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OSS

OSS and Sharing, Standards

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OSS
  • OpenDaylight sets focus on accelerating time to market for Nitrogen, Oxygen open source initiatives

    As OpenDaylight gears up for its ODL-Developer focused event to introduce ideas and planning activities during the Oxygen development cycle, a key focus of the group is to accelerate the time it takes to release new projects into the open source community.

    The organization has continued to move quickly on new projects like its latest release of Nitrogen and upcoming ones like Oxygen.

  • How CBC Radio Canada wants to create open-source SMPTE 2110 software

    Many of the people who journeyed to IBC to affirm their plans for moving to IP will have been at the EBU’s open source event to extend their ambitions once they had caught wind of CBC Radio Canada’s plan to create an open source solution for the integration of the SMPTE ST 2110 interface.

    [...]

    “We strongly believe in true open standards and interoperability between multiple vendors. In production, separate multicast streams for video and audio are a must. We also believe that the pace of innovation of Ethernet technologies is such that compression is not required for most of our real-time production requirements,” said Legrand. “Our first objective was to help TR03/ST2110 became the de facto standard by providing the market with an OSS implementation. We chose FFmpeg because it’s an open source media pipeline used in a large number of consumer and professional media products.”

  • Free Software Efforts (2017W40)

    In this week I have looked at censorship in Catalonia and had my “deleted” Facebook account hacked (which made HN front page). I’ve also been thinking about DRM on the web.

  • The EME Debacle: A Moodler’s Perspective. Open Source News Roundup

    Last September, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), representing “major organizations such as Google, Microsoft, Netflix, Mozilla, Apple, [and] Adobe,” published specifications for Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) and recommended its adoption as a modern web standard. According to the Consortium, EME will allow playback and streaming of encrypted media content. Among EME features, there are content protection mechanisms, encryption/decryption modules, the concept of “licensing servers,” and distribution packaging services for EME-compatible content. While EME serves many purposes, it clearly supports Digital Rights Management (DRM) practices that bind reproduction of media to a client or user with the proper key or license.

    [...]

    In Moodle, an active movement of openness in technology and educational resources seems to protect us from any negative consequences of this predicament, at least for the time being. Just like when commercial LMS started to appear after Moodle, competitive open source solutions continued to thrive and do to this day. Still, no purely economic argument for openness exists that is fully convincing. Until more satisfying evidence appears, it’s best to assume that the existence of technologies like Moodle relies on ideology and values –even at the risk of looking paranoid– rather than strictly financial sense, for open source’s own sake.

  • The most important Firefox command line options

    The Firefox web browser supports a number of command line options that it can be run with to customize startup of the web browser.

    You may have come upon some of them in the past, for instance the command -P "profile name" to start the browser with the specified profile, or -private to start a new private browsing session.

    The following guide lists important command line options for Firefox. It is not a complete list of all available options, as many are used only for specific purposes that have little to no value to users of the browser.

  • PostgreSQL says SCRAM to MD5 authentication

    release of PostgreSQL 10, the open source database's developers are farewelling the deprecated MD5 in their authentication mechanism.

    Released late last week, PostgreSQL 10 instead uses an SHA-256 implementation of the Salted Challenge-Response Authentication Mechanism (SCRAM-SHA-256, described in RFC7677).

    The database has also gained the ability to distribute workloads across multiple nodes.

  • IKEA plans full-range town-center showrooms, 'open-source' design

    IKEA plans to test “open-source” design and full-range town-center showrooms as part of the furniture retailer’s efforts to adapt to rapidly changing consumer shopping habits.

  • OpenDocument Format Plugfest and test site

    We will be checking how well ODF supported in different software packages. Anyone can participate on-line, because we have built a website to do this testing.

    In this blog, I will explain what this website does so you can participate. The first twenty people that participate on-line tomorrow will receive a 'thank you' postcard.

