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Open source software could help India, Open Source in Cars

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  • Open source software could help India save Rs 8,254 crore in education alone: Study

    Use of free and open source software could help India save more than Rs 8,300 crore in government expenses on education and police only, says a new study, vindicating the Centre's move to promote such software as part of its Digital India initiative.

    Schools and other institutions could save an estimated Rs 8,254 crore by adopting free and open source software (FOSS) while police departments could save about Rs 51.20 crore, said a study led by Rahul De, Hewlett-Packard Chair Professor at the Indian Institute of Management Bangalore.

  • No driver, no problem: NJ's self-driving car developers

    While DriveAI’s work is coming on a much smaller scale than the tech giants of the world, its members take pride in one key aspect: The entire project is open-source.

    The team regularly posts updates on its progress and snags. Anyone can view the DriveAI source code and provide input or suggest changes.

    While other self-driving car divisions and companies are protecting their work behind lock and key, DriveAI’s project will be free for anyone to apply and use for their own work.

    “Google’s going to write a bunch of proprietary code. All these car manufacturers are going to write their own proprietary code,” team member Parth Mehrotra said. “It’s a lot of wasted effort if everybody does the same thing again and again.

    “If ours isn’t up to par or where the industry wants the technology to be, they can contribute the manpower to it,” he said.

    An open-source project allows researchers across the globe to weigh in and suggest changes to the software. The company has already addressed issues raised by someone with a master’s degree in computer science who simply read over the source code.

    “What good is all of this technology if people can’t access it or have control over it?” Shoyoye said. “What good is collecting data if you can’t analyze it? People around the world can analyze this in real time and understand how autonomous vehicles are working in real time. That can only propel it forward.”

  • The only way to ensure the VW scandal never happens again

    Most people realize that computers aren't going to go away any time soon. That doesn't mean that people have to put up with these deceptions and intrusions on our lives.

    For years, many leading experts in the software engineering world have been promoting the benefits and principles of free software.

    What we mean by free is that users, regulators and other independent experts should have the freedom to see and modify the source code in the equipment that we depend on as part of modern life. In fact, experts generally agree that there is no means other than software freedom to counter the might of corporations like Volkswagen and their potential to misuse that power, as demonstrated in the emissions testing scandal.

    If Governments and regulators want to be taken seriously and protect society, isn't it time that they insisted that the car industry replaces all hidden code with free and open source software?

OSS Leftovers

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  • Sorry Microsoft, sometimes open source is just better (and free)

    There can be several reasons to resort to open source software solutions. Sometimes, it's simply the only suitable offering out there. Others, it's the best of its breed. And when expense is an issue, you can't beat a zero dollar price tag. In any case, open source is an option you can't ignore.

    As regular readers know, we've lived in a post-MS Office world for a while now. Free office suite LibreOffice does all we want and its Writer module works better than Word. Version 5, released last month, introduces a better organised command centre, Windows 10 compatibility, a style preview panel, short codes that enable quick insertion of emojis and other symbols and the ability to crop images inside the word processor.

    Whether all these new features matter to every user is not the point. The point is that LibreOffice develops under democratic principles, where users can vote on the features they want most. And since the development team has no commercial reason to hold back new features to maximise the profitability of older versions, enhancements flow through shortly after they're ready.

  • How Open Source and Crowdfunding Are Creating a New Business Niche
  • Google's new squeeze: Brotli compression open-sourced
  • How Open Source Is Changing Enterprises

    There was once a time when IT vendors shunned the idea of open source. Why wouldn’t they? The idea of sharing their very own programming innovations with others was viewed as detrimental to any competitive business. But nearly 20 years on, open source is now in vogue and has been embraced by some of the biggest IT vendors and their clients. So what changed? We find out.

  • Three students jump into open source with OpenMRS and Sahana Eden

    We are three students in the Bachelor of Computer Science second degree program at the University of British Columbia (UBC). As we each have cooperative education experience, our technical ability and contributions have increasingly become a point of focus as we approach graduation. Our past couple of years at UBC have allowed us to produce some great technical content, but we all found ourselves with one component noticeably absent from our resumes: an open source contribution. While the reasons for this are varied, they all stem from the fact that making a contribution involves a set of skills that goes far beyond anything taught in the classroom or even learned during an internship. It requires a person to be outgoing with complete strangers, to be proactive in seeking out problems to solve, and to have effective written communication.

