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Women in Technology, FOSS Influencers, and Making Your First Open Source Contribution

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  • Raising More than Capital: Successful Women in Technology

    One of my employees chooses a word at the beginning of each year to guide her personal and professional development efforts. Last year the word she selected was “Rise.” She told me it inspired her to elevate not only her skills, but the quality of her relationships, her attitude toward life and her self-confidence. As a female entrepreneur and the CEO of a growing global software company, our conversation led me to reflect on how successful women in technology rise above our challenges.

  • 9 tech influencers you should know

    In 2017, I published a list of ten fantastic people who inspired me. In this post, I'd like to recognize some of the people who have influenced and helped me in my open source and DevOps journey during the past year. This list is 100% personal; there is no particular rhyme or reason to the order. There are also a lot of terrific people I have not included.

  • A quick and easy way to make your first open source contribution

    The best way to level up your programming skills is to code more. The second best way is to read others’ code. What better way to do these things than collaborating in open source projects?

    First Contributions is a project to help you get started with contributing to open source projects. Excited to start your open source journey? Follow the instructions in Readme of the First Contributions project on GitHub.

Events: "I love Free Software Day", Linux Journal at SCaLE 16x, LF's China SDN/NFV Conference

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  • #ilovefs Report 2018

    On Wednesday 14th of February, our community celebrated the annual "I love Free Software Day". A day to declare love to the communities most important to you as well as saying "Thank You" to the Free Software projects surrounding us every single day. The Free Software Foundation Europe also wants to thank everyone who cheered and contributed to make this day as special as it could be.

    We counted hundreds of Tweets, Toots and Posts both on Twitter and the Fediverse as well as tens of blog posts, photos and artworks all showing love to the countless of people out there contributing to Free Software every day, be it in the form of code, translations, documentation, community work, designing or managing. Thank you very much to all of you amazing people!

  • Looking for New Writers and Meet Us at SCaLE 16x
  • China SDN/NFV Conference

    China SDN/NFV Conference is the official annual gathering of the China SDN/NFV Industry Alliance. It is co-organized by China Institute of Communications (CIC) and China Communications Standards Association (CCSA). In addition, the Conference is further supported by China Mobile, China Telecom, China Unicom, and the China Academy of Information and Communications Technology, Ministry of Industry & Information Technology. This influential group represents the guiding light and driving force for accelerating the research and development, commercialization and enduser adoption of software defined networking and network function virtualization.

prove you are not an Evil corporate person

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Google is known to be deathly allergic to the AGPL license. Not only on servers; they don't even allow employees to use AGPL software on workstations. If you write free software, and you'd prefer that Google not use it, a good way to ensure that is to license it under the AGPL.

I normally try to respect the privacy of users of my software, and of personal conversations. But at this point, I feel that Google's behavior has mostly obviated those moral obligations. So...

Now seems like a good time to mention that I have been contacted by multiple people at Google about several of my AGPL licensed projects (git-annex and either keysafe or debug-me I can't remember which) trying to get me to switch them to the GPL, and had long conversations with them about it.

Google has some legal advice that the AGPL source provision triggers much more often than it's commonly understood to. I encouraged them to make that legal reasoning public, so the community could address/debunk it, but I don't think they have. I won't go into details about it here, other than it seemed pretty bonkers.

Mixing in some AGPL code with an otherwise GPL codebase also seems sufficient to trigger Google's allergy. In the case of git-annex, it's possible to build all releases (until next month's) with a flag that prevents linking with any AGPL code, which should mean the resulting binary is GPL licensed, but Google still didn't feel able to use it, since the git-annex source tree includes AGPL files.

I don't know if Google's allergy to the AGPL extends to software used for drone murder applications, but in any case I look forward to preventing Google from using more of my software in the future.

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Open source HummingBoard and CuBox rev’d with new i.MX8M module

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SolidRun unveiled a 47 x 30mm “i.MX8 SOM” module that runs Linux or Android on an NXP i.MX8M, and is available as part of a dual-GbE HummingBoard Pulse SBC and 50mm CuBox Pulse mini-PC.

