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OSS

Where are the Women and Minority Open Source Programmers?

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OSS

Open source culture—in theory and largely in practice—is about as meritocratic as can be. Yet it's also nearly as dominated by white males as can be. Why is that? It's a question worth asking, especially in the wake of the Washington Post's observations a few days ago regarding Silicon Valley's "diversity problem."

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS

OpenWrt 15.05 Release Candidate 3 Uses Linux Kernel 3.18.18 LTS

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Linux
OSS

The OpenWrt project, through Steven Barth, announced recently that the third RC (Release Candidate) version of the anticipated OpenWrt 15.05 (Chaos Calmer) open-source third-party firmware for routers is available for download and testing.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • What's next for open source question answering technologies

    Grant Ingersoll is CTO at Lucidworks, provider of Fusion, but his claim to the open source community are his contributions to Apache Lucene, Solr, and Mahout. (He co-founded Apache Mahout in 2008 with the goal to build an environment for quickly creating scalable machine learning applications.) This year, Grant will be speaking at OSCON 2015 about building a next generation QA system with open source tools and about how to use Apache Solr for data science.

  • Bright Future & Strong Growth for Open Source Web Development According to Opace

    “Open source software is the way forward and has been since day one for us here at Opace" says David Bryan, Managing Director at Birmingham-based digital agency, Opace. The company, which specialises in web design and eCommerce development, proudly bases their entire business model and delivery around open source, believing it offers the best opportunities for both innovation and ground breaking developments. With 78% of companies now running some kind of open source software (according to the 2015 Future of Open Source survey), it’s looking like they could be onto something great.

  • Follow the Open Source Road

    This spring, I attended my first OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. As usual, there was a room reserved for media and analysts to hold meetings, but this one had only a curtain to separate two seating areas. I thought that it was strange, since it offered no privacy, and indeed, one company I met with was quite unhappy about it.

    A few weeks later, I recounted this story to my colleague, Caroline Chappell, who thought the setup was, in fact, perfectly appropriate for an open source conference. We talked about how a "curtain test" could be used to gauge a company's true seriousness about openness -- the theory being that there should be no secrets when it comes to open source, so who cares if there's only a curtain for separation?

  • Linux on supercomputers, Google's Eddystone, and more news
  • Google takes on iBeacon with open-source Eddystone
  • Google Proposes Open Source Beacons

    Google introduced an open specification for Bluetooth low energy (BLE) beacons on Tuesday in the hope that it can encourage developers, marketers, and hardware makers to adopt its technology alongside, or in lieu of, the iBeacon system offered by Apple.

  • Google Backs Open Source System In Cloud Battle with Amazon

    Google has become the biggest name yet to back the open source cloud system OpenStack. Specifically, Google will help integrate its own open source container management software Kubernetes.

    This may seem like in-the-enterprise-weeds news, but it represents another significant step as Google tries to make up ground against Amazon’s wildly popular AWS suite of cloud products.

  • Google joins the OpenStack Foundation to promote open source technologies

    GOOGLE HAS JOINED the OpenStack Foundation, becoming a corporate sponsor in a bid to promote open source and open cloud technologies.

Visualizing flux: Time travel, torque, and temporal maps

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Interviews
OSS

Open source is so important to our mission to make maps more accessible, and it's been essential for our stack development as we progressively learn from community requests and contributions. Our software is engineered for ease-of-use, and our GUI Editor interface is an effort to make mapping projects more accessible to non-GIS experts. Everyone should be able to map found, open, and personal data, easily. At the same time, we have almost all of the functionality accessibility in our editor, available via our open source libraries and APIs. We have Carto.js for making maps, Torque.js for time-series data mapping, Odyssey.js for building chapterized narratives on maps, Vecnik.js for vector rendering, as well as our Import, Map, and SQL APIs to facilitate easy and open map-building in code.

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7 big reasons to contribute to Opensource.com

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OSS

Opensource.com runs like other open source projects. The content collected and shared with you on this site is the result of the time, energy, and contributions from people all over the world. The writers you see published here, the community you see engaged with us on social media, and our readers keep Opensource.com going.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Open source router project administers Lithium

    The CloudRouter Project, a months-old effort to open source cloud routing, is announcing first shipment of OpenDaylight’s new “Lithium” SDN controller.

    OpenDaylight is a participant in the CloudRouter Project, and Lithium was released two weeks ago. It is OpenDaylight’s third SDN controller release and includes enhancements in security and automation, scalability, performance, OpenStack and group-based policy, including support for Cisco/Citrix/IBM/Microsoft/Sungard OpFlex policy protocol.

  • Continuous integration and delivery for documentation

    How does OpenStack merge over 900 documentation changes in less than three months? We treat docs like code and continuously publish reviewed content from multiple git repositories.

