Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

How open source took over the world

Filed under
OSS

GOING WAY BACK, pretty much all software was effectively open source. That's because it was the preserve of a small number of scientists and engineers who shared and adapted each other's code (or punch cards) to suit their particular area of research. Later, when computing left the lab for the business, commercial powerhouses such as IBM, DEC and Hewlett-Packard sought to lock in their IP by making software proprietary and charging a hefty license fee for its use.

Read more

OSS Leftovers: Puppet, Google, Haiku, glibc, and Kotlin

Filed under
OSS

Don’t be scared to open-source your startup’s technology

Filed under
OSS

To open source or not to open source? If you’re in the software business, this is a question you’re going to face at one point or another. The sooner you tackle it, the better.

The open-source movement is no underground phenomenon; it’s a fully mature and highly effective method of building software systems. You’re likely running open-source software right now. Every time you use Google you’re using one of the largest and most successful open-source operating systems in the world – Linux. Today’s largest enterprises owe much of their success to the open-source movement — we’re all building on-top of, and borrowing from, each other’s work, and this has powered the era of exponential progress we’re living in.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Guest Post: Cornelius Kölbel on end to end encryption

    Your Data is at risk. And thus, is your personal life and your company’s values. By using your own cloud storage like ownCloud you can avoid hackers, trade espionage, and rogue governments getting your data. Your data is under your control.

    But depending on where your storage is located some risks still remain. The connection to your ownCloud installation in the hosted datacenter is TLS protected. All data are encrypted on their transport to the datacenter. But within the datacenter your data is plain text.

    You are using ownClouds integrated encryption? You even have the full disk encrypted using LUKS or similar methods? This is fine but only protects you from certain attacks like stealing the sole hard disk. But if the attacker gains access to the very location where the actual encryption takes place, the encryption is useless, since this location also contains the encryption key! Thus, if the attacker has access to the datacenter or – more likely – is a rogue or bribed employee of the datacenter the attacker can get physical access to your encryption key and finally to your data.

  • George Hotz wants to help everyone hack their cars

     

    A user pairs the Panda hardware with Chfr, a dashcam app previously developed by Comma.ai that lets car owners record and review their drives. If the Panda is paired with Chffr, users can record all the sensor data from their cars. If the car has sensors — Hotz recommends any 2005 or newer luxury car and other vehicles produced beginning in 2010 — then users will be able to see all kinds of data. Users can get simple information like the speed and more complex data like the RPM of the engine, how much gas is in the tank, what the suspension is doing, whether the anti-lock brakes are on, and even how hard the driver hit the brakes.

  • Library announces free programs

    Photo Editing 101.” Today we learn about the basics of editing digital photos, using the GNU Image Manipulation Program (a free, open-source program much like Photoshop). Students will learn how to open image files, crop and color correct photos and save them as specific formats.

  • NEW IN WEST SEATTLE: WS Linux User Group
  • MySQL infrastructure testing automation at GitHub

    Our MySQL infrastructure is a critical component to GitHub. MySQL serves GitHub.com, GitHub’s API, authentication and more. Every git request touches MySQL in some way. We are tasked with keeping the data available, and maintaining its integrity. Even while our MySQL clusters serve traffic, we need to be able to perform tasks such as heavy duty cleanups, ad-hoc updates, online schema migrations, cluster topology refactoring, pooling and load balancing and more. We have the infrastructure to automate away such operations; in this post we share a few examples of how we build trust in our infrastructure through continuous testing. It is essentially how we sleep well at night.

  • A Call to Arms: Supporting Matrix!

    TL;DR: if you like Matrix (and especially if you’re building stuff on it), please support us via Patreon or Liberapay to keep the core team able to work on it full-time, otherwise the project is going to be seriously impacted.  And if you’re a company who is invested in Matrix (e.g. itching for Dendrite), please get in touch ASAP if you’d like to sponsor core development work from the team.  And if you’re a philanthropic billionaire who believes in our ideals of decentralisation, encryption, and open communication as a basic human right – we’d love to hear from you too Angel

  • Touch Typing

    My favorite tool is GNU Typist. It’s a small command line tool which can help anyone learn touch typing in a few days. Remember that the package name is gtypist.

