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OSS

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Who cares about market share?

    And if that seems selfish, I only have so much time for evangelism. Besides, if the advantage of free software for developers is that they are free to pursue their own interests, I see no reason that ordinary users can't claim the same privilege. I may be irked by the inaccurate statements about free software, or wish Linux more popular, but neither really matters compared to my everyday experience on the desktop. The diversity that I enjoy exists precisely because free software development is bound by considerations other than the commercial.

  • Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 16.11

    In contrast to most parts of the framework, the fundamental low-level protocols, which define the interaction between parent and child components have remained unchanged since the very first Genode version. From this interplay, the entire architecture follows. That said, certain initial design choices were not perfect. They partially resulted from limitations of the kernels we used during Genode's early years and from our pre-occupation with a certain style of programming. Over the years, the drawbacks inherent in our original design became more and more clear and we drafted rough plans to overcome them. However, reworking the fundamental protocols of a system that already accommodates hundreds of component implementations cannot be taken light-handily. Because of this discomfort, we repeatedly deferred the topic - until now. With the rapidly growing workloads carried by Genode, we deliberately decided to address long-standing deficiencies rather than adding the features we originally planned according to the road map.

  • Genode OS Framework 16.11 Now Available

    Genode OS Framework 16.11 adds support for asynchronous parent-child interactions, improved virtual networking, an improved RPC mechanism, unification and tightening of session labels, new framework APIs, support for smart cards, time-based password generation support, VirtualBox-over-NOVA improvements, and a range of other work.

  • Free Linux Foundation Webinar on Hyperledger: Blockchain Technologies for Business
  • Kubernetes Founders Have Ambitious Plans for Heptio Startup

    Two founders of the Kubernetes project at Google, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, recently announced their new company, Heptio. The company has raised an $8.5M series A investment round led by Accel, with participation from Madrona Venture Group. Heptio will bring Kubernetes to enterprises in order to accelerate software development, increase infrastructure efficiency and reduce the complexity of managing software at scale.

    Beda became an entrepreneur-in-residence at Accel Partners in late 2015, and it looks like this startup will have solid funding and lots of experience to work with. The company's concept is that Kubernetes can significantly reduce infrastructure costs and simplify operations at many businesses, but it is too hard to get up and running with the platform.

  • Node.js Moves to a Stable, VM-Neutral Future

    On November 29, 2016 the Node.js Foundation announced a major effort to help further grow and stabilize node.js on different virtual machines (VMs). By enabling node.js to be VM-neutral, the hope is that it can be used by application developers on a wider variety of platforms and devices.

    The Node.js Foundation is a multi-stakeholder effort that was first launched by the Linux Foundation in June 2015 in an effort to help stabilize the fractured node.js community.

First open source RISC-V chips arrive in Arduino board

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OSS

SiFive’s Arduino ready “HiFive1” dev kit features its 320MHz FE310, the first MCU using the open RISC-V ISA. Also, Samsung is rumored to be using RISC-V.

In July, San Francisco-based startup SiFive unveiled the first SoCs based on the open source RISC-V platform: A Linux-ready octa-core Freedom U500 and a FreeRTOS-based Freedom E300. Now, the company has gone to Crowd Supply to sell an open source, Arduino compatible HiFive1 development board based on the FE300 that it claims is the fastest Arduino compatible in the world, 10 times faster even than Intel’s Arduino 101.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • 7 tech advent calendars for the holiday season

    Technical advent calendars work in a similar way: Each day a new treat is revealed; sometimes it's an article explaining a new tip or technique, whereas other times the treat is an exercise to help you hone your skills. Tech advent calendars, although secular, run at the same time in the holiday season. This means they'll be kicking off on December first, giving the opportunity to learn all month long.

  • #LinuXatUNI

    This last Saturday 26th was celebrated the #LinuXatUNI event at National University of Engineering. There were more than 250 people registered, but we have only 84 attended, though. I was surprised about this! It might be the upcoming final exams at universities in Lima or the early time on weekend.