SolidRun has opened pre-orders for an i.MX8 SOM compute module with industrial temperature support, as well a new commercial temperature HummingBoard Pulse SBC and CuBox Pulse mini-PC driven by it. The products update the company’s similarly open-spec, but i.MX6-based, MicroSOM modules, which fueled several earlier, sandwich-style HummingBoard SBCs and CuBox mini-PCs.

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Ghostery Liberated

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  • Ad-Blocker Ghostery Just Went Open Source—And Has a New Business Model

    In privacy-focused, anti-establishment corners of the internet, going open source can earn you a certain amount of street cred. It signals that you not only have nothing to hide, but also welcome the rest of the world to help make your project better. For Ghostery though, the company that makes Edward Snowden’s recommended ad blocker, publishing all its code on GitHub Thursday also means clearing up some confusion about its past.

  • Ghostery tool for web privacy goes open source

    Ghostery, a browser extension that blocks advertisers and web publishers from tracking your online behavior, has opened up its code so anyone with some programming chops can see exactly what's going on.

    Making Ghostery open-source software -- a program anyone can copy, modify and distribute -- means it's now possible for interested outsiders to get involved in its development, said Jeremy Tillman, director of product at Ghostery. And it should help clear the air lingering around Ghostery because of how its owner until last year, Evidon, did business.

OSS Leftovers

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Events: Red Hat Summit, LF Events, Cephalocon APAC, OpenStack PTG

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Kubernetes News

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  • Kubernetes Graduates CNCF Incubator, Debuts New Sandbox

    Though the Kubernetes container orchestration system has been widely deployed at scale in production around the world, it wasn't until March 6 that the project graduated from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation's (CNCF) incubator.

    The CNCF's process brings projects in as incubated projects and then aims to move them through to graduation, which implies a level of process and technology maturity. Kubernetes was the founding project for the CNCF, which was launched back in July 2015.

    Google contributed Kubernetes to the CNCF in an effort to help build a more diverse community of contributors and to spur adoption.

  • Kubernetes Ingress: NodePort, Load Balancers, and Ingress Controllers

    A fundamental requirement for cloud applications is some way to expose that application to your end users. This article will introduce the three general strategies in Kubernetes for exposing your application to your end users, and cover the various tradeoffs of each approach. I’ll then explore some of the more sophisticated requirements of an ingress strategy. Finally, I’ll give some guidelines on how to pick your Kubernetes ingress strategy.

  • Aqua Expands Container Security Platform With MicroEnforcer

    Aqua Security launched version 3.0 of its namesake container security platform on March 7, refocusing the product on providing Kubernetes cloud-native enterprise security controls.

    Aqua originally focused on just Docker container deployments, but with the new 3.0 update it is providing a series of capabilities that are aligned with Kubernetes deployments. Kubernetes provides container orchestration capabilities and has also been embraced by Docker Inc., which now also integrates Kubernetes as an option for its users.

    Looking beyond just Kubernetes, Aqua 3.0 also has a new capability called the MicroEnforcer, which is aimed at emerging forms of lightweight container deployments, such as the AWS Fargate service.

  • You got your VM in my container

    Containers and Kubernetes have been widely promoted as "disruptive" technologies that will replace everything that preceded them, most notably virtual machine (VM) management platforms such as vSphere and OpenStack. Instead, as with most platform innovations, Kubernetes is more often used to add a layer to (or complement) VMs. In this article, and in a presentation at SCALE16x, we'll be exploring two relatively new projects that aim to assist users in combining Kubernetes with virtualization: KubeVirt and Kata Containers.

    Most organizations still have large existing investments in applications that run on virtualized hosts, infrastructure that runs them, and tools to manage them. We can envision this being true for a long time to come, just as remnants of previous generations of technology remain in place now. Additionally, VM technology still offers a level of isolation that container-enablement features, like user namespaces, have yet to meet. However, those same organizations want the ease-of-use, scalability, and developer appeal of Kubernetes, as well as a way to gradually transition from virtualized workloads to containerized ones.

What is open source programming?

