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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Using NoSQL Databases to Handle Fast Data

    NoSQL databases can help enterprises handle so-called Fast Data. MongoDB, DataStax and Redis are three NoSQL databases worth checking out.

  • Redis plants the seeds for an open source ecosystem
  • The All Too Common Challenges with Open Source, Custom Ecommerce Website Design

    Developers and site owners alike are often impressed by the immense freedom they have on open source, custom platforms such as Magento. They laud the flexibility it gives them to create a site that fits their exact needs and wishes. However, although the unstructured open source format does provide great opportunities for an experienced team, it oftentimes opens the door to many unforeseen issues and complications –– especially for the typical ecommerce retailer.

  • Drupal and Alexa: The Next Big Thing?

    DrupalCon is underway in New Orleans, Louisiana, and it kicked off with the always energetic keynote from Drupal project founder, Dries Buytaert. While these regular keynotes, known as "DriesNotes" in the Drupal Community, tend to focus on the state of the Drupal project, with updates on the development cycle and community interests, there is frequently also a particularly inspiring look toward the future. This year, Dries wowed the audience with a quick demo of a Drupal site communicating with an Amazon Echo to provide a personalized shopping experience via Echo's conversational interface. And perhaps most interesting was Buytaert's take on conversational interfaces as the next big shake-up for developers and content creators, much like mobile interfaces changed the way we approach web development in the recent past.

  • Rancher Raises $20M to Expand Its Container Management Efforts

    Container management platform vendor Rancher Labs raised new capital to help fund the company's engineering, sales and marketing efforts.
    Rancher Labs announced a $20 million Series B round of funding, bringing total financing to date to $30 million. The funding round was led by GRC SinoGreen and included the participation of Mayfield and Nexus Venture Partners

  • SROP mitigation committed

    In a recent email, Theo de Raadt explains the SROP mitigation technique, a recent team effort.

  • Denemo Version 2.0.8 is out.
  • "Open data basic resource of 21st century"

    The Irish Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, Brendan Howlin, has qualified open data as a basic resource of 21st century. Making government data publicly available for re-use brings economic, social and democratic benefits. That's why last year the country decided to set up a national data infrastructure. So told Eoin MacCuirc, Databank and Dissemination Manager at the Irish Central Statistics Office (CSO), his audience two months ago at the Open for Business v.2.0 conference in Dublin.

  • Networks need automation -- just ask the U.S. military

    Then there’s hacking: DISA logs 800 billion security events per day. Though many are innocuous, the Defense Department detects about 14 phishing attacks per day and rejects 85 percent of incoming email, Zabel said. Everyone from teen-age hackers to nation-states is targeting the network.

  • What Does DevOps 2.0 Look Like?

    In 2008, Patrick Debois laid the foundations for DevOps at an Agile conference in Toronto. He was trying to come up with a solution for the inherent conflicts between developers and system admins. Both disciplines seemed to be at odds: developers wanted to release software more frequently, but system admins wanted to ensure stability, performance, and scalability. While this conflict isn’t necessarily black and white, it highlighted the need for developers and system admins to no longer consider themselves as mutually exclusive roles, but rather as cross-functional partners.

Openwashing

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OSS

7 Open Source Big Data Analytics and Storage Tools

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OSS

Open source developers have built a burgeoning ecosystem of data analytics and storage solutions to address the data deluge over the past several years. Here's a look at several of the most popular open source tools for big data storage and analytics.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Google's Gale Powered By Qualcomm Added To Coreboot

    Topping off a lot of Google code landing in Coreboot in recent days for Chromebooks is support for another Google device and as part of that support for a Qualcomm SoC.

  • Chez Scheme Native Compiler now Open Source

    Chez Scheme is compiled using a nanopass compiler, which strives to reduce the number of transformations and optimizations that are done in a single pass to just one. This approach is claimed to make a compiler easier to understand and maintain, while also simplifying development, testing, and debugging. As an additional consequence of this, Chez Scheme should be particularly interesting for studying purposes.

  • Companies struggling to hire IT staff with open source skills

    Hiring talented developers can be a challenge given the current demand for OpenStack, CloudStack and other related cloud technologies skills. Some 87 per cent of the hiring managers find it difficult to find open source talent and have increased incentives to keep hold of the ones they have.

  • Cisco bets big on open source

    Open sources features heavily as the company boosts its software and services efforts

  • An in-depth guide to turning a product into an open source project

    One occasionally runs into a company trying to build an open source project out of an existing product. This is a nuanced problem. This is not a company that owns a project published under an open source license trying to also ship a product of the same name (e.g. Docker, MySQL), but the situation shares many of the same problems. Neither is this a company building products out of open source projects to which they contribute but don't control (e.g. Red Hat's RHEL). This is a company with an existing product revenue stream trying to create a project out of the product.

