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Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.0.18, Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.6

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Just a few moments ago, April 18, 2016, Oracle published a new update for its acclaimed VirtualBox open-source and multiplatform virtualization software, version 5.0.18.

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Why the Internet of Things needs open source

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It should come as no surprise to you that the Internet of Things already depends upon open source. Many IoT devices run one form of embedded Linux or another. In fact, without Linux many IoT devices simply wouldn't exist. What should come as a surprise to you is when companies that produce these IoT devices close up shop, they leave those devices out in the wild to die. Perfectly good hardware no longer capable of functioning...even when open source is at the heart of the device.

This needs to change.

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Study: Govt should nurture open source sector

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Governments that want to increase the use of open source software by public administrations should encourage the growth of an open source service sector, recommends Maha Shaikh, researcher at Warwick Business School, University of Warwick (UK). Public administrations should share their open source expert consultants.

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Gimp – A fast overview

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GIMP (short for GNU Image Manipulation Program) is an open source image editor that is available in the Fedora repositories. GIMP is primarily used for editing, cropping, retouching, resizing, and converting many different formats of raster images such as JPEGs and PNGs. This article will lead you through some of the basic tasks to get you started in GIMP, like how to open a new image, basic colour manipulation of an image and basic freehand drawing in GIMP.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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  • South Tyrol makes U-turn, drops LibreOffice project [Ed: "It doesn’t have to make sense. It’s government-policy," Pogson writes. See this bunch of articles about it.]

    The government of Italy's South Tyrol province will end its LibreOffice migration project, and instead intends to switch to a proprietary cloud-based office service. A decision was published on 12 April.

  • Free, high-quality education resources from the National Science Digital Library

    The use of open educational resources is growing. Open education involves making learning materials, data, and educational opportunities available to all without the restrictions of copyright and proprietary licensing models. According to U.S. Secretary of Education John King, "Openly licensed educational resources can increase equity by providing all students, regardless of zip code, access to high-quality learning materials that have the most up-to-date and relevant content."

  • Redox: a Rust-based microkernel

    Creating a new operating system from scratch is a daunting task—witness the slow progress of GNU Hurd, for example. But it would be hard to argue that the existing systems are the be-all and end-all of how we interact with computer hardware. At least some of the deficiencies in today's offerings can arguably be traced to the language used to implement them; C, for all its power, has some fairly serious flaws that lead to bugs and security holes of various sorts. So it is interesting to see a new entrant that uses the Rust language, which is focused on memory safety. The result is Redox, which is still far from ready for everyday use, but may provide an interesting counterpoint to Linux, the BSDs, OS X, Windows, and others.

  • Announcing Kestrel-4

    Based on the recent and wild success of the Kestrel-3 home-brew computer project, I am happy to announce my next project for the open computing masses. Say hello to the Kestrel-4.

  • An Open-Source Steam Controller Driver is in Development

    What properly holds me back from buying one is the fact I need to use Steam to use the controller, and the few games I do play aren’t available on Steam (e.g, SuperTuxKart, MAME, etc).

  • Open-source 3D printed WireBeings robot allows for voice controlled wifi functionality at a bargain

    When I was a child growing up in the 1980s robots were something found exclusively in the realm of science fiction. As time passed, the 1990s emerged and Honda’s Asimo started making appearances in tech-centric television programming on the Discovery Channel or TLC (this, during an era when those networks still focused on educational content).

OSS in the Back End

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Linux and FOSS Events

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  • Mixing Linux and ZFS, LinuxFest NorthWest and More…

    It’s LinuxFest NorthWest time! I’ve never been to LFNW, but I have a soft spot in my heart for it’s hometown of Bellingham, Washington. Back in the day — we’re talking the late 1960s and early 70s — Bellingham was home to a hippie underground newspaper, Northwest Passage, that was known in counterculture circles of the day across the continent. Alas, the Passage has been gone since ’86, but its spirit seems to live on in a high techy, Linuxy sort of way at LFNW. From what I’ve seen, LFNW seems to be the most community driven and for-the–people of the major festivals in the U.S.