  • Mozilla Winter of Security is back!

    Last year, we introduced the Mozilla Winter of Security (MWoS) to invite students to work on security projects with members of Mozilla’s security teams. Ten projects were proposed, and dozens of teams applied. A winter later, MWoS 2014 gave birth to exciting new technologies such as the SeaSponge Threat Modeling platform, the Masche memory scanning Go library, a Linux Audit plugin written in Go for integration in Heka, and a TLS Observatory.

  • Russian big data technologies evolve with one eye on US open source

    Russian data technicians have, until recently, shunned full-scale use of US-based open-source big data technology; but with one eye on it

    Russian technology firms have largely focused on developing their own technologies for big data. And these are put to work across many sectors of the Russian economy.

  • LibreOffice 5.0 to Get Numerous DOCX Improvements

    The Document Foundation has released the third RC (Release Candidate) for the LibreOffice 5.0.0 branch, which is now available for download and testing.

  • Unlocking employee potential in the open organization
  • What matters most? Using metrics to build a better team
  • BUDDY opensource companion bot meets 100K crowdfunding goal in 1 day; now >200% funded

    BUDDY was purposely built on an open-source technology platform using popular development tools, such as OpenCV and Unity3D, to allow as many developers as possible to build applications for it. BUDDY’s industry standard platform includes the most popular programming languages and the Android mobile operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

  • Open-source oriented RISELab emerges at UC Berkeley to make apps smarter & more secure
    UC Berkeley on Monday launched a five-year research collaborative dubbed RISELab that will focus on enabling apps and machines that can interact with the environment around them securely and in real-time. The RISELab (Real-time Intelligence with Secure Execution) is backed by a slew of big name tech and financial firms: Amazon Web Services, Ant Financial, Capital One, Ericsson, GE Digital, Google, Huawei, Intel, IBM, Microsoft and VMWare.
  • Telecom organizations boosting support for open source
    Organizational support for open source initiatives is easing the integration of platforms into the telecom world. One key challenge for growing the support of open source into the telecommunications space is through various organizations that are looking to either bolster the use of open source or build platforms based on open source specifications. These efforts are seen as beneficial to operators and vendors looking to take advantage of open source platforms.
  • Google's Draco: Another Open Source Tool That Can Boost Virtual Reality Apps
    With 2017 ramping up, there is no doubt that cloud computing and Big Data analytics would probably come to mind if you had to consider the hot technology categories that will spread out this year. However, Google is on an absolute tear as it open sources a series of 3D graphics and virtual reality toolsets. Last week, we covered the arrival of Google's Tilt Brush apps and virtual reality toolsets. Now, Google has delivered a set of open source libraries that boost the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which can help deliver more detailed 3D apps. "Draco" is an open source compression library, and here are more details.
  • Unpicking the community leader
    Today is Community Manager Appreciation Day. Now, I have to admit, I don't usually partake in the day all that much. The skeptic in me thinks doing so could be a little self-indulgent and the optimist thinks that we should appreciate great community leaders every day, not merely one day a year. Regardless, in respect of the occasion, I want to delve a little into why I think this work is so important, particularly in the way it empowers people from all walks of life. In 2006 I joined Canonical as the Ubuntu Community Manager. A few months into my new role I got an email from a kid based in Africa. He shared with me that he loved Ubuntu and the traditional African philosophy of Ubuntu, which translated to "humanity towards others," and this made his interest in the nascent Linux operating system particularly meaningful.
  • Open Source Mahara Opens Moodle Further Into Social Learning
    Designers, managers and other professionals are fond of Open Source, digital portfolio solution Mahara. Even students are incorporating their progress on specific competency frameworks, to show learning evidence. Mahara and Moodle have a long and durable relationship spanning years, ―so much so that the internet has nicknamed the super couple as “Mahoodle“―. A recent post on Moodlerooms’ E-Learn Magazine documents the fruitful partnership as it adds value to New Zealander Catalyst IT’s offerings.
  • U.S. policy on open source software carries IP risks [Ed: Latest FUD from law firm against Free software as if proprietary software is risk-free licensing-wise?]

Openwashing and EEE

Q&A with Arpit Joshipura, Head of Networking for The Linux Foundation

Arpit Joshipura became the Linux Foundation’s new general manager for networking and orchestration in December 2016. He’s tasked with a pretty tall order. He needs to harmonize all the different Linux Foundation open source groups that are working on aspects of network virtualization. Joshipura may be the right person for the job as his 30 years of experience is broad — ranging from engineering, to management, to chief marketing officer (CMO) roles. Most recently he was VP of marketing with Prevoty, an application security company. Prior to that he served as VP of marketing at Dell after the company acquired Force10 Networks, where he had been CMO. Read more