those of you who aren't already using it, the site in question is Sci-Hub, and it's sort of like a Pirate Bay of the science world. It was established in 2011 by neuroscientist Alexandra Elbakyan, who was frustrated that she couldn't afford to access the articles needed for her research, and it's since gone viral, with hundreds of thousands of papers being downloaded daily. But at the end of last year, the site was ordered to be taken down by a New York district court - a ruling that Elbakyan has decided to fight, triggering a debate over who really owns science.

  • WHO Full Speed On Zika R&D, Two Candidate Vaccines Emerging; Funders, Journals Commit To Sharing Of Data
  • $99 CowTech Ciclop Open Source 3D Scanner Hits Kickstarter (video)

    So if you think CowTech Ciclop 3D scanner is something you could benefit from, visit the Kickstarter website now to make a pledge and help this awesome $99 open soruce 3D scanner become a reality.

  • Faircap Project: Open source 3D printed water filter aims to solve global crisis for just $1

    The Faircap Project is a collaborative, clean water initiative, whose aim is to create an affordable open source 3D printed water filtration device that could provide clean, safe, drinkable water to those in need. The startup has already created a working prototype, but is now calling on engineers, designers, microbiologists, or anyone interested in helping to pitch their own open source ideas and make the Faircap filter as low cost and accessible as possible.

  • Is the vinyl LP an open music format?

    This is my first article for a new column here on Opensource.com about music from an open point of view. Some things I won't be doing: I won't be concentrating solely on music released under an open license. I won't be writing (much) about making one's own music. I won't be writing (much) about music theory or professional matters, or probably really very much of anything of interest to professional musicians.

    I will write about music I encounter that interests me for one reason or another. I'll tell you about how to enjoy music in an open environment, like on a Linux-based laptop, desktop, or server. I'll share hardware I've purchased or tried out that works well, and some that doesn't, in an open environment. I promise to write about good places to buy music that are Linux-friendly (that is, those that don't require installing downloaders that only run on other operating systems). And I will point out some other websites, and occasionally print media, that increases my enjoyment of music.

Mozilla Thunderbird 45.0 to Finally Bring GTK3 Integration for Linux, Sort Of

Filed under
OSS

Earlier today, Mozilla has come out with the sixth point release of the stable 38.0 branch of its Thunderbird e-mail, news, and chat client, fixing a few minor issues reported by users since the 38.5.x series.

Read more

Pinterest open-sources its Teletraan tool for deploying code

Filed under
OSS

As promised last year when the company introduced it, Pinterest today announced that it has released its Teletraan tool for deploying source code on GitHub under an open source Apache license.

“Teletraan is designed to do one thing, deploy code,” Pinterest software engineer Baogang Song wrote in a blog post. “Not only does it support critical features such as zero downtime deploy, rollback, staging and continuous deploy, but it also has convenient features, such as displaying commit details, comparing different deploys, notifying deploy state changes through either email or chat room, displaying OpenTSDB metrics and more.”

Read more

Share your love for free software

Filed under
OSS

Yes, we love Free Software and this readily means that we love technology, people, social equanimity, and the various meanings one may take on for the word “freedom”. We care about it and we all want to bear witness of the growth and consolidation of new projects, and the progress of elder ones into full-fledged solutions driven by healthy and thriving communities. Free Software communities are inherently diverse and put together people with different motivations, expectations, and interests. Some are there to make friends and advance their technical and social skills, while others want to pursue the dream of an open world or even have Free Software as their daily paid job. In spite of such a diversity, one thing unite all of us in this Free Software odyssey: we love what we do.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • India Asks Tech Companies To Use Open Source Technologies For Connectivity

    A day after taking a tough stand on Facebook’s Free Basics and banning it from India, TRAI (Telecom Regulator Authority of India) has also given a cue to the tech giants like Facebook and Google over the use of open source software. TRAI has hinted to these companies that their connectivity framework would only be accepted in India if they followed an open source approach.

    [...]

    Ram Sewak Sharma, who is the current chairman of TRAI, has clearly put a stress on using open source technology over a company specific product in making the internet reach to the remote areas. In a recent summit hosted by the Internet and Mobile Association of India, he said,
    "I don’t like to comment on a specific product. But India has adopted an open source policy and open API [application program interface] policy. The whole objective is that there should not be a situation of a vendor lock-in."

  • Bluehost Develops Open Source Script To Update Two Million WordPress Sites

    The cloud-based solutions provider's custom script reduced WordPress-related technical issues by 18 percent.

  • What's New in February '16 in Open Source CMS

    By any measure, WordPress is the most popular content management system on the planet. But that distinction also makes it especially popular with hackers and attackers.

    Early this month Menifee, Calif.-based security company Sucuri reported a spike in WordPress infections, with a large number of sites getting injected with the same malicious scripts. Sucuri called it "a massive admedia/adverting iframe infection" characterized by the injection of encrypted code at the end of all legitimate .js files.