  • 3 Open Source Desktop Publishing Tools for Small Businesses

    Small businesses and start-ups are always on the lookout for ways to save money on new and expensive services. Many budget-minded small businesses are returning to the days of hands-on and in-house to keep costs down, and the many open source tools available today can help do just that.

  • 14 tips for teaching open source development

    Academia is an excellent platform for training and preparing the open source developers of tomorrow. In research, we occasionally open source software we write. We do this for two reasons. One, to promote the use of the tools we produce. And two, to learn more about the impact and issues other people face when using them. With this background of writing research software, I was tasked with redesigning the undergraduate software engineering course for second-year students at the University of Bradford.

  • Cloudera's open source codeathon project with Bay Area Discovery Museum

Evolution of Apache Hadoop

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The year 2016 will see Americans lining up to elect their new president. While passion and sentiments will dictate the outcome of the elections on the surface, deep down, modern technology will be at play, helping determine who will be the next president. These elections will harness the power of Big Data on a scale never done before. We have already seen the role that Big Data played in 2012 elections, and it’s only going to get bigger. This Big Data revolution is led by, as expected, open source and Apache Hadoop, in particular.

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On OpenStack: Coders to learn how to deploy humanitarian-focused apps on OpenStack

Open Source Storage Joins OpenStack® Foundation, Appoints Patrick Willis as Board Member

FOSS Events

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Being Thoughtful About FOSS History

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Time to saddle up the rant stallion and take him out of the stable: This comes up from time to time on social media — as it did again several days ago — and it’s really about time it stops.

Dennis Ritchie and Steve Jobs died pretty close to each other, time-wise. That may sound like the start of a joke — “Dennis Ritchie and Steve Jobs meet at the pearly gates, and…” — but we’re not going there today. Many people are under the impression that while Steve Jobs got all the attention as the “messiah of computing” when he died, Dennis Ritchie was completely ignored.

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The EPA Deserves Software Freedom, Too

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The issue of software freedom is, not surprisingly, not mentioned in the mainstream coverage of Volkswagen's recent use of proprietary software to circumvent important regulations that exist for the public good. Given that Volkswagen is an upstream contributor to Linux, it's highly likely that Volkswagen vehicles have Linux in them.

Thus, we have a wonderful example of how much we sacrifice at the altar of “Linux adoption”. While I'm glad for some Free Software to appear in products rather than none, I also believe that, too often, our community happily accepts the idea that we should gratefully laud a company includes a bit of Free Software in their product, and gives a little code back, even if most of what they do is proprietary software.

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Also: VW scandal highlights irony of EPA opposition to vehicle software tinkering

OSS Leftovers

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  • More for Less: How the Open Source Software Revolution Can Mitigate Unnecessary Expenditure

    The board may be reluctant to move away from a big, branded, closed source solution. But the fact is, Open Source Software can now do the same for less.

  • Open Source Code May Unite IoT

    A high profile open source project working on software-defined networks has given birth to what could become an important standard for bringing unity to the fragmented Internet of Things.

  • Google launches Brotli, a new open source compression algorithm to speed up the web

    As websites and online services become ever more demanding, the need for compression increases exponentially. Fans of Silicon Valley will be aware of the Pied Piper compression algorithm, and now Google has a more efficient one of its own.

  • Splunk admits open source challengers can’t be ignored, but says it has advantage

    If you type the words ‘open source Splunk’ into Google, you’ll soon find a bunch of articles that talk up the challenge posed to Splunk by cheaper, open source alternatives. One even used the headline “In a world of open source big data, Splunk should not exist”, whilst another says “Splunk feels the heat from stronger, cheaper open source rivals”.

    And it’s true that when you think about big data and the Internet-of-Things (IoT), a number of open source technologies spring to mind. But is Splunk worried?

  • Get your own cloud and reclaim your data

    Frank Karlitschek founded ownCloud, a personal cloud platform that also happens to be open source, in 2011. Why open source? Frank has some strong opinions about how we host and share our data, and with the recent scrutiny on security and privacy, his thoughts are even more relevant. In this interview, I ask Frank some questions I've been wondering about my own personal data as well as how ownCloud might play a role in a more open, yet secure, data future.