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At the simplest level, open source programming is merely writing code that other people can freely use and modify. But you've heard the old chestnut about playing Go, right? "So simple it only takes a minute to learn the rules, but so complex it requires a lifetime to master." Writing open source code is a pretty similar experience. It's easy to chuck a few lines of code up on GitHub, Bitbucket, SourceForge, or your own blog or site. But doing it right requires some personal investment, effort, and forethought.

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Cilium 1.0.0-rc4 Released: Transparently Secure Container Network Connectivity Utilising Linux BPF

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Cilium is open source software for transparently securing the network connectivity between application services deployed using Linux container management platforms like Docker and Kubernetes. Cilium 1.0.0-rc4 has recently been released, which includes: the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)-hosted Envoy configured as the default HTTP/gRPC proxy; the addition of a simple health overview for connectivity and other errors; and an improved scalable kvstore interaction layer.

Microservices applications tend to be highly dynamic, and this presents both a challenge and an opportunity in terms of securing connectivity between microservices. Modern approaches to overcoming this issue have coalesced around the CNCF-hosted Container Network Interface (CNI) and the increasingly popular "service mesh" technologies, such as Istio and Conduit. According to the Cilium documentation, traditional Linux network security approaches (such as iptables) filter on IP address and TCP/UDP ports. However, the highly volatile life cycle of containers and IP addresses cause these approaches to struggle to scale alongside the application as the large number of load balancing tables and access control lists must be updated continually.

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Radeon GPUs Are Increasingly Competing With NVIDIA GPUs On Latest RadeonSI/RADV Drivers

As it's been a few weeks since last delivering a modest Linux GPU comparison and given the continuously evolving state of the Linux kernel Git tree as well as the Mesa project that houses the RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan drivers, here are our latest benchmarks showing the current state of the AMD Radeon open-source Linux graphics driver performance relative to NVIDIA's long-standing and high-performance but proprietary driver using several different graphics cards. Read more

AMD And CTS Labs: A Story Of Failed Stock Manipulation

We have attempted to contact Jessica Schaefer from Bevel PR, the listed PR firm on the vulnerability disclosure website, only to be greeted by a full voicemail inbox. We attempted to contact both Bevel PR and CTS Labs by email and inquire about the relationship between CTS and Viceroy, and provided them with ample time to respond. They did not respond to our inquiry. So, let's look at Viceroy Research. According to MoneyWeb, Viceroy Research is headed by a 44-year-old British citizen and ex-social worker, John Fraser Perring, in conjunction with two 23-year-old Australian citizens, Gabriel Bernarde and Aidan Lau. I wonder which of these guys is so fast at typing. Viceroy Research was the group responsible for the uncovering of the Steinhoff accounting scandal, about which you can read more here. After successfully taking down Steinhoff, it tried to manufacture controversy around Capitec Bank, a fast-growing South African bank. This time it didn't work out so well. The Capitec stock price dropped shortly and quickly recovered when the South African reserve bank made a statement that Capitec's business is sound. Just a week ago Viceroy attempted to do the same thing with a German company called ProSieben, also with mixed success, and in alleged breach of German securities laws, according to BaFin (similar to the SEC). Now, it appears it is going after AMD, though it looks to be another unsuccessful attack. Investor Takeaway After the announcement of this news, AMD stock generally traded sideways with slight downward movement, not uncommon for AMD in general. Hopefully this article showed you that CTS's report is largely nonsense and a fabrication with perhaps a small kernel of truth hidden somewhere in the middle. If the vulnerabilities are confirmed by AMD, they are likely to be easily fixed by software patches. If you are long AMD, stay long. If you are looking for an entry point, this might be a good opportunity to use this fake news to your advantage. AMD is a company with a bright future if it continues to execute well, and we see it hitting $20 per share by the end of 2018. Read more

Canonical Officially Announces Mozilla's Firefox as a Snap App for Ubuntu Linux

The Firefox Snap package appears to be maintained by Mozilla, which allows Linux users to test drive the latest features of their Quantum browser on multiple GNU/Linux distributions that support Canonical's Snappy universal binary format. Developed by Canonical, the Snap universal application packaging format for Linux lets Linux users enjoy the most recent release of a software product as soon as it's released upstream. It's secure by design and works natively on multiple popular Linux OSes. Read more

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