  • Best Product Entry: Open Source Internet of Dosimeter

    Has entered a cool project into the Best Product portion of this year’s Hackaday Prize. It’s called an Open Source IoT Dosimeter. It has a Geiger tube for detecting radiation levels along with Internet connectivity and a host of other goodies.

Open Community Conference and Open Source Bridge Conference

Filed under
OSS
  • Jono Bacon: Open Community Conference: Updates, CFP, Webinar, and Prizes

    A little while back I announced that I am starting a new conference called the Open Community Conference in conjunction with my friends at the Linux Foundation.

  • Speaking at Open Source Bridge’17

    Recently, I got a chance to speak at Open Source Bridge conference which was held in Portland, Oregon!

    I spoke about Outreachy and my open source work. OSB conference was much more than just a ‘conference’. More than content in the talks, it had meaning. I am referring to the amazing keynote session by Nicole Sanchez on Tech Reform. She explained wonderfully the need of the hour, i.e Diversity inclusion is not just ‘inclusion’. Focus should be on what comes after the inclusion, Growth.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Comma.ai launches an $88 universal car interface called Panda

    ...Hotz said he decided to open-source the plans, enabling anyone who wanted to build it for free.

  • From kaftans to Kubernetes - how open source took over the world

    Going way back, pretty much all software was effectively open source. That's because it was the preserve of a small number of scientists and engineers who shared and adapted each other's code (or punch cards) to suit their particular area of research. Later, when computing left the lab for the business, commercial powerhouses such as IBM, DEC and Hewlett-Packard sought to lock in their IP by make software proprietary and charging a hefty license fee for its use.

  • DEF CON Badgelife: The Puffy That Runs Linux

    DEF CON is canceled again this year, and this time that statement is at least partially true. There will be no special official badges this year. There is no challenge or mystery embedded in the official DC badge. This is the year that unofficial badges from villages and random attendees finally supersedes the official offering. This is badgelife, and for the next few weeks, we’re going to be taking a look at some of the unofficial badges of DEF CON.

    The idea for [dorkengine]’s Puffy badge began last year with the so-called Bender badges from AND!XOR. Chalk this up to a story that ends with, ‘but you had to have been there’, but the Bender badges were wildly popular, sold like hotcakes, and were an astonishing success of independent badge craft at DC. [dorkengine] decided to get in on the action and build his own badge for DC 25.

  • AT&T Invests Up to $200M in ONAP-Focused Venture Capital Fund [Ed: Shadow NSA develops some financial strings in development of network software]

    AT&T is putting big money behind its Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), today committing up to $200 million to a venture capital fund that will invest in technologies that run on ONAP.

  • AT&T invests $200M in VC fund dedicated to ONAP startups, technologies

    AT&T is committing $200 million to Coral, a venture capital fund focused on technologies that run on the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP).

  • AT&T Targets IoT Startups with New $200M Venture Fund
  • AT&T to Invest $200M in SDN, IoT-Focused Startups
  • Glibc Enables A Per-Thread Cache For Malloc - Big Performance Win

    Glibc has added a per-thread cache to malloc and enabled it by default.

  • GCC Picks Up Support For ARMv8-R

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) now has support for the ARMv8-R architecture.

  • Grow Produce at Home With This Open-Source Fish Tank

    The fish in the tank and the plants in the garden above them rely on one another to flourish. The fish produce waste, microorganisms in the water convert the waste to fertilizer, and the plants drink up the fertilizer, cleaning the tank in the process. “Think about it—fish and plants can harmoniously coexist in the same ecosystem,” the Aquapioneers website reads. “So why not put those fish to good use?”

  • GitHub now lets you automatically request reviews from code owners when you make a change

    GitHub has announced a new feature that makes it easier to identify which people need to review changes that have been made to code in a repository.

    Using code owners, you can define specific teams or individuals that are responsible for a piece of code so that when you make a pull request the relevant people are informed automatically.

‘Open Source Development at Google Is Both Very Diverse and Distributed’

Filed under
Google
Interviews
OSS

Open source development at Google is both very diverse and distributed. The larger projects that we release generally have dedicated teams developing and supporting the project, working with their external developer communities and providing internal support to other Googlers. Many of the smaller projects include just one or two engineers working on something experimental or just a fun, side project. While we do have a central Open Source Programs Office (the group I manage), it is relatively small compared to the size of the company. Instead, the actual development happens throughout the company, with hundreds of teams and thousands of engineers, tech writers, designers and product managers contributing to open source in some way.

