Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish


Moving to open source databases can see savings of 90 per cent

Filed under

Enterprises could save up to 90 per cent on licensing costs by moving away from incumbent proprietary databases to an open source alternative, according to Frank Fanzilli (pictured), independent board director at PostgreSQL vendor EnterpriseDB and board director of the Linux Foundation.

Fanzilli, former global CIO at Credit Suisse First Boston, explained that banks have been adopting open source software, particularly Linux, since the 2008 crash in a bid to cut costs. Governments are also starting to trust open source to run mission-critical applications.

Read more

Also: Oracle's 'gun to the head' licensing: if I were them I'd do the same, says Linux Foundation board director

Studio Ghibli Chooses FOSS

Filed under

Apache PDFBox 2.0

Filed under

Dortmund levels playing field for open source

Filed under

The city of Dortmund (Germany) is levelling the playing field for open source software solutions. The city in January stated that it accepts electronic documents in the Open Document Format (ODF). Do-FOSS, a free and open source software advocacy group in the city, welcomed the “landmark decision”.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
  • New York considers tax breaks for developers of open-source software

    Senator Daniel Squadron (D)’s proposed NY senate bill S161, which is also sponsored by Senator Ruth Hassell-Thompson (D), will, if enabled, allow open-source software developers to claim back 20 percent of the expenses they incur for building and distributing free software. However, they’d only be able to claim back $200 a year under the proposed rules.

  • White House Seeks Feedback on GitHub for Government-Wide Open Source Software Policy

    The pilot program proposed in the draft policy would require “covered agencies to release at least 20 percent of their newly-developed custom code, in addition to the release of all custom code developed by Federal employees at covered agencies as part of their official duties.”

  • Seriously, the FCC might still ban your operating system

    A few weeks ago Julius Knapp of the FCC responded to the furor in the free, libre and open source software communities related to the agency's proposed rules on banning WiFi device modification. In his response, he sought to reassure the community that their proposals will not restrict open source firmware on devices.

  • How community building can help an organization's bottom line
  • 16 resources for measuring open source community ROI
  • Director of on challenges of unconscious bias

    Their conversation focused on a topic that is near and dear to the open source community: diversity in tech. Google's workplace is 70% male, so hiring more women and minorities interested in technology is a big issue for them. They know that they will create better products if they have a more diverse team. And, Jacquelline says we're seeing that companies founded by women are not getting the same results to support their businesses when pitching to venture capitalists. Men are 18% more likely to get funding with the same exact pitch as a woman.

  • Barclays Techstars start-up Seldon drives open source machine learning

    The current "AI summer" is being driven by gargantuan computational power being applied to larger and larger data sets. Housley said that around 2014 he saw a few different market forces at work, "an increasing commoditisation of machine learning and AI technology; popular big data technologies such as Apache Spark and Hadoop were bundling machine learning libraries as part of their systems."

    He pointed to more of a social trend with consumers expecting smarter apps and increasing automation of work force activities which is driving big data analytics. "Most companies are sitting on massive silos of data. Not just their structured data - their website activities which are very highly ordered - but also all the documents that are flowing through their systems."

  • Redox: A Rust-Written, Microkernel Open-Source OS

    Redox OS subscribes to a micro-kernel design but part of what makes it so interesting is that it's written in the Rust programming language. Most features are implemented in Rust for Redox OS and there's an optional original GUI, Newlib for C programs, drivers are run from user-space, and there's work underway in supporting the ZFS file-system. Common Unix commands are supported by Redox.

  • Day Two of FOSSASIA 2016

    I had to leave early to the venue for day two, as I had a welcome talk in the Python track. The morning started with the “Introduction to GSOC, and GCI” talk from Stephanie Taylor. The room was full with many ex-GSOC and GCI students, and mentors. The students of GCI last year completed more than 4k tasks, among them 1k+ was done by the students under FOSSASIA organization.