City of Rome is getting ready for open source

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

The city of Rome (Italy) is taking well-orchestrated steps to increase its use of free and open source software, aiming to reduce lock-in to IT vendors. A key change is an overhaul of the way IT solutions and support services are contracted; in all future contracts, Rome will require IT service providers to help the city switch to alternatives to proprietary software.

This means change is coming soon. Many of the current IT contracts will need to be renewed next year, and by 2020 all current contracts will have been renewed, says Cecilia Colasanti, who works for Rome’s city councillor for Digital Innovation.

[...]

In 2018, Rome will run a pilot to test the use of workstations running Linux. Some of the IT support staff already have much experience with Linux servers and workstations, which should help resolve possible issues with network drives, shared folders and peripherals such as printers.

Rome’s IT department is supporting the city council’s wish to get rid of IT vendor lock-in, says Ms Colasanti, “We are working together closely, for without their support, change won’t happen.”

Commencement of the switch to open source was announced by the city in early September. "Currently, about one-third of our IT spending is distributed among just six IT vendors, some of which have been operating within the administration for more than three decades", the announcement quotes Councillor Flavia Marzano as saying. "Our choice to implement free software intends to end the oligarchy in this industry.”

Rome’s city council decided to switch to open source in October 2016.

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Open source, Raspberry Pi based robot mimics a Martian rover

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The remote-controlled, four-wheel “Turtle Rover” runs on a RPi 3, and offers a gripper, HD camera, and up to four-hour rides within a 200-meter WiFi range.

A Polish startup called Kell Ideas that was founded by roboticists who created Martian rover prototypes at Wroclaw University of Technology, has won Indiegogo funding for a rover-like open source robot. The four-wheel Turtle Rover can be remotely controlled via WiFi, and runs Linux on a Raspberry Pi 3 equipped with a HAT board.

Read more

Three Steps to Gaining Influence in an Open Source Project as a New Enterprise Contributor

Filed under
Linux
OSS

When The Linux Foundation started OpenDaylight, our first networking project, nobody that I was working with had ever done open source before. Four years later there has been a significant shift in the entire networking industry. And we’re watching this transformation happen from one industry to the next.

In those four years, I’ve also witnessed many large organizations with significant engineering investments blunder their way into open source. For example, they might just fly in and drop 20,000 awesome lines of code into a project and then get upset that nobody actually picked it up.

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Is the rise of open source connected to a decline in selfishness?

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OSS

OSS: Cascadia Community Builder Award, ITA, Storage, Hyperledger

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OSS
  • Cascadia Community Builder Award: 2017 winner announced

    The Cascadia Community Builder Award recognizes a person who has made an outstanding contribution to the free software movement in the Cascadia region, and this year's winner is Lance Albertson. The award was presented in person on Saturday, October 7, at the Seattle GNU/Linux conference. Albertson is director for the Oregon State University Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) and has been involved with the Gentoo Linux project as a developer and package maintainer since 2003.

  • ITA trains MoE staff on using free and open source software

    The Information Technology Authority (ITA), in cooperation with  Daleel Petroleum, is conducting a training programme for Ministry of Education employees, on using free and open source software (FOSS) till October 22. 

    The training programme targets 200 employees in Dakhliyah and Dhahirah governorates and focuses on three main training curricula: Ubuntu for beginners, designed for teachers and supervisors and advanced Ubuntu for technicians in addition to GIMP and Inkscape software for teachers.

  • Open source technology promises to alter enterprise storage

    The most obvious example of this is the development of Linux, various distributions of which have been adopted as the cloud operating system of choice and the go-to platform for modern application developers.

  • Join us at Sibos in Toronto!

    We’re traveling to Toronto in a few weeks to attend Sibos 2017, Oct 16-19. Under the conference theme of ‘Building for the Future,’ we have a robust program agenda planned that is designed to help attendees learn about permissioned blockchains, distributed ledger technologies and smart contracts, plus the latest innovations coming out of Hyperledger.

