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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Cross-platform development will dominate open-source this year, GitHub says

    The company also found an increase interest in deep learning. “Across multiple industries, artificial intelligence is solving a host of complex and interesting problems. You’ve helped drive that interest by upping your contributions to and visits to projects like Keras-team/Keras and Mozilla/DeepSpeech. TensorFlow/TensorFlow had 2.2 times more visits in 2017 than in 2016,” the company wrote in a post.

  • Open source project trends for 2018

    Last year, GitHub brought 24 million people from almost 200 countries together to code better and build bigger. From frameworks to data visualizations across more than 25 million repositories, you were busy in 2017—and the activity is picking up even more this year. With 2018 well underway, we're using contributor, visitor, and star activity to identify some trends in open source projects for the year ahead.

  • How writing can change your career for the better, even if you don't identify as a writer

    ut I did not start writing voluntarily. The tl;dr: of it is that my colleagues at Linux New Media eventually talked me into launching our first blog on the Linux Pro Magazine site. And as it turns out, it was one of the best career decisions I've ever made. I would not be working on Opensource.com today had I not started writing about what other people in open source were doing all those years ago.

  • Why an involved user community makes for better software

    Imagine releasing a major new infrastructure service based on open source software only to discover that the product you deployed had evolved so quickly that the documentation for the version you released is no longer available. At Bloomberg, we experienced this problem firsthand in our deployment of OpenStack. In late 2016, we spent six months testing and rolling out Liberty on our OpenStack environment. By that time, Liberty was about a year old, or two versions behind the latest build.

    [...]

    There is a solid model for how this should happen. We recently joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, part of The Linux Foundation.

  • Mozilla Thunderbird: What Thunderbird Learned at FOSDEM

    Hello everyone! I’m writing this following a visit to Brussels this past weekend to the Free and Open Source Software conference called FOSDEM. As far as I know it is one of the largest, if not the largest FOSS conference in Europe. It proved to be a great opportunity to discuss Thunderbird with a wide range of contributors, users, and interested developers – and the feedback I received at the event was fantastic (and helpful)!

    First, some background, the Thunderbird team was stationed in the Mozilla booth, on the second floor of building K. We were next to the Apache Software Foundation and the Kopano Collaborative software booths (the Kopano folks gave us candy with “Mozilla” printed on it – very cool). We had hundreds of people stop by the booth and I got to ask a bunch of them about what they thought of Thunderbird. Below are some insights I gained from talking to the FOSDEM attendees.

  • Deutsche Bank Doubles Down on Open Source with Waltz Release

    This code, named Waltz, lets firms bring together information about its applications and which data it pulls from all across its technology footprint globally. It categorizes the applications by determining the country it serves, products it trades, legal entities it reports to and other queries so banks have a clearer picture of the applications it has and what data it ingests.

  • Coinbase Introduces Open Source Fund: A Little $ Help for Some Friends

    Coinbase has launched the Coinbase Open Source Fund from which we’ll be donating $2500 each month to open source projects. According to its blog, Coinbase also began “as a humble Rails project” and has relied  on open source software to build its systems and products.

  • Sundar — a new traditional orthography ornamental font for Malayalam

    ‘Sundar’ is designed by K.H. Hussain — known for his work on Rachana and Meera fonts which comes pre-installed with most Linux distributions; and Narayana Bhattathiri — known for his beautiful calligraphy and lettering in Malayalam script.

  • An open source approach

    A new project has been launched by the University of Sydney, ErasmusMC and the Drugs for Neglected Disease Initiative to help find compounds that could lead to the treatment of fungal mycetoma.

    Mycetoma Open Source (MycetOS) will look for new ways to treat the neglected tropical infectious disease, which causes devastating deformities by attacking the skin, deep muscle and bone.

    The current antifungal treatment is reportedly expensive, toxic and ineffective, with only a 25-35% cure rate.

GitHub: Here are the biggest open source project trends we'll see in 2018

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In the cross-platform and web development sector, Angular/angular-cli repositories saw the most growth at 2.2x more users in 2017 than in 2016, the post said. Other Angular projects, Facebook's React and Electron, were also popular.

Developers are also heading to the site to look at deep learning projects as artificial intelligence continues to grow. Two TensorFlow repositories grew—TensorFlow/models saw 5.5x more traffic and TensorFlow/TensorFlow saw 2.2x more traffic in 2017 than in 2016.

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Digital India can only grow via Open Source

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The Open Source Initiative is celebrating its 20th Anniversary in 2018 as the term was coined in a session held on February 3rd, 1998 in Palo Alto, California.

In the last 20 years, the initiative has come a long way. Acknowledging the importance of'open source initiative' which continues to play in our lives and to enable open discussion on the challenges that exist and to work out strategies to iron them out, Bharat Exhibition organised an 'Open Source Summit 2018' in New Delhi on February 08, 2018.

