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OSS

Conversations With My Dad About Open Source

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OSS

linux-mag.com: My father was one of those old school guys when it came to adopting computer technology. During the early years of the Internet, it took him a while to get his mind around the business model. By 1999, he called me one day and said “Know anything about this company Red Hat?

On the savannah, where the gnu roam...

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fsf.org/blogs: There are many services that will host your project's source code, mailing lists and bug trackers. While very few of these services charge for their services, most of them are built on proprietary software. Worse, some of them have started adding adverts for proprietary software in their mailing lists, or refusing projects with certain free software licenses.

Opendocument format

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trolltech.com/blogs: The Open Document Format (ODF) is an ISO standardized method of storing rich text and other office data. The ODF standard has grown in popularity over the last years quite a bit. Many governments around the world have passed laws stating that any sort of communication between the government and its people has to be done in ODF.

The Pitfalls of Open Source Litigation

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internetnews.com: Optimists say the best things in life are free; realists say yes, but anything that's free costs way too much. Nowhere is that more applicable than in open source software.

Growing the open-source community

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networkworld.com: The open-source community is no longer the sole province of technology geeks. The mood is shifting. As the mistress of ceremonies at OSCON (the Open Source Convention) commented: instead of open source trying to figure out its place in the enterprise, today the enterprise is seeking its place in open source. And that, among other trends, is causing changes in the community.

“Who’s The Next Open Source Idol?”

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businesswire.com (PR): GroundWork Open Source is sponsoring a competition amongst four popular open source mascots: “Tux” the Linux kernel penguin, “Beastie” the BSD daemon, Mozilla’s Firefox, and “The Gnu” GNU.

InfoWorld announces our 2008 Best of Open Source Awards

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weblog.infoworld: InfoWord recently released winners of the 2008 Bossie Awards. The awards are based on a review and analysis of the products in action by the InfoWorld Test Center.

Open the Windows; the Stench is Unbearable

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advice.cio.com: Heard the joke about the three engineers riding in a car that starts sputtering along the highway? The electrical engineer suggests they check the ignition. The mechanical engineer suggests they check the transmission. The computer engineer suggests they pull over, turn the car off and start it up again.

Why sharing matters more than marketshare to GNU/Linux

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freesoftwaremagazine.com: In a recent article, Ryan Cartwright argued that free software isn’t playing the “same game” as proprietary software is. He’s right—but that begs the question: what game is GNU/Linux playing?

Why Free Software has poor usability, and how to improve it

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mpt.net.nz: When I wrote the first version of this article six years ago, I called it “Why Free Software usability tends to suck”. Today’s best open source applications and operating systems are better than they were then. But

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Leftovers: Software

  • diction: The words you choose and why
  • style: Similar idea, different direction
  • SMS based Cosmos Browser for the developing countries
    Browsing the internet has different meaning to different people. While to some the web is a source of entertainment, to others it is a valuable and source of learning. Sadly enough, the internet is not widely available and easily affordable everywhere in the globe. Slow network speed is another problem. Developer Stefan Aleksic of ColdSauce tries to find a solution in an SMS (text) based browser for the third world countries which are yet to see the internet as we know it. He has named it the Cosmos Browser. If you ever used elinks on Linux, you know how efficient and low-bandwidth text only browsing can be. Of course, it is not meant for visiting a website for downloading wallpapers, but it is more than sufficient if you want to read some information from the web. Cosmos will work on text and will not need any data plan or WiFi.
  • Keyboard Modifiers State indicator For Ubuntu: Xkbmod Indicator

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Leftovers: Gaming