Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Why "open source" is not "free software"

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Choosing to release a piece of software under the terms of a free software license is an important step. The myriad of licenses available can sometimes confuse and disorient the user, sometimes making this first step much harder than it should be. Let’s try and make things clearer.

FOSDEM 2009 - Surviving the crisis with open source

Filed under
OSS

heise-online.co.uk: The volunteer organisers of the "Free and Open Source Developers' European Meeting" (FOSDEM 2009) demonstrated the fine art of scalability with a very well organised event. 250 talks for 5000 developers arriving from all over Europe, were held with very few problems.

Open source speeds up molecular research

Filed under
OSS

tectonic.co.za: Simulating molecular motions provides researchers with information critical to designing vaccines and working on preventing diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Now, reports ScienceDaily, a new open source application developed at Stanford University is making it possible to do complex simulations on desktop computers - faster than ever before.

What makes the Linux Foundation, Eclipse, and Mozilla so good?

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: I came across news this afternoon about the LiMo Foundation endorsing the Open Mobile Terminal Platform specification, and I realized I didn't care. It's probably big news, but I couldn't get excited. Now contrast these organizations with the Linux Foundation, Eclipse, and Mozilla.

Bruce Perens: Combining GPL and Proprietary Software

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Linux is a natural for embedded systems. That's why it's popping up in more cell phones, often without the customer even realizing it's there. But cell phone manufacturers, and the broader sector of embedded systems, must cope with the problem of how to combine the GPL Linux kernel, and software that isn't Open Source. How does one do that legally?

Richard Stallman: Up close and impersonal

Filed under
OSS

brucebyfield.wordpress: When Richard Stallman spoke the other night at the Maritime Labour Centre in Vancouver, I wasn’t going to see what he is really like, or to hear his arguments. I went to see his public persona, and to observe how other people reacted to it.

Free software isn't freeware: why Linux and FOSS have a higher standard

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: Microsoft's recent survey proclaimed nearly half the population believe it is ok to use pirated software for personal use. This diminishes the argument by Linux advocates that you can use their operating system without any cost. Yet, you can't confuse free as in cost with free as in freedom. Here's what FOSS really means.

You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: "You get what you pay for" is a common FUDphrase used to discredit Linux and FOSS, because so much of it is available free of cost. Which scares the purveyors of overpriced crapware, who would rather walk barefoot through broken glass and burning dung than write software that customers actually feel happy paying for.

Canonical's Survey Results Give Insight to Server Market Far Beyond Ubuntu

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: After taking a closer look at the survey, I'd recommend it to anyone interested in current server technologies, or where the server market is headed -- even if Ubuntu Server isn't part of the equation.

Open Source Means Business

Filed under
OSS

forbes.com: Sizable companies have been built from commercializing open-source software. Some entrepreneurs have found ways to build their companies on a shoestring using open source software, and they have figured out how to make money off something generally considered free.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

2014: A Banner Year for Open Source

Open source was initially adopted for low cost and lack of vendor lock-in, but customers have found that it also results in better innovation and more flexibility. Now it is pervasive, and it is challenging proprietary incumbents across technology categories. It is not only mainstream, open source is truly leading innovation in areas like cloud, mobile, big data, the Internet of Things, and beyond. As we embark on a new year, I cannot help but reflect on the speed with which technology is changing. Rapidly delivering technology is about much more than just the technology – it is about people and culture. More than ever, this is why executives are looking at key technology companies – including Red Hat – as their partner instead of as a vendor. Read more

IsoHunt releases roll-your-own Pirate Bay

Open Source Meritocracy Is More Than a Joke

In January 2014, Github removed the rug in its office's waiting room in response to criticism of its slogan, "United Meritocracy of Github." Since then, the criticism of the idea of meritocracy has spread in free software circles. "Meritocracy is a joke," has become a slogan seen on T-shirts and constantly proclaimed, especially by feminists. Such commentary is true — so far as it goes, but it ignores the potential benefits of meritocracy as an ethos. Anyone who bothers to look can see that meritocracy is more of an ideal than a standard practice in free software. The idea that people should be valued for their contributions may seem to be a way to promote fairness, but the practice is frequently more complicated. Read more Also: Unmanagement and unleadership

Linux Kernel Developers Consider Live Kernel Patching Solution

kPatch and kGraph may soon enable live kernel updates on all Linux distributions, making it possible to apply security and other patches on the open source operating system without rebooting. Read more