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OSS Events and More Leftovers

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OSS
  • Percona Announces Tutorial Schedule for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • FSFE Assembly at 34C3: Wir taten was

    In December 2017, the Chaos Communication Congress moved for the first time onto the Messegelände Leipzig. The FSFE came along and as in recent years, our assembly attracted a lot of visitors. Together with EDRi, for the first time we have been setting up a cluster called “Rights & Freedoms” with our own stage for multiple sessions. Although there have been some organisational issues, this Cluster was a big success and during three days, it has been visited by thousands of people.

    I am happy to see the FSFE assembly again growing every year and having the possibility to bring our message of Software Freedom to the people at the Chaos Communication Congress. The CCC is Germany’s biggest annual meetup of hackers and political activists and is “considered one of the largest events of this kind, alongside the DEF CON in Las Vegas” (wikipedia).

  • a2k18 Hackathon preview: Syncookies coming to PF

    One eagerly anticipated item is the arrival of TCP syncookies (read: another important tool in your anti-DDoS toolset) in PF. Henning Brauer (henning@) added the code in a series of commits on February 6th, 2018, with this one containing the explanation

  • design notes on inline caches in guile

    Next, there are the arithmetic operators: addition, multiplication, and so on. Scheme's arithmetic is indeed polymorphic; the addition operator + can add any number of complex numbers, with a distinction between exact and inexact values. On a representation level, Guile has fixnums (small exact integers, no heap allocation), bignums (arbitrary-precision heap-allocated exact integers), fractions (exact ratios between integers), flonums (heap-allocated double-precision floating point numbers), and compnums (inexact complex numbers, internally a pair of doubles). Also in Guile, arithmetic operators are a "primitive generics", meaning that they can be extended to operate on new types at runtime via GOOPS.

  • The State of OpenJDK In Early 2018

    Oracle's Mark Reinhold spoke at last weekend's FOSDEM conference about the state of OpenJDK for open-source Java.

    Reinhold's presentation covered the bumpy OpenJDK 9 release and then a look ahead to their next six-month release cadence for future OpenJDK releases. He sought to relieve some who feared more frequent breakage and about the handling of new features/functionality in Java and more. Long story short, Oracle hopes for a smooth transition.

  • LinkedIn open-sources Dynamometer for Hadoop performance testing at scale [Ed: Microsoft is openwashing its surveillance (spying on businesses)]
  • Open Source Services Market Worth 32.95 Billion USD by 2022

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • The cpu_features library

    "Write Once, Run Anywhere." That was the promise of Java back in the 1990s. You could write your Java code on one platform, and it would run on any CPU implementing a Java Virtual Machine.

    But for developers who need to squeeze every bit of performance out of their applications, that's not enough. Since the dawn of computing, performance-minded programmers have used insights about hardware to fine tune their code.

  • Google Rolls Out cpu_features Library

    Google's cpu_features library makes it easier for detecting modern CPU capabilities like FMA, SSE, and AVX extensions when writing hand-tuned code.

  • 3 steps to reduce a project's failure rate [Ed: "Open Decision Framework" the latest Red Hat openwashing sound bite]

    It's no secret that clear, concise, and measurable requirements lead to more successful projects. A study about large scale projects by McKinsey & Company in conjunction with the University of Oxford revealed that "on average, large IT projects run 45 percent over budget and 7 percent over time, while delivering 56 percent less value than predicted." The research also showed that some of the causes for this failure were "fuzzy business objectives, out-of-sync stakeholders, and excessive rework."

  • Symphony Now Available on OpenFin Through Open Source Contribution to Symphony Software Foundation

    OpenFin, the desktop operating system built specifically for the needs of capital markets, announced today that it has publicly contributed code to the Symphony Software Foundation that allows, for the first time, any OpenFin customer to deploy Symphony Chat on the OpenFin operating system. The integration, currently in beta testing, enables seamless deployment and interoperability of Symphony alongside the expanding ecosystem of applications already running on OpenFin.

  • 2 startups are joining forces — and together they could pose a threat to Bloomberg

    Symphony, a messaging service that has gained some traction among Wall Street firms, has been integrated into OpenFin, an operating system built for financial-services, the two companies announced Thursday. 

    OpenFin hosts more than a hundred applications on its platform, and the integration means Symphony will be "interoperable" with those apps, the same way social media apps on your phone are able to talk with one another.

    “By enabling Symphony to run on the OpenFin operating system, we are making it easy for our mutual customers to unify the Symphony desktop experience with their other OpenFin-based apps," Mazy Dar, chief executive of OpenFin, said of the news. 

