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OSS

A new frontier for open source: Linux will power our robotic future

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Linux
OSS

"You know, with windows versus Linux, Windows got there first by a long shot. It was the entrenched party. So Linux is the scrappy upstart. In the case of robotics, open source got there first. The community grew up doing things the open source way. There was actually a period in the mid-2000s where Microsoft put a lot of effort into its Windows-based Robotics Developer Studio. It had really good features, but it's never taken off. So yeah, I think robotics are proving to be a different situation than what happened with personal computing."

Long live Linux. Long live ROS. Long live open source.

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An open source fix leads to a new career in IT

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OSS

Today at InterWorx, I write software for Linux for web hosting companies. I got my RHCSA last year, and I'm currently studying for the RHCE. I'd love to say that I got into open source and Linux for philosophical reasons, but to be honest it was just because it let me get stuff done. If it wasn't for Linux and other open source software, I never would have been able to fix that problem all those years ago. With that one opportunity (and a lot of work!), I was able to start a path to a whole new career.

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4 open source tools for Linux system monitoring

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OSS

This article discusses some of the interactive command line interface (CLI) tools that are provided with or which can be easily installed on Red Hat related distributions including Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Fedora, CentOS, and other derivative distributions. Although there are GUI tools available and they offer good information, the CLI tools provide all of the same information and they are always usable because many servers do not have a GUI interface but all Linux systems have a command line interface.

This article concentrates on the tools that I typically use. If I did not cover your favorite tool, please forgive me and let us all know what tools you use and why in the comments section.

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Gnumeric 1.12.27 Open Source Spreadsheet Editor Has ODF Roundtrip Fixes, More

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OSS

The Gnumeric development team had the pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of a new maintenance release in the Gnumeric 1.12 stable series.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Open Source DCIM Software Project Combats Spreadsheet-Based Data Center Management

    That free option does exist. openDCIM, an open source project born at one of the data centers supporting the US Department of Energy’s national labs. Its original creator, Scott Milliken, manages the Oak Ridge National Lab data center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  • OpsClarity Extends Monitoring to Open Source Suites

    OpsClarity's intelligent monitoring solution now provides monitoring for a growing and popular suite of open source data processing frameworks, including Apache Kafka, Apache Storm, Apache Spark as well as datastores such as Elasticsearch, Cassandra, MongoDB. The solution is intended to enable DevOps teams to gain visibility into how these technologies are dependent on each other and troubleshoot performance issues.

  • The future of the network is open source and programmability, says industry expert

    Network technology has changed considerably in the last 20 years, but most of the changes have been incremental – particularly as they relate the roles and responsibilities of network engineers and administrators.

  • HFOSS: Reviewing “What is Open Source?”, Steve Weber

    This blog post is part of an assignment for my Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development course at the Rochester Institute of Technology. For this assignment, we are tasked with reading Chapter 3 of Steve Weber’s “The Success of Open Source“. The summary of the reading is found below.

  • a lambda is not (necessarily) a closure

    But if you said "it's a closure" -- well you're right in general I guess, like on a semantic what-does-it-mean level, but as far as how Guile represents this thing at run-time, hoo boy are there a number of possibilities, and a closure is just one of them. This article dives into the possibilities, with the goal being to help you update your mental model of "how much do things cost".

    In Guile, a lambda expression can be one of the following things at run-time:

    Gone

    Inlined

    Contified

    Code pointer

    Closure

    Let's look into these one-by-one.

  • IBM Provides New Analytics Tools, and Big Datasets for Testing

    IBM has already made many big commitments to data analytics and the cloud. It is committing huge finanical resources to Apache Spark for example, and expanding its cloud portfolio. Now IBM has announced four new data services: Analytics Exchange, Compose Enterprise, Graph, and Predictive Analytics.

  • Free RightScale Tool Lets You Compare Public Clouds
  • Eclipse Che Open Source Cloud IDE Now Available in Beta

    Eclipse Che, an open source cloud IDE with RESTful workspaces and Docker-based machines, is now available in beta.

    Che offers a workspace that is composed of projects and its associated runtimes, making its state distributable, portable and versionable. The platform use VMs, containers, and Web services to bring repeatability, consistency, and performance to workspaces.

Apache Spark rises to become most active open source project in big data

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OSS

A healthy interest is not a surprise. In Apache Spark's relatively short life, there's been much discussion of its ascendancy. In September, Databricks, the company behind Spark, released results from a survey showing that Spark is the most active open source project in big data with more than 600 contributors within the past year, which is up from 315 in 2014. Plus, Spark is in use not just in the IT industry, but areas like finance, retail, advertising, education, health care, and more. That survey also showed that 51% of Spark users are using three or more Spark components.

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WandBoard.org spins Brillo-on-iMX6UL IoT hacker board

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Android
OSS

Wandboard.org launched a sandwich-style “HobbitBoard” that runs Brillo on an i.MX6 UltraLite, and offers Intel Edison, Wandboard, and MikroBus expansion.

The HobbitBoard, which is available for pre-order at $69 for March shipment, is the first hacker board to come out of Wandboard.org since the original i.MX6-based Wandboard debuted back in 2012. The Wandboard, which stepped up to a quad-core version in 2013, was one of the very first community-backed, open spec boards following the BeagleBoard. It came out about the same time as the original Raspberry Pi Model B.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Dispatches from FOSDEM, new survey data, and more OpenStack news
  • Open Source and .NET — Why It's Not Picking Up

    Open-source in .NET is not picking up. Despite good efforts from many good people and companies, it seems as if the Microsoft developers scene is far from embracing open-source. Why is this happening, and is there still hope for change?

    [...]

    But, this doesn't seem to be enough. OSS projects in .NET are not striving; there is not much innovation happening in this space; and OSS communities aren't being formed. It is all left as a dream we keep dreaming, but never actually getting to fulfil.

  • LLVM Clang 3.8 Compiler Optimization Benchmarks With -Ofast

    A few days ago I posted a number of LLVM Clang optimization level benchmarks using the latest code for the upcoming Clang 3.8 release. Those tests went from -O0 to -O3 -march=native, but many Phoronix readers wanted -Ofast so here are those results too.

    I didn't include -Ofast in the original tests since I don't know of many using this optimization level within a production capacity considering it has the potential of doing unsafe math as it disregards standards compliance in the name of performance. However, since several readers requested it and I still had this LLVM/Clang 3.8 build around in the same system configuration, I added in extra runs with -Ofast and -Ofast -march=native.

  • Texinfo 6.1 released

    We have released version 6.1 of Texinfo, the GNU documentation format.

  • A Simple Hangman Game Implemented In 3 Lines Of Python

    Today I’m sharing a clever implementation of Hangman in python by programmer Danver Braganza. Take a look at this 3-lines-long program and try to make it more compact.

  • GitHub is undergoing a full-blown overhaul as execs and employees depart — and we have the full inside story

    We've been hearing about a lot of drama going on at $2 billion startup GitHub, the hugely important and popular site used by millions of computer programmers where 10 or more executives have departed in recent months.

Git 2.7 Gets Its First Point Release, Adds over 20 Optimizations and Fixes

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OSS

The popular Git free, open-source and cross-platform distributed version control system was updated this past weekend to version 2.7.1, and it's now available for download from the usual channels.

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Why I fought for open source in the Air Force

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OSS

I wanted an open source solution and faced a fair amount of resistance from our lawyers, management, users, and proprietary vendors. It was a difficult struggle at times, and it wasn't until the DoD published their first official guidance on the use of open source software that we started to gain traction. Finally, in the middle of all of the drama, the DoD leadership issued a policy update explicitly stating that open source software was acceptable as long as there was support for it, and that the support could come in the form of government programmers, if necessary.

This memo was a game changer, but it took more than just a policy update to get momentum to shift toward open source.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: Belated GUADEC Report, "Is GNOME Just Lazy?"

  • Alberto Ruiz: GUADEC 2017: GNOME’s Renaissance
    This is a blog post I kept as a draft right after GUADEC to reflect on it and the GNOME project but failed to finish and publish until now. Forgive any outdated information though I think the post is mostly relevant still. I’m on my train back to London from Manchester, where I just spent 7 amazing days with my fellow GNOME community members. Props to the local team for an amazing organization, everything went smoothly and people seemed extremely pleased with the setup as far as I can tell and the venues seemed to have worked extremely well. I mostly want to reflect on a feeling that I have which is that GNOME seems to be experiencing a renaissance in the energy and focus of the community as well as the broader interest from other players.
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.5 | Is GNOME Just Lazy?
    GNOME is dropping Active Desktop, Ubuntu is holding back Nautilus and I have been writing a lot of scripts.

