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OSS

Why Use Docker On A Dedicated Server?

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Server
OSS

The reason Docker has so many people excited is that it allows for the creation of a strictly isolated environment that can contain everything that’s needed to develop, test, and deploy an application. The same container can run on a production server and the developer’s MacBook (with a lightweight virtual machine). Development environments can be distributed across multiple systems without anyone having to worry about having the right software versions. The containers can be pushed to dedicated servers, cloud servers, virtual servers, or any other instance of Linux.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Avnet and Red Hat to bring open source tech to Netherlands

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Red Hat
OSS

Avnet will expand its decade-long partnership with Red Hat to provide the Netherlands with a range of open source offerings.

The distie giant will offer Red Hat's Enterprise Linux and Enterprise Virtualisation solutions, alongside its JBoss Middleware offering.

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Librem 13 Free Software Laptop Nears Funding Goals, After Self-Funding

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OSS

In the few times I've looked at the Librem 13 crowd-funding campaign, it didn't look like it would make its crowd-funded goal of $250k... Even with the campaign being extended on Crowd Supply. However, in the past few days it shot up sharply towards its goal.

It turns out that it looks like the Librem 13 is being self-funded by Todd Weaver, the CEO of Purism, in order to meet their goal with the crowd-funded campaign ending on 17 September.

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Munich now a major contributor to open source

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OSS

The city of Munich is a major contributor to free and open source projects, sending bugfixes to upstream developers, making available software solutions and sharing best practices and technical information. In August, Munich IT staff members shared the city’s accomplishments with the community of Debian developers, one of the main free software distributions.

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MPV Open-Source MPlayer-Based Video Player Gets a Major Update with New Features

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OSS

The MPV movie player based on the MPlayer and mplayer2 open-source projects that supports a wide variety of video and audio file formats, as well as subtitle types and video codecs, has reached version 0.10.0.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

OSVR in the News

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source VR from Razer readies for commercial launch, gains more dev support

    Back in January Razer lifted the lid on its highly customizable "Hacker Dev Kit" VR headset and OSVR (Open-Source Virtual Reality) platform, both designed "to set an open standard for virtual reality input devices."

    Now the company has revealed that the consumer version of its headset, the HDK v1.3, will be available for pre-order on October 1, and that its OSVR content discovery platform has launched and can be accessed right away.

  • OSVR's open-source VR headset is slowly taking shape

    The Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) headset will get a significant upgrade soon. Gaming peripheral company Razer announced the OSVR program back in January, but the first prototype headset was an underwhelming affair with uncomfortable ergonomics and a so-so display. That wasn't really the point, though. Rather than a single company aiming to dominate the VR market, OSVR is a loose band of hardware and software companies hoping to do for virtual reality "what Android did for mobile."

  • OSVR releasing upgraded VR headset development kit in October
  • The Open Source Virtual Reality movement takes a big jump forward

    As the Virtual Reality gaming market grows, there are some growing efforts that are seeking to be less proprietary, and more inclusive about the process. Open Source Virtual Reality, or OSVR, is a movement that involves not just Razer, but over 230 companies that support the cause.

Five Ways Open Source Databases Are Best for Business

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OSS

Today 78% of organizations run part or all of their operations on open source software, a figure that has nearly doubled since 2010. And according to ranking site DB-Engines, six of the top 10 databases are open source, and the top eight non-relational technologies are all open source.

So why do so many organizations standardize on open source? Why do 66% of organizations look to open source before considering proprietary software alternatives? When it comes to databases, it turns out that the most important criteria are likely to be better addressed by an open source product.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics