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SitePoint on FOSS

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OSS
  • The Power of Open Source in the Foundation Framework

    CSS frameworks are among the most actively used tools in web design and development. If you’ve been involved in the industry, at some point you would have heard, seen or used a CSS framework or library before. What many developers do not realise is that these frameworks flourish thanks to the open source movement.

    Frameworks like Bootstrap and ZURB’s Foundation offer a platform for rapid prototyping, getting your site up and running by providing all of the common building blocks. Bootstrap and Foundation are just two popular examples, there are hundreds if not thousands of great frameworks out there that aim to make your job easier and speed up your development work.

  • How Your Company Can Benefit from Contributing to Open Source

    Open source is the antithesis of proprietary software. It’s the free lovin’ hippie amid a sea of corporate profiteers. Defined as software for which the source code is freely available to view, modify, and redistribute, open source software has benefited hardened coders and layman consumers alike. But just because it’s free doesn’t mean profit-driven companies can’t use open source to their advantage.

  • Free as in Puppy — Open Sourcing Your JavaScript Code

    Open Source is much more than making something available to the public. It is not only about your code, it is also about licenses, understanding participation and herding cats a.k.a. dealing with community issues. In this article we will briefly look at the benefits of open sourcing your code and the pitfalls to avoid.

Mastodon is an open source, decentralized version of Twitter

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OSS

So, you want to share your thoughts on social media, but you're tired of the way apps like Facebook and Twitter monopolize your posts and feed. It might be time to try an entirely new alternative: Mastodon.

Mastodon bills itself as a free, open-source social media server. Like Twitter, it's a microblogging platform. Unlike Twitter, it's non-commercial and not centrally owned, so you don't have to worry about what will happen to your account or your posts if it gets acquired by another company.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • How to strengthen your agile heartbeat with powerful retrospectives
  • Python versus R for machine learning and data analysis

    Machine learning and data analysis are two areas where open source has become almost the de facto license for innovative new tools. Both the Python and R languages have developed robust ecosystems of open source tools and libraries that help data scientists of any skill level more easily perform analytical work.

    The distinction between machine learning and data analysis is a bit fluid, but the main idea is that machine learning prioritizes predictive accuracy over model interpretability, while data analysis emphasizes interpretability and statistical inference. Python, being more concerned with predictive accuracy, has developed a positive reputation in machine learning. R, as a language for statistical inference, has made its name in data analysis.

  • Geode: The Latest Apache Big Data Project to Graduate to Top-Level Status

    In recent months, we've steadily taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent times. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu had graduated as a Top-Level project.

  • Open Source Week at SitePoint

    At SitePoint, we are proud supporters of Open Source. Regular SitePoint readers may have noticed that! Open is in the DNA of many topics we cover by design; GitHub alone is evidence enough, as it’s pretty much a standard tool for most developers nowadays.

  • Education management with Moodle: The beginning, middle, and today

    Moodle is the de facto standard in open source learning management systems. It is described as "a learning platform designed to provide educators, administrators and learners with a single robust, secure and integrated system to create personalised learning environments." Plus, Moodle is free software, licensed under the GPL.

    Martin Dougiamas, Moodle's founder and lead developer, generously took time from his busy schedule to have a good, long talk with me about why he created it, where it is today, and what's next in open education.

  • Hackathons and bite-sized procurement requests

    Public administrations that want to work with open source communities should organise hackathons and other meetings on software development. They should also publish calls for tender that can be answered by individuals and small businesses. These are some preliminary recommendations from the OSOR workshop at the Paris Open Source Summit last Wednesday.

  • Last batch of ColorHugALS

    I’ve got 9 more ColorHugALS devices in stock and then when they are sold they will be no more for sale. With all the supplier costs going recently up my “sell at cost price” has turned into “make a small loss on each one” which isn’t sustainable. It’s all OpenHardware, both hardware design and the firmware itself so if someone wanted to start building them for sale they would be doing it with my blessing. Of course, I’m happy to continue supporting the existing sold devices into the distant future.

  • Programmers are having a huge discussion about the unethical and illegal things they’ve been asked to do

    Earlier this week, a post written by programmer and teacher Bill Sourour went viral. It's called "Code I’m Still Ashamed Of."

    In it he recounts a horrible story of being a young programmer who landed a job building a website for a pharmaceutical company. The whole post is worth a read, but the upshot is he was duped into helping the company skirt drug advertising laws in order to persuade young women to take a particular drug.

    He later found out the drug was known to worsen depression and at least one young woman committed suicide while taking it. He found out his sister was taking the drug and warned her off it.

NAS4Free 11 BSD-Based Open Source Storage NAS Distribution Officially Released

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OSS
BSD

On November 20, 2016, the development team behind the open-source, FreeBSD-based storage NAS (Network-Attached Storage) distribution promoted the NAS4Free 11 series to the stable channel.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • In memoriam: Pieter Hintjens

    Former FFII President, erstwhile OFE collaborator, and personal friend, Pieter Hintjens, passed away last month at the age of 53. Pieter was a programmer, an influential thinker, and a prolific writer who inspired many. While we did not always agree, I always appreciated the intelligence and passion he brought to everything he did. He will be much missed.