Read more

Defending GPL, Bashing GPL

Filed under
GNU
OSS
BSD
Legal
  • Permissive and Copyleft Are Not Antonyms

    Using the term “permissive” as an antonym to “copyleft” – or “restrictive” as its synonym – are unhelpful framing. Describe license reciprocity instead.

    Some open source licenses implement a clever hack invented by Richard Stallman where, as a condition of the copyright license, anyone creating derived versions has to agree they will license the new version the same way as the original. In a play on words, this concept is called “copyleft” and many open source licenses implement this hack.

    In its strongest form, the “copyleft” idea can place a condition on the licensing of all the other code compiled together to make the eventual binary executable program. Complying with this requirement can prevent use of business models that deny software freedom to the end user; as a consequence, many commercial software developers avoid the strongest forms of copyleft licensing.

    There are less stringent forms of copyleft. Licenses like the MPL (Mozilla Public License) only require individual files that are modified to be licensed under the same license as the original and don’t extend that requirement to other files used to build the executable. The Eclipse Public License (EPL) has a copyleft provision that’s triggered by distribution of the source code. These scope-restricted variants are all described as “weak copyleft.”

    In discussing these licensing approaches with clients, I’ve often found that these terms “strong copyleft” and “weak copyleft” lead to misunderstandings. In particular, developers can incorrectly apply the compliance steps applicable to one “weak” license to code under another license, believing that all such licenses are the same. As a consequence, I prefer to use different terms.

  • Should the Fair License Replace the GPL?

    Read the full license, and if you find yourself thinking, “That sounds impossible to enforce,” you aren’t alone. To me, the Fair Source License looks like another one of the many attempts I’ve seen to come up with something that looks like a free or open source license, but really isn’t.

Events: Snappy Sprint, GopherCon, Akademy, and openSUSE.Asia

Filed under
OSS
  • Snappy Sprint - London June 2017

    I recently attended a Snappy Sprint in London, UK. As well as the Canonical people attending (including me) with experience in the whole Snappy stack (Snapcraft, the Snap store, snapd, snapd-glib) we had great representation from the Elementary, Fedora, GNOME, MATE and KDE communities. My goal was to help improve the Snap experience for desktop apps both on Ubuntu and other distributions.

  • Celebrate Kubernetes and CoreOS this July, and join us at GopherCon and other events

    This July, celebrate the CoreOS and Kubernetes birthdays with us and more. We hope to see you at GopherCon, and at the Los Angeles Kubernetes meetup.

  • Antonio Larrosa -- Dragons, Doom and Digital Music

    Antonio Larrosa is the current president of KDE España and he and I have been friends for quite some time now. It may seem logical, since we both live in Málaga, are passionate about Free Software in general, and KDE in particular. But in most other respects we are total opposites: Antonio is quiet, tactful, unassuming and precise. Enough said.

    But that is what is great about Antonio; that and the fact he is very patient when troubleshooting. I know this because he has often helped me out when I have unwittingly wrecked my system by being an idiot and installing what I shouldn't. When he quietly muses "¡Qué cosas!" (which roughly translates to "That's interesting") you know you've messed up good.

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 Tokyo: Call for proposals is open

    openSUSE.Asia Committee calls for proposals of talks for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 held at the University of Electro-Communications on October 21 and 22.

    Please refer to the following announcement for the detail of openSUSE.Asia Summit:

    https://news.opensuse.org/2017/06/30/opensuse-asia-summit-2017-tokyo-japan/

    The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Tokyo, please consider applying for the event.

FOSS: Big Data Trends, Baidu, Mozilla Research, and Open Source CMS

Filed under
OSS
  • Big Data Trends

    Open source applications like Apache Hadoop, Spark and others have come to dominate the big data space, and that trend looks likely to continue. One survey found that nearly 60 percent of enterprises expect to have Hadoop clusters running in production by the end of this year. And according to Forrester, Hadoop usage is increasing 32.9 percent per year.

    Experts say that in 2017, many enterprises will expand their use of Hadoop and NoSQL technologies, as well as looking for ways to speed up their big data processing. Many will be seeking technologies that allow them to access and respond to data in real time.