  • An OPNFV primer, using Ansible for CI, and more OpenStack news
  • Elsevier v. Sci-Hub on the Docket

    While searching for information on the next Elsevier Inc. et al. v. Sci-Hub et al. court date (just rescheduled from March 17 to April 27), I discovered that I — and apparently everyone else — have so far overlooked a big pile of public documents from the case. I’ve been checking PlainSite periodically, which hosts Elbakyan’s defiantly self-incriminating letter to Judge Robert W. Sweet and Sweet’s subsequent preliminary injunction against Sci-Hub and LibGen, but I should’ve noticed sooner that their collection is out of date and far from complete. So I ran a query on PACER, where the search tool for the Southern District of New York is so poorly designed and/or broken I couldn’t find what I was looking for. Fortunately, a site called PacerMonitor provides an alternate interface. $37.80 and many right-clicks later, I’d assembled all 122 PDFs released so far. You can download the full 42MB set here.

US invites public comments on open source policy

Filed under

The US’ Federal Government is asking for public comment on a draft Federal Source Code policy. The policy will require new software developed specifically for or by the Federal Government to be made available for sharing and re-use across Federal agencies. Part of this code is to be made available publicly.

Read more

GitHub's Atom 1.6 Hackable Text Editor Comes Bundled with NodeGit, New API

Filed under

This past weekend, we had the great surprise to see Atom 1.6, the next major version of GitHub's powerful, cross-platform and open-source hackable text editor exit the devel channel and enter the stable one.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
  • Europe is going to kill free software! Have you contacted your state's rep?

    These rules are bad and already hindering user freedom. The FCC has pulled a fast one and we need to fight back. This is a major security and privacy threat which will lead to even buggier and more insecure wireless hardware. A legal campaign to end this nonsense will require significantly more funding and criticism. Unfortunately the major players on fighting this are burning out. Christopher Waid, of ThinkPenguin, Dave Taht, of BufferBloat, Eric Schultz, Josh Gay of the FSF, and others just don't have the time or resources to keep fighting this. Don't let this be the end.

  • OpenStack Mitaka RC 1 Milestones Debut

    The first out of the gate is the Glance image project, which released its Mitaka RC1 milestone on March 16. Glance was quickly followed the same day by Heat, Neutron and Nova.

  • LTO'ing LibreOffice With GCC 6

    Upstream GCC developer Jan Hubička has written about his experience compiling LibreOffice with GCC6 -- while also making use of Link-Time Optimizations (LTO) -- and comparing various criteria against that of other GCC and LLVM/Clang compiler versions.

  • Dutch BSD Desktop Dev Beer Day

    There’s a handful of BSD-oriented, desktop-oriented, developers in the Netherlands that I know of. Koos. Raphael. Perhaps some remnants of KDE-NL, or a wandering GNOME developer. Or other desktop systems. Anyway, I’m launching the idea to have some kind of get-together around mid-april (when the weather is nice) somewhere central(-ish) like Zwolle or Amersfoort. The Dutch BSD Desktop Dev Beer Day, or (DBD)2. The plan would be to occupy a cafe somewhere and talk about BSD on the desktop, and in particular porting and keeping the desktop stack up-to-date on all fronts.

  • New open source load balancer, US source code policy draft published, and more news
  • Stack Overflow finds that you're probably a JavaScript programming Star Wars fan

    STACK OVERFLOW, the interactive Dear Deirdre for nerds, has released its 2016 user study. It interviewed 56,033 users in 173 countries, asking 45 questions that give some indication of the state of developers today.

  • The Sci-Hubbub

    Sci-Hub is a free, online repository of 48 million academic papers. It was launched by Kazakhstani graduate student Alexandra Elbakyan. Unlike most graduate students, Elbakyan is not pondering Foucauldian discourse and beer prices, but hiding out in Russia. According to a recent New York Times article, Elbakyan's struggles to access research papers inspired her to set up the site so that other students and researchers would have the same access to knowledge as researchers at well-funded universities. The repository is generated by downloading papers from publisher's paywalled websites using anonymous 'donated' subscription credentials.

Postgres and Firebird

Filed under
  • Oracle's letter to Russian IT companies

    It says that Oracle Corp. sent a special Postgres-related letter to at least several big Russian IT companies. In the letter Oracle is suggesting the ways to protect Oracle DBMS from migration to Postgres in government organizations and big Russian companies where many years Oracle was the default DBMS choice.

  • Firebird project repository was migrated to GitHub

    SVN repository is still accessible, but new contributions are expected to be provided as pull requests at GitHub.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.