  • Best open source management tools

    Open source software provides an attractive alternative to more costly commercial products, but can open source products deliver enterprise-grade results? To answer this question we tested four open source products: OpenNMS, Pandora FMS, NetXMS and Zabbix. All four products were surprisingly good. We liked Pandora FMS for its ease of installation and modern user interface. In general, we found configuration to be easier and more intuitive with Pandora than the other contenders. NetXMS came in a close second with a nice user interface, easy to configure rules and a solid user manual. Overall, we found all four products suitable for enterprise use, particularly in small-to-midsize environments

  • Pandora FMS wins open-source management shootout

    Doing more with less remains an ongoing challenge for IT execs. Making sure everything keeps humming along to meet service-level agreements can be challenging for resource-stretched IT departments. For all but the smallest shops, effective monitoring requires tools that provide a meta view of the entire infrastructure with drill-down capabilities.

  • 4 ways to open up your project's infrastructure

    Open source isn't just about opening up your code—it's also about building a supporting infrastructure that invites people to contribute. In order to create a vibrant, growing, and exciting project, the community needs to be able to participate in the governance, the documentation, the code, and the actual structures that keep the project alive. If the overall "hive" is doing well, it attracts more individuals with diverse skills to the project.

  • Minoca, it's 'another' lightweight OS for IoT

    New on the scene is recent times is Minoca OS, a general purpose open source operating system written specifically to conserve power, storage and memory.

  • Upstream training, scientific research, and more OpenStack news

    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

  • Early Stage Startup Heptio Aims to Make Kubernetes Friendly

    Two Former Google staffers the built the original Google Compute Engine and helped to create Kubernetes are launching their own company to fill a perceived gap in the container orchestration market.

    Heptio was officially announced on Nov. 17, as yet another company in the ever-growing landscape of vendors aiming to support the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. Heptio is noteworthy in that it was recently founded and led by the same two Google staffers, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, that originally created Kubernetes in the first place.

  • GLobjects 1.0.0 Released For OpenGL Aide

    GLobjects 1.0.0 has been released as an open-source library designed to make OpenGL usage "modern, less cluttered, and less error-prone."

    GLobjects 1.0 is derived from glbinding and OpenGL Mathematics and provides a object-oriented C++-based interface.

Linux and FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS
  • Speak at The Linux Foundation’s Invite-Only Open Source Leadership Summit

    The Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit (formerly known as Collaboration Summit) is where the world’s thought leaders in open source software and collaborative development convene to share best practices and learn how to create and advance the open source infrastructure that runs our lives.

    The Linux Foundation is now seeking executives, business and technical leaders, open source program office leaders, and open source foundation and project leaders to share your knowledge, best practices and strategies with fellow leaders at OSLS, to be held Feb. 14-16, 2017, in Lake Tahoe, CA.

  • LLVM Developer Meeting 2016 Videos Posted

    The videos from the LLVM Developer Meeting 2016 conference that took place at the beginning of November are now online.

  • Outreachy Winter 2016 Projects/Participants Announced

    The accepted participants and their projects for the Outreachy Winter 2016 session were announced earlier this month for helping females and other under-represented groups engage in free software development.

Trends in the Open Source Cloud: A Shift to Microservices and the Public Cloud

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OSS

Cloud computing is the cornerstone of the digital economy. Companies across industries now use the cloud -- private, public or somewhere in between -- to deliver their products and services.

A recent survey of industry analysis and research that we conducted for our 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud report produced overwhelming evidence of this.

Forty-one percent of all enterprise workloads are currently running in some type of public or private cloud, according to 451 Research. That number is expected to rise to 60 percent by mid-2018. And Rightscale reports that some 95 percent of companies are at least experimenting in the cloud. Enterprises are continuing to shift workloads to the cloud as their expertise and experience with the technology increases.

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4 ways to open up your project's infrastructure

Filed under
OSS

Open source isn't just about opening up your code—it's also about building a supporting infrastructure that invites people to contribute. In order to create a vibrant, growing, and exciting project, the community needs to be able to participate in the governance, the documentation, the code, and the actual structures that keep the project alive. If the overall "hive" is doing well, it attracts more individuals with diverse skills to the project.

Read more

Best open source management tools

Filed under
OSS

Open source software provides an attractive alternative to more costly commercial products, but can open source products deliver enterprise-grade results? To answer this question we tested four open source products: OpenNMS, Pandora FMS, NetXMS and Zabbix. All four products were surprisingly good. We liked Pandora FMS for its ease of installation and modern user interface. In general, we found configuration to be easier and more intuitive with Pandora than the other contenders. NetXMS came in a close second with a nice user interface, easy to configure rules and a solid user manual. Overall, we found all four products suitable for enterprise use, particularly in small-to-midsize environments.