  • Reflections on Starting a Local FOSS Group

    Last Wednesday was no less than the third time the local FOSS group in Aalborg met. Today I’m looking back at how it all started so I thought I would share some thoughts that may help others who would like to spread free and open source software in their local area.

  • BrickHack 2016

    Last month at the Rochester Institute of Technology, BrickHack 2016 came to a close. BrickHack is an annual hackathon organized by students at RIT. Close to 300 people attend every year. This year was BrickHack’s second event.

Expanding DBaaS workloads with OpenStack Trove and Manila

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One of the most commonly needed components of any enterprise application is a solid database, and the development community behind OpenStack is working hard to make sure working with databases in the open source cloud is an easy, reliable, and performant experience.

Amrith Kumar of Tesora, Christopher Merz of NetApp, and Rob Young of Red Hat are giving a talk at the OpenStack Summit in Austin, TX later this month entitled Expanding DBaaS Workloads with OpenStack Trove and Manila which explores the integration between multiple OpenStack projects, Trove and Manila, and developers from several companies to make databases a first-class citizen and enterprise-ready application for OpenStack.

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Keeping the Blockchain Open in the Shadow of Tech Giants

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You’ll find it parroted most in the open source community, particularly when Microsoft pulls stunts like their recent “partnering” with canonical to implement an Ubuntu-like Posix environment in Windows Ten. The phrase originates from the DOJ’s findings during the United States v. Microsoft Corp. antitrust case in 2003, as an internal standard for their technology development. Examples of Microsoft’s attempts at this methodology are pervasive in their offerings, including ActiveX and DirectX in the web and graphics software ecosystems, and recently, their involvement with the Linux community.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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  • Apache Storm 1.0 Packs a Speed Punch, is Set to Compete in the Big Data Space

    Are you familiar with Apache Storm? Not everyone is, but it, along with another Apache tool called Flink, is competing with tools like Apache Spark in the Big Data space. These tools focus on streaming data processing, which is emerging as a huge theme in the data analytics world.

  • Apache Wookie Heads to the Attic

    The last time I wrote about Apache Wookie was May 2012, on the occasion of the open-source project's 0.10.0 release.

  • Coreboot Ported To Run On Lenovo's ThinkPad T420
  • Broadwell-DE SoC / Xeon D Support Added To Coreboot
  • Open Source MANO Group Targets June for 'Release 0'

    OSM was formed under the auspices of European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) earlier this year, around the same time as the OPEN-Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O), a Linux Foundation group that is taking a different approach to unified open source-based orchestration efforts.

  • Chrome 50 Released for Windows, OS X, Linux; Retires Legacy Platform Support

    Google has released Chrome 50 for Windows, OS X, and Linux. The update brings several improvements, as well as bug and security fixes, apart from new features. An update for Android and Chrome OS is also expected to roll out soon.

  • Mozilla has asked us to "police" this forum.

    I was contacted by Mozilla with the request to "police" our forum, since we (Pale Moon devs) are in direct control of the things discussed and posted here.

    I'd like to clarify our position on this kind of thing to keep things from becoming unpleasant in both our relationship with you, the community, and our relationship with Mozilla:

    We do not censor your posts, and this will not change in the future -- this is an open forum.

  • ActorDB: an alternative view of a distributed database

    My Percona Live Data Performance Conference talk is called ActorDB: an alternative view of a distributed database. ActorDB is an open source database that was developed using a distributed model: it uses an SQL database that speaks the MySQL client/server protocol.

  • Inside Facebook's Open Source Machine [Ed: openwashing censorship and surveillance company (proprietary)]
  • Give to get: inside Facebook’s open source operation

    Facebook doesn’t sell software, but it’s arguably the largest open source software company in the world.

    In the last few years, the social network has accelerated its contributions to open source, providing not only code it uses in its own operations, such as its artificial intelligence software Torch, but also designs for servers and entire data centers. At the company’s F8 conference for developers and business partners this week, Facebook’s open source leaders announced continued progress on such projects as React Native, which helps developers use the same code on different operating systems.