  • Keynote: Breaking Barriers: Creatively and Courageously
  • Amazon Web Services says open-source MXNet will be the ‘foundation’ of future AI services [Ed: This is openwashing of a surveillance operation]
  • How Microsoft Plans To “Mix” Ubuntu Linux And Windows 10 In Creators Update [Ed: Remember: Embrace. Extend. Extinguish. The "Microsoft loves Linux" lullaby is trying to lull and mislead us. Forgetting a 30-year pattern of Microsoft abuses.]
  • SiFive Launches Open-Source RISC-V SoC
  • IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Mozilla and NodeSource Join Forces on Node.js API; Node.js Build System will Start Producing Nightly node-chakracore Builds

    Part of Node.js Foundation’s mission is growing Node.js everywhere. The Node.js platform is already available on a variety of VMs, like Samsung’s JerryScript, a lightweight JavaScript engine for the Internet of Things. While many steps are needed to allow Node.js to work in VM environments outside of V8, the work the Node.js API working group and ChakraCore are doing are important steps to offer greater choice.

  • Open source dependency management is a balancing act

    When we started development of the Open Chemistry project we looked quite seriously at requiring C++11, and I was dissuaded at the time by several in our community. We ended up using some small parts of C++11 that could be made optional and falling back to Boost implementations/empty macro definitions. At the time I think it was perhaps a little too aggressive, but if I could go back I would have told my former self to go for it. The project was new, had few existing users, and was mainly targeting the desktop. Add to that the fact that adoption often takes a few years and there is the cost of supporting older compilers.

    [...]

    Hopefully we can maintain a good middle ground that best serves our users, and be cognizant of the cost of being too conservative or too aggressive. Most developers are eager to use the latest features, and it can be extremely frustrating to know there is a better way that cannot be employed. I think there is a significant cost to being too conservative, but I have seen other projects that update and change too aggressively lose mind share.

  • Emergency Bulletin: Firefox 0 day in the wild. What to do.

    We’re publishing this as an emergency bulletin for our customers and the larger web community. A few hours ago a zero day vulnerability emerged in the Tor browser bundle and the Firefox web browser. Currently it exploits Windows systems with a high success rate and affects Firefox versions 41 to 50 and the current version of the Tor Browser Bundle which contains Firefox 45 ESR.

    If you use Firefox, we recommend you temporarily switch browsers to Chrome, Safari or a non-firefox based browser that is secure until the Firefox dev team can release an update. The vulnerability allows an attacker to execute code on your Windows workstation. The exploit is in the wild, meaning it’s now public and every hacker on the planet has access to it. There is no fix at the time of this writing.

  • [Older] E-Voting Machines Need Paper Audits to be Trustworthy

    Election security experts concerned about voting machines are calling for an audit of ballots in the three states where the presidential election was very close: Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. We agree. This is an important election safety measure and should happen in all elections, not just those that have a razor-thin margin.

    Voting machines, especially those that have digital components, are intrinsically susceptible to being hacked. The main protection against hacking is for voting machines to provide an auditable paper trail.

  • UK.gov was warned of smart meter debacle by Cabinet Office in 2012

    The government was warned of the risks surrounding its controversial smart meter programme four years ago, according to a leaked internal report seen by The Register, but appears to have largely ignored those concerns.

    A review of the programme from March 2012 highlights the vulnerability of smart meters to cyber-attacks, and flagged estimates that the scheme could leave the taxpayer out of pocket by £4.5bn rather than save consumers cash.

    Some 53 million smart meters are due to be installed in residences and small businesses by the end of 2020 at an estimated cost of £11bn.

    So far 3.5 million have been installed. The government has said it expects the scheme will save £17bn. However, a recent delayed report found that benefits to the consumer could be much smaller than originally thought.

GStreamer 1.10.2 Multimedia Framework Released to Patch Recent Security Flaws

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OSS

Today, November 29, 2016, the GStreamer development team released the second maintenance update to the stable GStreamer 1.10 series of the open-source and cross-platform pipeline-based multimedia framework used on almost all Linux-based systems.