Ethereum and Blockchain News

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OSS

OSS: Apache, Mozilla, Events, and 3D Printing

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OSS
  • Large-Scale Governance – 10 Apache Lessons

    Even if one of these applies, you still might be smarter to join an existing “umbrella” like Software Freedom Conservancy in the US or Public Software in the UK. But if you do end up devising your own organization, you won’t go far wrong my starting with the Apache Software Foundation’s principles.

  • Mozilla extends, and ends, Firefox support for Windows XP and Vista

    Mozilla has announced it will end support for its Firefox browser on Windows XP and Windows Vista.

    The organisation offers Firefox Extended Support Releases (ESRs) that keep getting bug fixes for 54 weeks, even though nine new versions of Firefox should come along during that time. Mozilla offers ESR releases so that organisations with standard desktop environments can pick a version of Firefox and run it for a year, without the need to update their gold images.

    Enterprise software vendors also like this arrangement: Oracle only certifies its wares for ESRs because keeping up with a six-weekly release cycle is too much effort.

  • New Sessions Announced for the Samsung Developer Conference #SDC2017
  • Who Won at OpenWorld? Oracle, or Amazon and Splunk?

    As this year's Oracle OpenWorld 2017 draws to a close, I'm convinced that the best seat in the house to watch this one wasn't anywhere near San Francisco's Moscone Convention Center, the event's venue, but sitting in front of a computer in your home or office.

  • How a university's 3D-printed prosthetics club provides devices for amputees

    Last fall, one of the co-founders of Duke University eNable published an article describing our club’s beginnings and visions for the future. In the spring of 2016, we started out as six engineering students with a passion for innovation and design, supported by a small stipend from the Innovation Co-Lab and a grant from OSPRI (Open Source Pedagogy, Research and Innovation), a project supported by Red Hat.

    Since then we have established ourselves as a presence on campus, grown into a large interdisciplinary team, and connected with multiple recipients—including a young boy in Milot, Haiti. The resources offered through Duke and the sponsorship we've received allow us to continuously transform our ideas into things we can share with open source enthusiasts, makers, and dreamers alike.

OSS/Openwashing: Amdocs, Tevora, Singapore and Cloud Foundry

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OSS
  • Amdocs launches open source-based software and services portfolio for carriers

    Amdocs has announced Amdocs Network Function Virtualization (NFV) powered by Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) – a portfolio featuring modular capabilities that accelerate service design, virtualization and operating capabilities on demand.

    As the communications and media industry moves from static appliance-based networks to software based, elastic networks, carriers will be increasingly capable of providing services and capacity on demand or based on predictive traffic patterns.

    Instead of building networks for high peak periods, carriers want to spin them up dynamically to provide better network services in the right locations at lower price points. Service providers using technologies developed in ONAP and its ecosystem of capabilities can provide enterprises the ability to design their own networks as part of a richer set of service features.

  • Tevora Releases Free, Open-Source Penetration Testing Tool, SecSmash

    SecSmash is available free of charge on GitHub. Its modular framework allows for integration with any available technology solutions.

  • Open source gaining momentum in Singapore

    If you live in Singapore and have started using the newly-minted parking.sg app developed by the government to pay for street parking at public car parks, you may have noticed something in fine print in one corner of the app’s menu that says “built with open source software”.

  • Open Source Health IT App Development Cuts Back Costs

    Cloud Foundry Applications Runtime is an open source application development platform for cloud-native application. The platform is used and modified constantly to help organizations quickly gain access to the latest development technology.

    The tool has been a part of the Cloud Foundry Foundation for three years. It was originally created at VMware in 2010 and then moved to Pivotal in 2013 before it was donated to Cloud Foundry.

Hologram Debuts Open Source Cellular Modem for IoT

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OSS

Hologram on Thursday launched Nova, the first open source modem for cellular connectivity.

Nova is a USB cellular modem purpose-built for Internet of Things development. Its Hologram software tools are compatible with most single board computers, such as Raspberry Pi.

The Nova modem is open source and unlocked, so its use is not limited to Hologram's SIMs. Though it targets the developer community, it has potential uses for everyone from makers to system architects. It sells for US$49.

Read more

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