Read more

The “open” in France has moved forward

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OSS

“Things have changed. I believe that this government can be credited with being the one that has carried more than ever the stake of the Open in our country”, said Axelle Lemaire, France’s Secretary of State in charge of Digital Affairs, at the Paris Open Source Summit 2016, last week

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More in Tux Machines

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

So you have a Raspberry Pi, or you’re thinking of getting one, and you want to know how to get started and how to become a master user of one. The Raspberry Pi is a single board computer, meaning that in many ways it's a regular PC, except that everything that makes up the computer is on a single board rather than a traditional PC, which has a motherboard and requires a number of additional daughterboards to make a whole unit. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun Hardcore Tactical Stealth Game Out on Linux
    More and more AAA games are coming to our beloved Linux platform, and nothing makes us happier than to see Daedalic Entertainment's Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun title launching today on Steam for Linux, Mac, and Windows. If you're not familiar with Daedalic Entertainment's work, they are the creators of the superb and fun Deponia series, but Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun is something different, a tactical stealth-strategy game in the style of the Commandos stealth-oriented real-time tactics video game series.
  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun, the top-down stealth game is now out
    Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun [GOG, Steam, Official Site] is the rather good top-down stealth game from Mimimi Productions. It's now out way a day-1 Linux release and it has a demo. I played the demo and I was massively impressed, so impressed that I would very much like to cover the game properly. So I will be reaching out to the developer for a key.
  • The Keeper, a promising looking side-scrolling survival action game with plenty of action is coming to Linux
    The Keeper side-scrolling survival action game full of boss battles, a combo system for combat and a day and night cycle will come to Linux.
  • Editorial: A chat about asking developers for a Linux port
    It has come to my attention recently that some people have been taking a really hard stance against developers who want to gauge interest for a Linux port. I want to talk about it for a bit. [...] Be the Linux community I know and love, be helpful to developers, get in on beta testing when you can (I’ve seen plenty of developers give out free keys for this too!) and appreciate the good games we get. We are a smaller market in most people’s eyes, so let’s not turn away anything that could help us grow even a little. The fact is, I’ve seen multiple games only come to Linux because Linux fans showed actual interest in it. One such example is Nightside, which I discovered on Steam. After a quick chat with the developer, I was able to convince them to do a Linux build and after a short test they then decided to do support a Linux build. There’s many such examples like this, but due to the amount of games I cover that’s one I could quickly pull up (without having to sift through hundreds of articles).
  • Dawn of War II has a minor patch to fix a few issues
  • Khronos are working on an open standard for VR, Valve will use it
  • BOOR, a new puzzle platformer will arrive with Linux support next year
    BOOR [Official Site] is a new puzzle platformer from developer Dazlog Studio and publisher BadLand Games that will have Linux support. We have many puzzle platformers now, so I do hope BOOR has something to set itself apart from the rest of them. I haven't seen anything in the trailer or the feature list that really jumps out at me. I am hoping when they reveal more gameplay it will look more enticing.
  • The developers of 'EVERSPACE' are still working on the Linux version, seeking help from Epic Games
    EVERSPACE [Steam, Official Site] is the fantastic looking UE4 space shooter that's being ported to Linux, but the developers have encountered a problem with lighting bugs. I follow the topic on Steam, but a user also emailed this in to ask me to highlight it. I would have anyway since I'm interested in it.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER - Realm of The Wood Elves DLC will come to Linux soon
    Total War: WARHAMMER - Realm of The Wood Elves [Steam] is the next DLC that introduces an exciting race into this strategy game. Feral have confirmed it will be on Linux soon with the quick tweet they sent out.
  • DoomRL or 'DRL' as it's now called has gone open source
    After ZeniMax sent the lawyers knocking, the developer of what was called DoomRL (Doom Roguelike) has changed it's name to 'DRL' [Github, Official Site] and it's now open source. ZeniMax are well within their rights to "protect" the Doom brand, but I still think their lawyers are idiotic for doing this. It's not like small-time roguelike was actually competing with the real Doom.

High School's Help Desk Teaches Open Source IT Skills

The following is an adapted excerpt from chapter six of The Open Schoolhouse: Building a Technology Program to Transform Learning and Empower Students, a new book written by Charlie Reisinger, Technology Director for Penn Manor School District in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. In the book, Reisinger recounts more than 16 years of Linux and open source education success stories. Penn Manor schools saved over a million dollars by trading proprietary software for open source counterparts with its student laptop program. The budget is only part of the story. As Linux moved out of the server room and onto thousands of student laptops, a new learning community emerged. Read more

What’s New with Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8?

I’m pleased to announce the release of the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8. As always, we focused on improving code quality, security hardening as well as enabling new features. One area of interest and particular focus is new feature support for ARM servers. Over the last few months, we’ve seen a surge of patches from various ARM vendors that have collaborated on a wide range of updates from new drivers to architecture to security. Read more