  • HPE’s IoT Platform Supports oneM2M, LoRa, SigFox

    HPE looks to make it easier for enterprises and service providers to connect and manage Internet of Things (IoT) devices with the debut of its IoT Platform 1.2. The platform is aligned with the oneM2M ETSI industry standard and will also support long-range, low-power networks such as LoRa and SigFox.

Big Data

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OSS

Nest/OpenThread

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Why the enterprise fell in love with open source

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OSS

Open source is becoming one of the most important sectors in IT. Not only does it underpin some of the most successful technology on the planet, it's increasingly bleeding into other areas of the enterprise, both in and out of the IT department.

GitHub's contribution to the rise of the open source revolution is in providing a platform for people to upload code for others to share and adapt freely. Its vice-president of product management, Kakul Srivastava, spoke to IT Pro to find out more about how open source is finding a home in the enterprise.

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CVE-2016-3710: QEMU: out-of-bounds memory access issue

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Red Hat
OSS

Quick Emulator (aka QEMU) is an open source systems emulator. It emulates various processors and their accompanying hardware peripherals like disc, serial ports, NIC et al. A serious vulnerability of out-of-bounds r/w access through the Video Graphics Array (VGA) emulator was discovered and reported by Mr Wei Xiao and Qinghao Tang of Marvel Team at 360.cn Inc. This vulnerability is formally known as Dark Portal. In this post we'll see how Dark Portal works and its mitigation.

VGA is a hardware component primarily responsible for drawing content on a display device. This content could be text or images at various resolutions. The VGA controller comes with its own processor (GPU) and its own RAM. Size of this RAM varies from device to device. The VGA emulator in QEMU comes with the default memory of 16 MB. The systems' CPU maps this memory, or parts of it, to supply graphical data to the GPU.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • I am your user. Why do you hate me?

    Leslie is a developer engagement strategist who works at Red Hat and sits on several key nonprofit boards. In addition to running her own company, Donna also sits on many boards and does much of the thankless work to put on excellent open source events in Australia. They each bring over a decade of experience with open source to their work, and their upcoming talk at OSCON titled, I am your user—why do you hate me?

  • DIY : Open Source Software for your very own IoT
  • Nominations for the 2016 New Zealand Open Source Awards open

    Nominations for the 2016 New Zealand Open Source Awards are now open.

  • Four Ways for Developers To Open Source Their Next Big Idea

    The open source movement is transforming technology in many respects, and its fundamental stance toward collaboration can be used to transform the inspiration process for developers as well.

  • Amazon open-sources its own deep learning software, DSSTNE

    Amazon has suddenly made a remarkable entrance into the world of open-source software for deep learning, a type of artificial intelligence. Yesterday the e-commerce company unceremoniously released a library called DSSTNE on GitHub under an open-source Apache license.

    Deep learning involves training artificial neural networks on lots of data and then getting them to make inferences about new data. Several technology companies are doing it — heck, it even got some air time recently in “Silicon Valley.” And there are already several other deep learning frameworks to choose from, including Google’s TensorFlow.

  • CoreOS Fest: Runway Provides a New Model Distributed Systems Design

    Ongaro explained that Runway is a new tool for distributed systems design. He noted that distributed systems are hard, they are hard to understand and hard to communicate about.

  • Watch Live Keynote From Mark Shuttleworth at Apache Big Data Today

    ApacheCon is the annual conference of The Apache Software Foundation. The Apache and open source community will gather May 11-13 to learn about and collaborate on the technologies and projects driving the future of open source, web technologies and cloud computing.

  • You Can Help Build the Future of Firefox with the New Test Pilot Program

    When building features for hundreds of millions of Firefox users worldwide, it’s important to get them right. To help figure out which features should ship and how they should work, we created the new Test Pilot program. Test Pilot is a way for you to try out experimental features and let us know what you think. You can turn them on and off at any time, and you’ll always know what information you’re sharing to help us understand how these features are used. Of course, you can also use Test Pilot to provide feedback and suggestions to the teams behind each new feature.

    As you’re experimenting with new features, you might experience some bugs or lose some of the polish from the general Firefox release, so Test Pilot allows you to easily enable or disable features at any time.

    Feedback and data from Test Pilot will help determine which features ultimately end up in a Firefox release for all to enjoy.

  • Intel Debuts CIAO for OpenStack Cloud Orchestration [VIDEO]

    The new Go based project is s called CIAO, Cloud Integrated Advanced Orchestrator and is a potential replacement or optional component for existing orchestration in OpenStack

  • Tech spending priorities to shift with DevOps transition

    IT organizations should get ready to cede some budgetary control to business units, as software -- and software developers -- become key agents of commerce.

  • On the Rise: Six Unsung Apache Big Data Projects

    Countless organizations around the world are now working with data sets so large and complex that traditional data processing applications can no longer drive optimized analytics and insights. That’s the problem that the new wave of Big Data applications aims to solve, and the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) has recently graduated a slew of interesting open source Big Data projects to Top-Level status. That means that they will get active development and strong community support.