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HP5: A CMS plugin for creating HTML5 interactive content

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Interviews
OSS

Before working fulltime on H5P, many of us on the Core Team were deeply involved with open source projects. Over the years we have been consulted for Drupal based projects, and we’ve always tried to contribute back to the Drupal community as much as we can. H5P is installed on over 7,000 websites. It is used by hundreds of universities, including Ivy League universities. It is being used by huge companies, including Fortune 50 companies, and other big organizations like parts of the UN.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Even secretive hedge funds can open source their software

    Obviously data-driven investment managers are not going to divulge the secret signals that form the basis of their alpha strategies. But when something is not part of your main business it can help to open source the code, which can then be improved.

    These days open sourcing software is a trend that even large hedge funds such as AHL and AQR in the US taking part in.

  • Guest View: How to play by the eight (unwritten) rules of open source

    When it comes to formal-but-not-formal rules, baseball is king. Don’t talk about a no-hitter in progress, don’t steal a base in a blowout and so on, all getting into the minutiae of the game. But baseball isn’t alone in the world of invisible manuals; the technology industry has their own set of these hidden guidelines. Open source in particular—the transparent world of collaborative code that has birthed such IT miracles as Linux and GNU—follows a strong set of unwritten rules that allow communities to coexist, projects to evolve, and innovation to flourish.

  • OGP Action Plan in Spain: Civil society asks for more openness

    Fifteen civil society representatives in Spain have sent a letter to the Spanish government requesting more transparency and communication during the creation process of the country’s third National Action Plan.

    Earlier this month, the OGP Steering Committee sent a letter to the Spanish government, saying it had failed to meet its commitments to the OGP. “At this moment, the government is preparing the third Action Plan of Spain and we are concerned about the delay in the elaboration, as well as the lack of communication and information about it,” they wrote.

  • Corruption: European governments are still failing [Ed: Microsoft too fails them]
  • Dec. 13: Sacramento State Alumni Chapter to Host Event on Open Source Governance

    Sacramento State University’s Hornets Policy and Politics Alumni (HPPA) Chapter is hosting its "What's Possible: Open-Source Governance" event Dec. 13 to showcase how data and technology can improve government services and facilitate “new kinds” of civic engagement.

MuckRock goes open source

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OSS
  • MuckRock goes open source

    Since MuckRock’s founding, one of our goals has been to help as many people as possible take advantage of their right to public records. Today, we’re pleased to announce that MuckRock is going open source so that others can join us in that mission in new ways.

  • FOIA Machine joins MuckRock to make government more open for everyone

    With fake news seemingly everywhere and government secrecy becoming the norm, public records are more important than ever. To help, I’m pleased to share that FOIA Machine is joining MuckRock. The two sites will continue to operate independently to offer easy, accessible tools to help reporters, researchers, and the general public file, track, and share their public records requests.

  • FOIA Machine is joining MuckRock

    MuckRock, the nonprofit dedicated to transparency and open government, announced Tuesday that it's adding FOIA Machine to its organization. MuckRock, which helps reporters file freedom of information requests and other services for a fee, will maintain a FOIA Machine site separately and keep it free.

4 OpenStack guides to help you build your open source cloud

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OSS

In a fast-moving project like OpenStack, it seems like there's more to learn with every day that passed. There are plenty of tools out there to help you keep up, including hands-on training courses, books, and of course the official documentation. And to add to the mix, every month, Opensource.com takes a look back at recent OpenStack tips, tricks, guides, and tutorials created by the open source community that might help you in your journey.

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Time is running out for NTP

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OSS

There are two types of open source projects: those with corporate sponsorship and those that fall under the “labor of love” category. Actually, there’s a third variety: projects that get some support but have to keep looking ahead for the next sponsor.

Some open source projects are so widely used that if anything goes wrong, everyone feels the ripple effects. OpenSSL is one such project; when the Heartbleed flaw was discovered in the open source cryptography library, organizations scrambled to identify and fix all their vulnerable networking devices and software. Network Time Protocol (NTP) arguably plays as critical a role in modern computing, if not more; the open source protocol is used to synchronize clocks on servers and devices to make sure they all have the same time. Yet, the fact remains that NTP is woefully underfunded and undersupported.

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