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OSS

Female SanDisk engineer who made it in Silicon Valley offers her words of wisdom

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OSS
Sci/Tech

At Milpitas-based flash memory storage and software company SanDisk Corp., Nithya Ruff, director of the company’s open source strategy, is a huge driver behind science, technology, engineering and math initiatives to get more girls interested in the field. After growing up in Bangalore, India, Ruff learned to code at North Dakota State University, where she earned her computer science master’s degree.

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Also: 8 ways Portland tech companies can follow through on diversity talk

Doc sprint model helps teachers create course materials

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OSS

The materials sprint has many advantages when developing course materials. In addition to the very real benefit of developing additional ways for instructors to involve students in open source, the camaraderie of group development provides motivation and makes the experience fun!

Group development provides additional input into the activity development, while also providing additional eyes to proof and test the activity —similar to another FOSS motto that "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow." Involving industry professionals brought another set of benefits—their industry experience allowed us to make the activities more relevant and meaningful for students.

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Orca Open Source Screen Reader Adds Better Support for Google Docs in GNOME 3.18

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OSS
GNOME

The GNOME 3.17.3 desktop environment, a milestone towards GNOME 3.18, will be released in the coming days and will include major updates to some of the most essential core components, including the Orca open-source screen reader and magnifier.

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Interview with winner of the Red Hat Women in Open Source Community Award, Sarah Sharp

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Linux
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

Last year Red Hat announced its first Women in Open Source Award, created to recognize the contributions that women are making in open source technologies and communities. I was honored to be on one of the committees that reviewed more than 100 nominations and narrowed the list down to 10 finalists divided into two categories: community and academic. Then the open source community voted, and I anxiously awaited the results. I wanted every woman on both lists to win, so I knew that no matter who ended up with most votes, I'd be happy.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Interview with winner of Red Hat's Women in Open Source Academic Award, Kesha Shah

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Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

As an open source contributor, I began as a newbie and grew into a decent contributor thanks to working on many great projects. Today, I am mentoring new contributors on how to make their first contributions to open source. So, I think I can answer this question more elaborately.

Open source organizations have projects that need contributions from everyone, from all skills and levels of expertise. There are many non-coding ways too contribute as well, like: reporting issues, writing documentation, helping with design, trying previous versions, checking quality and translation, outreach for a product, and organizing events. Doing so helps you learn more about the open source project as well as to network with the community while adding positive contributions.

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Two simple reasons IBM loves free software

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OSS

For IBM, its love of Docker is part of a larger philosophy: Docker's main container technology is open source, meaning any developer anywhere can download the source code for free and put it to work however they want to.

Diaz is quick to remind people that IBM has a long history of boosting open source efforts, including leading the 1999 creation of the Apache Software Foundation, the non-profit that oversees the development of a lot of high-profile open source projects, including Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark.

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Weave 1.0 Debuts to Improve Docker Networking

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Server
OSS

Startup Weaveworks is updating its tools with the release of Weave 1.0 for Docker container networking. Weaveworks raised $5 million in venture funding back in December to help push its vision of container networking forward.

Since the funding event, Weaveworks has also debuted a monitoring and visualization open-source technology called Weave Scope, which will complement the new Weave 1.0 release.

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Russia to replace proprietary software with open source

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OSS

The Russian Ministry of Telecom and Mass Communications has announced a plan to replace proprietary software with open source and locally produced software. The plan is one of the measures aimed at promoting sustainable economic development and social stability announced earlier this year.

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Will Open Source Drive the Future of the Automotive Industry?

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OSS

And Tesla was none too soon in making that decision. Late in 2013, a company called OSVehicle was founded in 2015 in Hong Kong with an international focus. Their goal? Complete, do-it-yourself, Open Source cars that cost less than $10,000 and take just an hour to make. Now with a community numbering 10,000 of designers, programmers and fans, OSVehicle has released a variety of kits, cars and plans. Combined with the luxury and sport expertise Tesla brings to the table, making working, street-legal open source electric vehicles is now easier than ever before.

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