  • OpenEMR 4.2.1 is released

    The OpenEMR community has released version 4.2.1. This new version is 2014 ONC Certified as a Modular EHR. OpenEMR 4.2.1 has numerous new features including 30 language translations and a patient flow board.

  • Open-source phytoremediation project tackles the Tiber River's pollution crisis

    Despite its historic significance, Rome’s Tiber River has become extremely polluted. In a bid to clean up the murky, trash-infested waters, deltastudio designed Albula, an interactive floating structure that combines elements from historic water mills with bio-based techniques like phytoremediation. Even better, the Albula is designed as an open-source and scalable project that can be replicated in a variety of contexts.

  • Follow My Vote Launches Crowdfunding Campaign For Verifiable Open-Source Blockchain Voting Software, Making Voting Honest And Convenient For All
  • Mycroft and Building a Future of Open Artificial Intelligence

    Last year a new project hit Kickstarter called Mycroft that promises to build an artificial intelligence assistant. The campaign set out to raise $99,000 and raised just shy of $128,000.

  • Easy installation of Arduino on Linux, MedPi open source health kit, and more news
  • "Open data and citizen participation key to modern government"

    Governments should listen to society in order to connect to and be part of an increasingly open world. Open data and citizen participation, rather than organisations and processes, are now the starting point for creating a government that is in close contact with society, knows what is going on, and defines problems and finds solutions in collaboration with society. So say three Dutch public servants in an article just published on Platform Overheid (Platform Government).

  • A four year, action-packed experience with Wikipedia

    My love for Wikimedia started while I was reading an article about the Bangladesh Liberation war on the English Wikipedia after my 10th board exam (like, an annual exam for 10th grade students in America). By mistake I clicked on a link that took me to an India Wikipedia article, and I started reading. Something was written in Odia on the lefthand side of the article, so I clicked on that, and reached a ଭାରତ/Bhārat article on the Odia Wikipedia. I was excited to find a Wikipedia article in my native language!

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Developer survey shows Linux as more popular than Windows

Every year since 2010, Stack Overflow conducts a developer survey where they ask the developer community about everything from their favorite technologies to their job preferences. The results of the eighth annual survey, held in January 2018, are out and not surprisingly, this year marks the largest number of respondents ever. Over 100,000 developers took the 30-minute survey revealing how they learn new technologies, which tools they use to get their work done, and what they look for while hunting some job. Read more

Ubuntu Preps to Remove Qt 4 Support from the Archives, Target Ubuntu 19.04

With Qt 5 being largely adopted by Qt application developers and other major projects, such as the KDE Plasma desktop environment, the Qt 4 technologies are becoming obsolete, so more and more GNU/Linux distributions plan its complete removal from the software repositories. Debian Project's Qt/KDE teams are already preparing to remove Qt 4 support from the repositories of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series mainly because it's getting harder and harder to maintain it now that it is no longer supported upstream, and may cause lots of problems system-wide. Read more

GNU/Linux-powered Ataribox

  • Mysterious ‘Ataribox’ console finally gets a name and pre-order window
    Atari’s new entry into the console market now has an official name: The Atari VCS. The device was originally teased as the “Ataribox” last year during the E3 gaming convention: A new Linux-based system providing all your favorite Atari classics along with games from independent developers. Visually, it’s a throwback to the Atari 2600 console, only with a sleeker, modern look and updated hardware. Atari calls it a “gaming and entertainment platform.”
  • GDC 2018 | The Ataribox is real, and it's more computer than gaming console
    Atari COO Michael Arzt told Tom’s Hardware that the machine will indeed run Linux (or, at least, a derivative of Linux) with its own Atari-themed UI. The device can be controlled through either a classically-styled joystick or a more modern gamepad. Users can also connect a keyboard and mouse through either USB or Bluetooth.
  • The Ataribox is here at GDC, but it's also kind of not (hands-on)
    In fact, Atari execs told us there's no longer a set price or a promised release date for the console -- because many of its key pieces, like its AMD processor and customized Linux operating system, are still coming together.