  • Gleif and Swift debut open source BIC-to-LEI mapping

    The Global Legal Entity Identifier Foundation (GLEIF) has published the first monthly relationship file that matches a Business Identifier Code (BIC) assigned to an organization against its Legal Entity Identifier (LEI).
    With the launch of this open source file, GLEIF and SWIFT have pioneered a cooperation model that, for the first time, enables market participants to link and cross-reference these key entity identifiers free of charge. This will significantly streamline entity verification processes and reduce data management costs.

  • Integrating continuous testing for improved open source security

    To protect yourself, you need mechanisms to prevent vulnerable packages from being added, and to ensure you get alerted and can quickly respond to new vulnerability disclosures. This chapter will focus on the first concern, discussing how you can integrate SCA vulnerability testing into your process, and prevent the addition of new vulnerable libraries to your code. The next chapter will deal with responding to new issues.

    Preventing new security flaws is conceptually simple, and very aligned with your (hopefully) existing quality control. Because vulnerabilities are just security bugs, a good way to prevent them is to test for them as part of your automated test suite.

PostgreSQL 10.2 Officially Out

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Server
OSS
  • Release 10.2

    Release date: 2018-02-08

  • PostgreSQL 10.2 Released With A Ton Of Security & Bug Fixes

    PostgreSQL 10.2 is now available as the latest point release to PostgreSQL 10.

    While PostgreSQL 10.0 brought a ton of new features and improvements when released last October, these point releases are focused on just improving the stability and fixes for this popular database system.

OSI, Third Decade of Open Source, 20 Years and Counting

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  • Why I want you to run for the OSI Board

    In the world of tech, we fit across three generations of contributors to free and open source software–those who were involved in the early days of free software; those who found places in the community after open source had been established; and the group paultag humorously dubbed the GNU generation–none of us have lived in a world without the explicit concept of user freedom.

    Within my cadre of FOSS-loving millennials, several of us have fairly similar stories, both inside of our FOSS lives and out: we all had formative life experiences of financial hardship, and tech helped us emerge into comfortable, middle-class lifestyles. We’re all community-focused and have worked as community managers. We’ve been finalists for the same jobs.

    That is to say, while we have different opinions and different outlooks, we all come from fairly similar places.

  • FOSDEM: The Third Decade of Open Source

    This weekend I spoke at FOSDEM in Brussels to deliver the opening conference keynote. My subject was “The Third Decade of Open Source” and as OSI President I summed up the main events of the last 20 years, some of the key facts behind them and then offered five trends that will shape the next decade.

  • Open Source Software: 20 Years and Counting

    When the decision was made to follow the label open source, a rift opened up within the free software movement. Classical adherents of the traditional values – Stallman in particular – viewed the Open Source Initiative as pandering to corporate interests, concerned purely with the marketability of the idea, and less with the social and ethical values.

    The debate still rages on, in 2016 Richard Stallman posted on the GNU website that “open source misses the point of free software” and that “supporters of open source considered the term a marketing campaign for free software…while not raising issues of right and wrong that they might not like to hear.”

    Disagreements aside, the value of open source to the tech industry in the past twenty years is incredible. Fuelling a generation of thinkers and tinkerers and a whirlwind of technological advances, it will continue to grow and shape our digital future.

    In an increasingly digitized world, the core values of the movement are ones that we should consider as we move forward.

Rugged i.MX6 UL box PC ships with open Linux source

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MayQueen Technologies has launched a fanless “Panzer” embedded PC that runs an open source Linux stack on an NXP iMX6 UL SoC, and offers -40 to 85°C support plus LAN, WiFi, USB, VGA, serial, CAN, and mini-PCIe.

Taiwanese distributor MayQueen Technologies has gone into the manufacturing business. Its first product is a Panzer industrial box PC. The Panzer features an open source Linux distribution running on a 60 x 46mm HW6UL-Core computer-on-module equipped with NXP’s 540MHz, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) SoC. There’s a product page for the HW6UL-Core module, but at publication time, it was empty. MayQueen also resells the i.MX6-based Pistachio SBC from NutsBoard.org, including both the original dual-core “Lite” version and a quad-core version.

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It’s launch day for Sylabs: Promoting portable high-performance containers for Linux

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Linux
OSS

Today is launch day for Sylabs — a new company focused on promoting Singularity within the enterprise and high-performance computing (HPC) environments and on advancing the fields of artificial intelligence (AI), machine/deep learning, and advanced analytics.

And while it's launch day for Sylabs, it's not launch day for the technology it will be promoting. Singularity has already made great strides for HPC and has given Linux itself more prominence in HPC as it has moved more deeply into the areas of scientific and enterprise computing. With its roots at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), Singularity is already providing a platform for a lot of heavy-duty scientific research and is expected to move into many other areas, such as machine learning, and may even change the way some difficult analytical problems are approached.

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