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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • ​Enterprise ready: OwnCloud 9 handles petabytes of data

    When you think of ownCloud, you think of a cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud you can run off a home server. OwnCloud 9, which will be released tomorrow, March 8, is far more than that.

  • Still reeling, SourceForge looks to the future

    The SourceForge and Slashdot communities have had a much bumpier ride than the opendesktop.org communities over the years. I won't go into detail about the ownership changes, but here's the tl;dr: The founders of Slashdot, Rob 'CmdrTaco' Malda and Jeff Bates, sold the site in 1999, about two years after its launch, to Andover.net. Then in 2000, Andover.net merged with VA Linux, which changed its name to SourceForge, Inc. in 2007, and became Geeknet, Inc. 2009.

  • Open source security: know your code [Ed: the FUD firm uses terms like “code hygiene”]

    The adoption of open source is a good thing overall, leading to faster time-to-market and lower development costs. But if we are relying on open source so widely (and we are), we have an obligation as security professionals to understand what we're deploying. Since 2014, more than 6,000 new vulnerabilities associated with open source have been disclosed. And the fact that the open source code you use today is free from vulnerabilities doesn't mean that it will remain that way in the future.

  • Google vendor security review tool goes open source

    Google's decided that the first-phase questionnaire it uses to vet vendors might be useful to the rest of the world.

    Until now an internal document, the Vendor Security Assessment Questionnaire (VSAQ) was created to help Mountain View cope with the huge number of vendor approaches it receives.

    The questionnaires help vendors describe their security posture to Google, so as to thin out the amount of stuff the Chocolate Factory has to let in the door for a presentation.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS
  • Hostel or hotel? Where to stay during the openSUSE Conference

    Nuremberg offers several places to stay during the openSUSE Conference, but don’t wait too long to book a hotel room or a hostel because there will be a race car event in Nuremberg June 24 – 26.

  • Open-Source Software: Riding the Innovation Wave

    Once considered only a hobby, open-source software development now takes center stage in the world of enterprise innovation. This represents a fundamental shift that is slowly but surely affecting every area of functionality.

  • KVM Forum
  • Embedded Linux Conference

    The Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) has been the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for the past 10 years for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products.

    After a decade of collaboration, the conference is extending its scope to include user-space developers, the people building applications on embedded Linux, and will be the preeminent space for product vendors and kernel and systems developers to collaborate with these influential technologists.

Hortonworks, Hadoop

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Server
OSS

Tiny Open Source Robot

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OSS

We watched the video introduction for this little open source robot, and while we’re not 100% sure we want tiny glowing eyes watching us while we sleep, it does seem to be a nice little platform for hacking. The robot is a side project of [Matthew], who’s studying for a degree in Information Science.

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96Boards SBC gains AOSP build from Linaro

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Android
OSS

Linaro released Android Open Source Project code for the octacore HiKey SBC. This is Linaro’s first AOSP build that will be maintained within the AOSP common tree.

ARM-backed Linaro, a collaborative engineering organization for developing open source ARM software, announced the new AOSP (Android Open Source Project) release for the 96Boards-compatible HiKey SBC at Linaro Connect in Bangkok. Linaro also announced an ARMv8 based Developer Cloud, a cloud-based native ARM development environment that can be used to design, develop, port, and test server, cloud, and IoT applications.

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Best Open Source Software for Windows 10

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Microsoft
OSS

I'll be the first to admit that I'm not a huge Windows fan. That said, I work with many folks who are. Which gets me thinking about open source applications that would be a best fit for their Windows 10 installations. In this article, I'll share my top picks for Windows 10 open source software.

Hey, just because someone is using Windows doesn't mean they can't still enjoy the benefits of great open source software! Right?

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Source code of European Data Portal now available

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OSS

The long awaited open source code of the European Data Portal version 1 is now available on GitLab. The accompanying documentation provides a comprehensive overview of all the different components of the portal, guidelines and installation manuals.

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Open source math software competes in the classroom

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OSS

To solve the problem, I created SageMathCloud, a web-based and collaborative way for people to use SageMath and other open source software solutions, like: LaTeX, Jupyter Notebooks, command line terminals, the full scientific Python stack, Java, Julia, Fortran and more. I based it's structure on two decades of experience I have using math software in the classroom and online at Harvard, UC San Diego, and University of Washington. It's commercial grade, hosted on Google's cloud, and backs up all user files every few minutes, recording a complete history of file editing. Large classes use it extensively today. Plus, there's no installation required. Just open your web browser and start using SageMathCloud.

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Interview with Bermon Painter: On design and shutting down BlendConf

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Interviews
OSS

Make it easy for designers to contribute to your open source project by putting the landing pages and documentation on your repository. Then, then link to that repository from your main site with messaging catered to designers that encourages contributions.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

Games: DRAG, Geneshift, Balloonatics and More

Tumbleweed Update

  • Tumbleweed Rolls Forward with New versions of Mesa, Squid, Xen
    This week provided a pretty healthy amount of package updates for openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed. There were three snapshots released since the last blog and some of the top packages highlighted this week are from Mesa, Squid, Xen and OpenSSH. The Mesa update from version 17.2.6 to 17.3.2 in snapshot 20180116 provided multiple fixes in the RADV Vulkan driver and improvements of the GLSL shader cache. The Linux Kernel provides some fixes for the security vulnerabilities of Meltdown in version 4.14.13 and added a prevent buffer overrun on memory hotplug during migration for KVM with s390. The snapshot had many more package updates like openssh 7.6p1, which tightened configuration access rights. A critical fix when updating Flatpak packages live was made with the gnome-software version 3.26.4 update. File systems package btrfsprogs 4.14.1 provided cleanups and some refactoring while wireshark 2.4.4 made some fixes for dissector crashes. Xen 4.10.0_10 added a few patches. Rounding out the snapshot, ModemManager 1.6.12 fixed connection state machine when built against libqmi and blacklisted a few devices to include some Pycom devices.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Rolls To Mesa 17.3, Linux 4.14.13
    OpenSUSE has continued rolling in the new year with several key package updates in January. Exciting us a lot is that openSUSE Tumbleweed has migrated from Mesa 17.2 to now Mesa 17.3. Mesa 17.3.2 is the version currently in openSUSE's rolling-release.

India Digital Open Summit 2018