  • Dive into Apache Hadoop open source technology

    On this week’s NFV/SDN Reality Check, we look at some top news items from across the space as well as speak with Cloudera on CSPs adopting Apache Hadoop open source technology

  • Vote for Presentations - OpenStack Summit Austin 2016

    The first OpenStack Summit this year will take place in Austin (TX, US) from April 25-29, 2016. The "Call for Speakers" period ended some days ago and now the community voting for presentation started and will end 17th February, 11:59 PST (18th February 7:59 UTC / 08:59 CEST).

  • Liberty Eiffel wrapper for IUP toolkit

    Since a couple of months ago I’m working in a Liberty Eiffel wrapper to the IUP toolkit. IUP is a multi-platform toolkit for building graphical user interfaces. This is still under development, but I think the current state is enough to start playing with it. Here some screen shots:

Facebook-squishing Indian regulator's next move: Open source code

Filed under
OSS

Fresh from squashing Facebook's effort to grab the enormous India market, the sub-continent's regulator has another goal in mind: open source software.

Speaking at the India Digital Summit this week, chairman of the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI), Ram Sewak Sharma, told attendees: "No service can be hostage to a particular technology."

He then went on to explicitly support the broader adoption of open source software, arguing that it would help the booming digital economy in India from being locked into buying from a specific company and enable a broader and more equitable internet for all.

"Any technology that is deployed for connectivity must be interoperable and the open standards framework and the principles it entails are extremely important," he argued.

Read more

Education and Open Access

Filed under
OSS
  • UNICEF Seeks World-Changing Open Source Technologies

    United Nations to fund startups to develop open source tech to improve the lives of vulnerable children and civilians

  • UCLA just open-sourced a powerful new image-detection algorithm

    Image recognition has become increasingly critical in applications ranging from smartphones to driverless cars, and on Wednesday UCLA opened up to the public a new algorithm that promises big gains.

    The Phase Stretch Transform algorithm is a physics-inspired computational approach to processing images and information that can help computers "see" features of objects that aren't visible using standard imaging techniques. It could be used to detect an LED lamp's internal structure, for example -- something that would be obscured to conventional techniques by the brightness of its light. It can also distinguish distant stars that would normally be invisible in astronomical images, UCLA said.

  • Open-source textbooks gain in push for college affordability [Ed: same as below]
  • Open-Source Textbooks Gain in Push for College Affordability

    The standard textbook for Fundamentals of General Chemistry I at the University of Connecticut has a list price of $303. For students who use the version professor Edward Neth is preparing for the fall semester, the cost will be zero.

    An early adopter of open source textbooks, Neth said he turned to the new technology out of frustration with spiraling prices of commercial textbooks.

    "It's seeing the costs go up every semester and almost feeling powerless," Neth said.

  • Zika articles made open-source to accelerate research

    Nature, the Lancet and many other medical publishers and researchers have announced that all Zika-related scientific articles will be published freely in the wake of the recent outbreak.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Ubuntu Mate 17.10 is a pretty stable and rock solid distribution which has got most things right. There is nothing unlikable about the distro. However, I feel it could have been a lot better if they had allowed 4 windows to be snapped on each corners and done something about the opaque top panel. The software included are very much standard and even though some of their names have been changed we all know what’s under the hood. Overall Experience has been good. Having already tested Ubuntu with Gnome 3, I can say that Ubuntu Mate 17.10 feels a lot faster and quicker in terms of GUI response. Read more

Compact carrier turns Nvidia Jetson TX2 into an SBC

Aetina’s “ACE-N510” carrier for the Linux-powered Jetson TX1 and TX2 measures only 87 x 50mm, and offers HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, and optional -20 to 70°C. When Aetina recently unveiled its Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) ACE-N261 carrier for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 and earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1 COMs, it mentioned an upcoming ACE-N510 that was even smaller. Now we have the details on the little beastie, which like Connect Tech’s Sprocket Jetson carrier, has a compact 87 x 50mm footprint that matches the Jetson modules it stacks on. The ACE-N510 is designed for smart cameras, robots, drones, industrial inspection, mobile medical, and deep learning. Read more

OpenMandriva Is Dropping 32-Bit Support, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 Is the Last One

Powered by the Linux 4.13.12 kernel, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 is an enhancement to the previous OpenMandriva Lx 3 releases, adding major improvements to the boot process. The OS also uses the Mesa 17.2.3 graphics stack with S3TC support enabled, the X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server, and systemd 234 init system. On the user-visible side of changes, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 ships with the KDE Plasma 5.10.5 desktop environment and KDE Frameworks 5.39.0 software stack, along with the latest Firefox Quantum web browser compiled with LLVM/Clang 5.0.0 and Calamares 3.1.8 as default graphical installer. Read more

Kali Linux 2017.3 Ethical Hacking OS Brings InSpy, Sublist3r, and SMB3.0 Support

Coming two months after the previous release, Kali Linux 2017.3 is here with a new kernel, namely Linux 4.13.10, which adds better support for the latest hardware components, as well as all the security patches pushed upstream in the Debian Testing repositories, as well as various new tools. First off, the Linux 4.13.10 kernel adds SMB 3.0 support to CIFS by default, rises the EXT4 directories limit from 10 million entries to up to 2 billion, and enables TLS support. Second, Offensive Security updated several of the included tools for this release, such as The Social Engineering Toolkit, Reaver, Burp Suite, PixieWPS, and Cuckoo. Read more