  • Baidu Just Released An Open Source Autonomous Driving Platform
  • What a lack of trust can do to a team

    Lincoln Loop is an open organization in many ways. We're distributed across 7 time zones. We have no central headquarters. All members of our core team can see all our financials (literally every penny earned or spent) and choose their own salaries. We have an open vacation policy and let people set their own work schedules.

  • New Research: Is an Ad-Supported Internet Feasible in Emerging Markets?

    Fresh research conducted by Caribou Digital and funded by Mozilla explores digital advertising models in the Global South — whether they can succeed, and what that means for users, businesses, and the health of the Internet

  • July Open Source CMS Forecast: Drupal, Jahia, Liferay & More

    The arrival of July marks the halfway mark of 2017, which makes now a good time to briefly recap the year so far for open source CMS.

    So far this year we have seen open source CMS conferences come and go, greeted major releases from WordPress, Joomla and Drupal, and followed the progress of the eagerly anticipated SilverStripe 4 — which is slated for release “later this year.”

    Looking towards the second half of 2017, here's what to expect from the open source world in July.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

More on Mozilla Voice Recognition and Firefox Woes

Funding for Dremio and Matrix.org

BSD: OpenBSD, Benchmarking LLVM/Clang, and AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM

  • Blog about my blog
     

    I want to try it again, and this time I decided to create a self-hosted blog. Something that runs on my own server and with httpd, the web server that I wrote for OpenBSD.  

    [...]

    i That's why I decided to write my articles, including this one, in Markdown and use another tool such as lowdown to generate the XML pages for sblg.

     
  • Benchmarking LLVM/Clang's New AMD Zen Scheduler Model
    Just prior to LLVM 5.0 being branched yesterday, the AMD Zen scheduler model finally landed in LLVM and has the potential of boosting the performance of generated binaries targeting AMD's Zen "znver1" architecture. Here are some benchmarks of LLVM Clang 4.0 compared to the latest LLVM Clang compiler code when testing with both generic x86-64 optimizations and then optimized builds for the first-generation Zen CPUs, tested on a Ryzen 7 processor.
  • AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM, Makes It For LLVM 5.0
    It was coming down to the wire for the new AMD Zen scheduler model in LLVM 5.0 but now it's managed to land just hours before the LLVM 5.0 branching. The new Zen "znver1" scheduler model for LLVM was published by AMD in patch form last week and now this morning it's been merged to mainline LLVM. Funny enough, thanks to an Intel developer with commit rights to LLVM due to the AMD contributor not having access.

OSS: VirtualBox, AMD EPYC Platform Letdown, Choosing FOSS, Open Source Blockchain Project, and RcppAPT 0.0.4

  • VirtualBox 5.1.24 Brings a Better Support for AMD Ryzen CPUs
    VirtualBox is a free and an open-source application for virtualization on x86 platforms. VirtualBox development team has announced a new maintenance release VirtualBox 5.1.24. The recent release of VirtualBox brought more support for AMD Ryzen processors to run certain guests such as Microsoft Windows XP. Emulating more SSE2 instructions. Fixing multiple issues with the graphical user interface for KDE Plasma, and black screen on reboot for multi-screen setup under certain conditions.
  • AMD EPYC Platform Security Processor Code Will Not Be Open Source
    AMD EPYC has been getting some bad word of mouth due to what Intel has been trying to portray but much has been cleared out in the official presentation. Many users that are worried about security have asked AMD to open source the AMD EPYC Platform security processor code. That will not be the case according to AMD. AMD EPYC Platform security processor is designed to keep the user safe from attacks because the OS can’t see what the PSP or IME is doing. Similarly, the user will also not know what the chips are doing. That is all great if the chip is keeping the user safe but it also means that if the defenses are breached then the user will not realize that as well.
  • Open Source: To Use Or Not To Use (And How To Choose)
    You'd like to use open source software, but you're not sure what criteria you should use when deciding whether to rely on it for a specific project or not. I have a long, complicated history with open source software.
  • Japanese Online Giant GMO Launches Open Source Blockchain Project
    Internet giant GMO Internet Inc. of Japan today announced the launch of the GMO Blockchain Open Source Software Project (GMO Blockchain OSS). The system will allow users to develop programs using blockchain as open source. In a first attempt by the company using this platform, the company has developed an open source medical record sharing system and launched it on July 6th, 2017.
  • RcppAPT 0.0.4