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OSS

Twitter engineer joins Mesosphere to push the open-source project he helped make

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OSS

Inside an academic lab, Ben Hindman created key parts of Apache Mesos, an open-source tool for efficiently running lots of applications in data centers. He found himself at Twitter for four years, putting the system in place. But now he is doing what he arguably was destined to do: working on the project for a living to make it a standard everywhere.

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CipherShed: A replacement for TrueCrypt

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OSS
Security

While the Open Crypt Audit Project, headed by cryptographer Matthew Green and Kenneth White, Principal Scientist at Social & Scientific Systems, has been considering whether to take over the development of TrueCrypt and is working on the second phase of the audit process (a thorough analysis of the code responsable for the actual encryption process), one of TrueCrypt's developers has expressed his disapproval of a project that would fork the software.

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Brocade Unveils Vyatta SDN Controller

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Linux
OSS

The new controller, which will launch in November, is based on the upcoming "Helium" release from OpenDaylight.

Brocade in November will launch a software-defined networking controller based on the OpenDaylight Foundation's upcoming "Helium" release and which will represent the vendor's latest move to grow its Vyatta platform.

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Open source is not dead

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Red Hat
Interviews
OSS
Security

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source.

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10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

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OSS

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure.

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Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

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OSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written.

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Small Console Menu Utilities

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Linux
OSS

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications.

The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects.

Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own.

This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill.

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Florida is back on the Map for Linux and Open Source conventions with FOSSETCON 2

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Linux
OSS

In summary the event was a good investment in time and booth expenses spent. We were able to distribute and promote Fedora in a very positive manner. More importantly getting more information on the various spins offered on our website pointed out to many individuals that there are more available on the Fedora Project website.. As the event ended on the 13th, I had had a conversation with the event coordinator with the plus side and the down side of what was going on.

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The future of analytics lies in open source technology

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OSS

There's the parquet system that they added to Hadoop. That was based on work that Google did on Dremel. Facebook has introduced things like PrestoDB. There's just a fascinating array, and the biggest thing about this is that these things are truly freely licensed from companies that have incredible depth of knowledge. They're really going to drive it now, and I think the open source stack is going to be pushed higher and higher. Even commercial vendors will incorporate it. So, it's definitely going to work itself into the enterprise.

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Oculus Makes Rift DK1 Open Source

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OSS

The first surprise of the Oculus Connect virtual reality (VR) developer conference in Hollywood, California has been revealed. Earlier today event host Oculus VR announced that the first development kit (DK1) of its Oculus Rift head-mounted mounted display (HMD) was now open source. This means that anyone can now download the company’s full list of workings on the device and use them how they see fit.

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More in Tux Machines

This Is How the New Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon Theme Looks Like

Linux Mint project leader and maintainer Clement Lefebvre dropped some exciting news today about what users should expect from the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" operating system. Read more

The May 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the May 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. In the May 2016 issue: * Netflix On PCLinuxOS: 18 Months Later * TubiTV: A Free Streaming Alternative * ms_meme's Nook: PCLinuxOS Is The Top * PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: jlane01 * GIMP Tutorial: Make A Folded Map * Game Zone: Zombasite * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner * Tip Top Tips: Update Your BIOS The Easy Way * PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions * And much more inside! This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Paul Arnote. Download the PDF (8.1 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-05.pdf Download the EPUB Version (4.9 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201605epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (9.0 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201605mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

A step ahead on Drupal 8 with easy accessibility design

The biggest mistake is bigger than Drupal: They don't consider it at all. This isn't a platform thing, it's a problem that is endemic to the web. Big companies get dragged into accessibility via legal threats. Small companies don't even think about it. Just the act of raising accessibility as an issue, and asking your team to keep it in mind throughout the design and development process is a big deal. You have to start somewhere. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 8
    In this episode: Bitcoin scandal. RMS wins an award. Savers and rich people can buy the DragonBox Prya (thanks Canseco!) and Devuan reaches beta. Plus loads of Finds, Neurons and a long-stewing Voice of the Masses.
  • Interop: SDN Growing to $12.5B, SD-WAN to $6B
    "Open source is not just at the bottom of the networking stack, it now goes from layer 2 all the way up to network and security services," Casemore said. "It's significant fact in the market landscape and vendors have to give it due consideration."
  • RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0
    A second Armadillo release 6.700.6 came out in the 6.700 series, and we uploaded RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0 to CRAN and Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now 220 packages using.
  • Vivaldi Browser's New Snapshot Adds Editable Mouse Gestures, Tab Improvements
    We've been informed by Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard about the availability of a new snapshot build of the proprietary Vivaldi web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows. Vivaldi Snapshot 1.2.470.11 is now live for those who want to get an early taste of what's coming in the next stable update of the cross-platform web browser, which it looks like it gets a lot of attention lately, especially from those who want to migrate from Chromium-based browsers like Google Chrome or Opera. And today's snapshot introduces editable mouse gestures.
  • GNOME's Nautilus File Manager: "Its Best Moment Since It Was Created"
    At various points in GNOME's history the Nautilus file manager has been less than maintained, but these days the situation is much brighter. GNOME developer Carlos Soriano has come out to write about how great the Nautilus situation is these days. Soriano wrote in a new blog post, "as far as I can see the development status of Nautilus it’s in its best moment since it was created, and part of that is thanks of the status of gtk+ development and the values and vision of GNOME as a project."
  • Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO Out Now with USB 3 Boot Support, KDE Plasma 5.6.2
    Neptune developer Leszek Lesner announced the release and general availability of a new Live ISO image for his Neptune Linux rolling operating system, version 4.5.1. The new Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO is now ready for download and includes all the updated packages and security patches released in the distribution's main software repositories since Neptune 4.5.
  • My free software activities, April 2016
  • m23 rock 16.2 brings support for Ubuntu 16.04 clients
    From this version on, m23 offers support for m23 clients using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus. A set of desktop environments is, of course, included for the new Ubuntu. Friends of the Univention Corporate Servers will be happy to hear that the m23 app is now available in the Univention App Center. As always, several small improvements have also been made to various parts of the software.
  • Unity 8 and Snaps Are the Future of the Ubuntu Desktop, After Ubuntu 16.10
    Today, May 5, 2016, is the last day of the Ubuntu Online Summit 2016, and we've just attended a very exciting session where the Ubuntu developers have discussed the future of the Ubuntu Desktop after Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak). You can watch the entire session below if you don't want to read the next paragraphs, but as usual, we'll try to detail and explain a few things for you so that you know now what to expect from future versions of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, on the desktop, of course.
  • Router hackers reach for the fork: LEDE splits from OpenWRT
    A split seems to have emerged in the Linux-router-OS community, with a breakaway group splitting from OpenWRT. OpenWRT is the chief open router firmware implementation, but it has run into headwinds of late. For example, downtime for the group earlier this year was traced back to the small organisation running a single, small, server without redundancy.
  • Samsung’s 360 degree camera will cost just about $350, oh and it runs Tizen !
    Samsung is one of those big guns from the consumer electronics market who has been betting huge on Virtual Reality. After partnering with Oculus for the Gear VR headset which has set its own benchmark for the best untethered VR solution one can buy, now that the headset has been in good shape, Samsung is working out ways to deliver content on it. Samsung have joined hands with multiple partners to provide VR experiences on its Milk VR platform and had also unveiled its own 360 degree camera at Unpacked 2016 event back in february- Gear 360 to let almost anyone to produce 360 degree content that can be viewed on the Gear VR.