Red Hat Hires From Microsoft; Fedora 27 Release Party at Taipei

Devices: Advantech, Tizen, F-Droid

OSS Leftovers

  • Why no more new AND successful FOSS projects in the last ten years?
     

    If you ask me, the new, successful FOSS projects should be project that fix, replace, rewrite, whatever… the really unglamorous, low-level tools, libraries and so on that would make that happen. Yes, I know that this is really unlikely to happen under current business models and until IoT everywhere, new iPhones every year and the like are perceived as higher priorities, regardless of their environmental impacts and, very often, sheer lack of sense.

  • FOSS Backstage - CfP open
    It's almost ten years ago that I attended my first ApacheCon EU in Amsterdam. I wasn't entirely new to the topic of open source or free software. I attended several talks on Apache Lucene, Apache Solr, Hadoop, Tomcat, httpd (I still remember that the most impressive stories didn't necessarily come from the project members, but from downstream users. They were the ones authorized to talk publicly about what could be done with the project - and often became committers themselves down the road.
  • Liveblogging RIT’s FOSS projects class: initial questions for community spelunking
    Stephen Jacobs (SJ) and I are co-teaching “Project in FOSS Development” at RIT this semester, which basically means “hey students, want to get course credit for contributing to a FOSS project?” The class is centered around 5 project sprints of two weeks each. The first 3 weeks of class are preparing for the sprint periods; the week before spring break is a pause to reflect on how sprints are going. Otherwise, class efforts will be centered around executing project work… (aka “getting stuff done”).
  • Design’N’Buy launches All-In-One Designer on Magento Open Source 2.2
    Design’N’Buy announces the launch of their flagship product – the AIOD on Magento Open Source Version 2.2. With the launch of web to print solution on Magento Version 2.2 , Design’N’Buy becomes first event in web to print industry to offer complete eCommerce printing solution for printers on one of the widest and latest technology platform.
  • Singapore: Blockchain startup Bluzelle raises $19.5m through ICO
    Singapore-based decentralised database provider Bluzelle has announced that its initial coin offering (ICO) has raised $19.5 million in funding, according to a press statement.
  • Blockchain Startup Bluzelle Raises $19.5M USD In ICO
    Bluzelle’ advisor list includes the likes of Brian Fox, creator of GNU Bash, Alex Leverington, one of the original Core ethereum developers, Prashant Malik, co-creator of Apache Cassandra and Ryan Fugger, the original creator of the cryptocurrency Ripple.
  • The Document Liberation project announces five new or improved libraries
    The Document Liberation Project has announced five new or improved libraries to export EPUB3 and import AbiWord, MS Publisher, PageMaker and QuarkXPress files.
  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access
    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public. The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).
  • Is the Most Massive, Illegal Paywall in the World About to Come Down?
    A groundbreaking lawsuit is poised to decimate what is arguably the most unjust, destructive, and it now sounds like illegal paywall in the world, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records, PACER. PACER is the federal government court documents repository. Every federal court document, for every case, lives in PACER. It’s essentially a giant FTP document repository with a horrendous search system bolted on, not dissimilar to EDGAR. PACER was created in 1988 to enable access to court records electronically. Initially available only in courthouses the system was expanded to the web in 2001.
  • Codasip Announces Studio 7, Design and Productivity Tools for Rapid Generation of RISC-V Processors
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, today announced that it has launched the 7th generation of its Studio, the unique IP-design and customization software that allows for fast configuration and optimization of RISCV processors, customer-proprietary processor architectures, and their accompanying software development toolchains.
  • EE4J Code Begins the Journey to Open Source
    The EE4J project, which was created to manage the Eclipse Foundation’s stewardship of Java EE technologies following Oracle’s decision to open source them, is starting to gain traction. Soon after the project was created, EclipseLink and Yasson (the official reference implementation of Java JSON Binding, JSR-367) became the first two projects to be transferred under the EE4J umbrella. As reported in December, the announcement was made that seven more projects were being proposed.