    A little history on Frank: He is a long time open source contributor and former board member of the KDE e.V. After 10 years of managing engineering teams, today he is the project leader and maintainer of ownCloud. Additionally he is the co-founder and CTO of ownCloud Inc. which offers ownCloud for enterprises.

  • Open source is ugly: Improving UI and UX

    For four years, Garth has been working at Adobe on open source projects as a design and code contributor. These projects include Brackets, Topcoat, and Apache Flex. In addition to his work at Adobe, he also speaks at conferences about the power of design, improving designer/developer collaboration, and the benefits of open source. As part of this effort, Garth founded the Open Design Foundation.

  • Facebook takes Relay JavaScript framework open source

    Facebook this week is open-sourcing Relay, which provides data-fetching for React JavaScript applications. The move could open up new possibilities for the technology, Facebook engineers said.

    Accessible on GitHub, Relay is a JavaScript framework for developing data-driven applications with React, Facebook's JavaScript library for building user interfaces. "Relay is actually intended to build and do for data-fetching what React does for the user interface rendering," said Tom Occhino, Facebook engineering manager, in an interview at this week's @scale conference in San Jose, Calif.

Yes, the FCC might ban your operating system

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Over the last few weeks a discussion has flourished over the FCC’s Notification of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) on modular transmitters and electronic labels for wireless devices. Some folks have felt that the phrasing has been too Chicken-Little-like and that the FCC’s proposal doesn’t affect the ability to install free, libre or open source operating system. The FCC in fact says their proposal has no effect on open source operating systems or open source in general. The FCC is undoubtedly wrong.

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OSS Leftovers

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  • GNU/Linux Touted As Safe Replacement For Illegal Software In Bangladesh
  • FOSS the Solution to Piracy, Newspaper Says

    On September 9, a Bangladeshi English language newspaper, Dhaka Tribune, reported that the country’s Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Task Force and Copyright officials had seized 69 laptops with pirated Microsoft software and arrested two high ranking officials at Flora, one of Bangladesh’s largest computer retailers. The raid came after two years of newspaper ads sponsored by the country’s Copyright Office warning about the legal implications of selling pirated goods.

  • AT&T's Chiosi: Unite on Open Source or Suffer

    The telecom industry needs to agree on how it wants the various pieces of open source to come together in a platform for the future, AT&T's Margaret Chiosi said here Thursday. Otherwise, there is the risk of a splintered effort that will ultimately slow critical network transformation.

    Chiosi, a Distinguished Network Architect at AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) who is also president of the Open Platform for NFV Project Inc. and one of the original players in the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) NFV ISG, explained why open source is critical to AT&T's Integrated Cloud (AIC) architecture -- its converged services platform moving forward -- and outlined the numerous open source groups in which the telecom giant is participating, which span 700 different projects.

  • Google's Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software uses Tesseract

    Google's OCR is probably using dependencies of Tesseract, an OCR engine released as free software, or OCRopus, a free document analysis and optical character recognition (OCR) system that is primarily used in Google Books. Developed as a community project during 1995-2006 and later taken over by Google, Tesseract is considered one of the most accurate OCR engines and works for over 60 languages. The source code is available on GitHub.

  • Modest CEO on open source and acquisition by PayPal

    Professionally, Harper was CTO of Threadless and then CTO of Obama for America. He's currently CEO of Modest, Inc., which was recently acquired by PayPal. I asked him what really drives him and he said, "I like to have fun and do interesting things." Also, in a talk Harper gave in Sweden in 2014, he said that he strives to hire people who looked different from him. In this interview, I ask him more about that and his upcoming All Things Open talk.

  • Google, Twitter Forge Open Source Publishing Partnership

    Google will be coming late to the publishing party, having failed to challenge Facebook with its own social media platforms -- the short-lived Google Buzz and the faltering Google+, noted SEO researcher Joshua J. Bachynski. Google's inability to understand its user base has forced it to form an uneasy partnership with Twitter and others, he suggested.

  • Shopping for a Browser

    I remain deeply suspicious of Chrome, since it has been reported to be snooping on its users and reporting back to Google. And, sadly, the latest news from Firefox is discouraging. It's possible that that adware and snoopware will be left out of Mozilla's SeaMonkey browser, which I have recently installed.