  • An introduction to data processing with Cassandra and Spark

    So, what is Apache Cassandra? A distributed OLTP database built for high availability and linear scalability. When people ask what Cassandra is used for, think about the type of system you want close to the customer. This is ultimately the system that our users interact with. Applications that must always be available: product catalogs, IoT, medical systems, and mobile applications. In these categories downtime can mean loss of revenue or even more dire outcomes depending on your specific use case. Netflix was one of the earliest adopters of this project, which was open sourced in 2008, and their contributions, along with successes, put it on the radar of the masses.

  • Italian Military to Save Up to 29 Million Euro by Migrating to LibreOffice

    Following on last year's bold announcement that they will attempt to migrate from proprietary Microsoft Office products to an open-source alternative like LibreOffice, Italy's Ministry of Defense now expects to save up to 29 million Euro with this move.

  • How BSD was built, and how it lost the lead to Linux

    BSD has been eclipsed by the popularity of Linux over the years. But how did BSD get started? And why did Linux overtake and surpass it? Salon has a detailed article that charts the creation of BSD, and why it eventually lost out to Linux.

Openwashing

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OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust, Security, Things Gateway, Firefox and More

  • Rust pattern: Precise closure capture clauses
    This is the second in a series of posts about Rust compiler errors. Each one will talk about a particular error that I got recently and try to explain (a) why I am getting it and (b) how I fixed it. The purpose of this series of posts is partly to explain Rust, but partly just to gain data for myself. I may also write posts about errors I’m not getting – basically places where I anticipated an error, and used a pattern to avoid it. I hope that after writing enough of these posts, I or others will be able to synthesize some of these facts to make intermediate Rust material, or perhaps to improve the language itself.
  • This Week in Rust
  • Mozilla publishes recommendations on government vulnerability disclosure in Europe
    As we’ve argued on many occasions, effective government vulnerability disclosure (GVD) review processes can greatly enhance cybersecurity for governments, citizens, and companies, and help mitigate risk in an ever-broadening cyber threat landscape. In Europe, the EU is currently discussing a new legislative proposal to enhance cybersecurity across the bloc, the so-called ‘EU Cybersecurity Act’. In that context, we’ve just published our policy recommendations for lawmakers, in which we call on the EU to seize the opportunity to set a global policy norm for government vulnerability disclosure.
  • Testing Strategies for React and Redux
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
  • Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – April 20th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, micde, Jarrod Michell, Thomas Brooks.
  • Supporting Same-Site Cookies in Firefox 60
    Firefox 60 will introduce support for the same-site cookie attribute, which allows developers to gain more control over cookies. Since browsers will include cookies with every request to a website, most sites rely on this mechanism to determine whether users are logged in. Attackers can abuse the fact that cookies are automatically sent with every request to force a user to perform unwanted actions on the site where they are currently logged in. Such attacks, known as cross-site request forgeries (CSRF), allow attackers who control third-party code to perform fraudulent actions on the user’s behalf. Unfortunately current web architecture does not allow web applications to reliably distinguish between actions initiated by the user and those that are initiated by any of the third-party gadgets or scripts that they rely on.
  • Enterprise Policy Support in Firefox
    Last year, Mozilla ran a survey to find out top enterprise requirements for Firefox. Policy management (especially Windows Group Policy) was at the top of that list. For the past few months we’ve been working to build that support into Firefox in the form of a policy engine. The policy engine adds desktop configuration and customization features for enterprise users to Firefox. It works with any tool that wants to set policies including Windows Group Policy.
  • any.js
    Thanks to Ms2ger web-platform-tests is now even more awesome (not in the American sense). To avoid writing HTML boilerplate, web-platform-tests supports .window.js, .worker.js, and .any.js resources, for writing JavaScript that needs to run in a window, dedicated worker, or both at once. I very much recommend using these resource formats as they ease writing and reviewing tests and ensure APIs get tested across globals.
  • Alex Gibson: My fifth year working at Mozilla
    Today marks my fifth year working for Mozilla! This past year has been both fun and frantic, and overall was a really good year for both Mozilla and Firefox. Here’s a run down a few of the things I got to work on.

Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

  • Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28
    Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.
  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update
    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it.

Android Leftovers

Configuring local storage in Linux with Stratis

Configuring local storage is something desktop Linux users do very infrequently—maybe only once, during installation. Linux storage tech moves slowly, and many storage tools used 20 years ago are still used regularly today. But some things have improved since then. Why aren't people taking advantage of these new capabilities? This article is about Stratis, a new project that aims to bring storage advances to all Linux users, from the simple laptop single SSD to a hundred-disk array. Linux has the capabilities, but its lack of an easy-to-use solution has hindered widespread adoption. Stratis's goal is to make Linux's advanced storage features accessible. Read more