  • The Firefox Is in the Hen House

    For a variety of reasons that nobody outside of Mozilla seems to completely understand, Mozilla ended its relationship with Google late last year to ink a deal with Yahoo. Some pundits are figuring that Yahoo offered better terms and that Mozilla stands to make more money now than before, especially since it’s now selling default search on a country-by-country basis instead of carte blanche for the entire planet. Others say the change in affiliation had little to do with money, but was brought about by ideological reasons, basically revolving around Mozilla’s Do Not Track system, which Google does not support. Reportedly, as part of the new deal, Yahoo has agreed to abide by Do Not Track requests.

    Whether Mozilla receives more income from Yahoo than it did from Google is questionable, even if a majority of Firefox users keep Yahoo instead of flipping the switch to Google search, which is doubtful. Certainly, a recent move by Mozilla might indicate that the new deal with Yahoo isn’t as fruitful as the organization had hoped and that it’s scrambling to create new revenue streams.

  • Forza open-source: Italian military to adopt LibreOffice
  • Age-old question: Can commercial software succeed in an open-source world?

    It became the first $1 billion open source company three years ago and closed its last fiscal year in February at almost $1.8 billion in revenue. That is not chump change, but it’s a far cry from the run rates proprietary software companies tout.

  • VSCO Keys is now an open source project hosted on Github

    VSCO says code for the installer can be found on Github. The company also notes “while the current layout editor has been discontinued, users can continue to edit their layouts with a text editor using resources that have been provided in the source code.”

  • VSCO Keys Lives On By Going Free and Open Source
  • GhostBSD 10.1 Is Now Available for Download with MATE and Xfce Flavors

    GhostBSD's Eric Turgeon has the great pleasure of informing us earlier today, September 13, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of GhostBSD 10.1.

  • Chris Webber talks about Guix in Chicago, September 30th
  • Infinity compiler
  • Apple uses Mesos, 3D printed syringe, and more news
  • SGA looks into open-source textbooks as alternative for UMD students

    On the heels of the University of Maryland University College announcing its plans to eliminate textbooks this fall, the SGA is exploring the viability of open-source textbooks as a cheaper alternative for University of Maryland students.

  • Virtual Reality & Open Source

    OSVR is backed by many major companies, such as Intel, Ubisoft, Valve and GearBox, as well as by a long list of universities. The project also boasts many contributors of software design, sensory support, virtual world design, etc.

  • GitLab raises $4 million for its hugely popular open-source GitHub alternative

    Developer collaboration services are back on investors’ agenda. Two months after leading a $1.5 million round into GitLab Inc., Khosla Ventures is coming back for more and pouring an additional $4 million into the startup’s coffers to help ramp its battle against the better-known and better-funded competition.

  • We are the Knights who code Ni!

AT&T's Chiosi: Unite on Open Source or Suffer

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The telecom industry needs to agree on how it wants the various pieces of open source to come together in a platform for the future, AT&T's Margaret Chiosi said here Thursday. Otherwise, there is the risk of a splintered effort that will ultimately slow critical network transformation.

Chiosi, a Distinguished Network Architect at AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) who is also president of the Open Platform for NFV Project Inc. and one of the original players in the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) NFV ISG, explained why open source is critical to AT&T's Integrated Cloud (AIC) architecture -- its converged services platform moving forward -- and outlined the numerous open source groups in which the telecom giant is participating, which span 700 different projects.

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Wine Staging: Release 1.7.52

Some minutes ago we released Wine Staging 1.7.52. This is the first release after WineConf 2015 and the integration into WineHQ. Some of the changes related to the integration have been realized in the meantime and you should now use the WineHQ bug tracker for reporting bugs. Just open them as regular Wine bugs and mention the used wine version. Although this news is mostly about the source code changes, I would like to mention that Arch Linux now provides an official package which is also named wine-staging and therefore conflicts with our packages. The package installs into /usr instead of /opt/wine-staging so you might run into conflicts with other wine versions. Take a look at our Wiki for more information. Read more

today's leftovers

  • A gentle introduction to microservices
    What are microservices? Have you heard the phrase "microservices" used in a discussion of modern application development and wondered what it's all about?
  • There's A Lot Of Exciting AMDGPU DRM Code Brewing For Eventual Catalyst Support
    One of the big items still in the works as part of AMD's unified Linux driver strategy is that the Catalyst proprietary driver will be isolated to user-space and make use of the AMDGPU kernel DRM driver. Being publicly now in development in a few code branches are changes to the AMD DRM code for beginning to suit more of it to Catalyst's driver design.
  • Linux Kernel 4.2.3 Is Out with Open vSwitch and IPv6 Fixes, Updated Networking Drivers
    After only 4 days from the release of the second maintenance version of the Linux 4.2 kernel series, Greg Kroah-Hartman comes today, October 3, with news about the release of Linux kernel 4.2.3.
  • Linux Foundation Says Open Source Code Worth $5 Billion
  • Mesa 10.6.9 Released, Marks The End Of The Line: Upgrade To Mesa 11
    Emil Velikov announced Mesa 10.6.9 today as the newest point release for the aging Mesa 10.6 series. Mesa 10.6.9 fixes an Intel crash issue with KDE, Unreal Tournament is fixed for Gallium3D drivers, and there are various other Mesa OpenGL fixes.
  • GNOME's 2014 Annual Report Published
    For those wondering about the state of GNOME, their annual report is now available. The GNOME Foundation 2014 annual report covers their financial situation, their trademark battle with GroupOn, their temporary financial shortfall due to the OPW project, the hack/developer events engaged in, and much more.
  • KDE Plasma 5.4.2, bugfix Release for October, is already landing in Kubuntu Wily
  • Kubuntu 15.10 Will Have KDE Plasma 5.4.2
    Kubuntu 15.10 "Wily Werewolf" is being released later this month and it will feature the very latest KDE Plasma 5.4 point release. Plasma 5.4.2 isn't being released until next week but the Kubuntu crew is pushing it early into 15.10 Wily now to ensure it arrives with the 15.10 debut.
  • Randa Meetings update
    I am really not a person who blogs much and its bit late, please bare with me in case if anyone does not like the way article is written or how it is formatted. I really feel good being KDE user since 2005. Officially I started coding / contributing to minor stuff in KDE in 2010. Switzerland is an awesome place and I really liked Randa. Speaking of Switzerland, for me those trains are art of engineering. I would like to thank KDE e.v. and other sponsors for making this event happen.
  • KaOS 2015.10 Officially Released with a Gorgeous KDE Plasma 5.4 Desktop, Wayland Session
    On October 2, Anke Boersma had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the KaOS 2015.10 GNU/Linux computer operating system.
  • KaOS 2015.10 KDE-focused Linux distro available now
    While I am a GNOME fan, I recognize how wonderful KDE is too. If you prefer a traditional desktop user interface, KDE is a smart choice. Not only is it it easy to use for beginners, but it offers a ton of customization options for advanced users too. There are quite a few KDE-based Linux distros, such as Kubuntu, Linux Mint KDE, and Netrunner, but the lesser known KaOS offers a more pure experience. This distro has a goal of remaining lean, while being fairly bleeding edge regarding KDE packages -- it is a great showcase for the desktop environment. Today, version 2015.10 sees release, and you can download it now.
  • Network Security Toolkit 22-7248 Screenshot Tour
  • SparkyLinux 4.1 KDE Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 15 Released
    Calculate Linux 15 was released today in its KDE, MATE, and Xfce desktop spins along with Calculate Linux Directory Server, Linux Scratch, Scratch Server, and Media Center editions.
  • Ubuntu To Make It Easier To Ship Micro-Release Updates, New Features Post-LTS
    Generally Ubuntu Linux hasn't allowed new minor point releases of software to be sent down as stable release updates (SRUs) once the Ubuntu release ships, but there's been many exceptions, and now Ubuntu's Technical Board has agreed to make changes to make it easier to send down micro-release updates as well as offering new features to existing LTS (Long-Term Support) releases.

Manjaro 15.09 (Bellatrix) Update With Calamares Installer, Tweaks And Latest Applications

Manjaro Linux Bellatrix 15.09 released

Manjaro Linux 15.09, codenamed Bellatrix has been released with some tweaks into the graphical and terminal installer. The release makes it easier to install Manjaro on your system. Also the latest apps have been included in the Bellatrix. The Manjaro is easy to use Linux distribution, so give it a try from 15.09 with easy to install graphical interface.

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