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OSS Leftovers

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Latest on OpenStack in Sydney

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OSS
  • Commonwealth Bank to take OpenStack approach to its public cloud environment

    A survey from the OpenStack Foundation has highlighted the growth of users among mainstream, non-IT industries, with the financial services sector one of the fastest growing.

    To emphasise the importance of open source in the Australian financial services sector, head of systems engineering for analytics and information at the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) Quinton Anderson detailed his bank's journey, starting with OpenStack in some basic container environments before layering additional open-source technologies.

  • Open-source community has an integration problem: OpenStack

    At the OpenStack Sydney Summit, community leaders announced a new plan to overcome challenges in integrating and operating open-source technologies to solve real-world problems.

    Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation, said on Monday the open source community hasn't historically been good at integration, and highlighted that innovation alone isn't enough to make it work.

  • Edge computing moves the open cloud beyond the data center

    When we think of cloud computing, most of us envision large-scale, centralized data centers running thousands of physical servers. As powerful as that vision sounds, it actually misses the biggest new opportunity: distributed cloud infrastructure.

    Today, almost every company in every industry sector needs near-instant access to data and compute resources to be successful. Edge computing pushes applications, data and computing power services away from centralized data centers to the logical extremes of a network, close to users, devices and sensors. It enables companies to put the right data in the right place at the right time, supporting fast and secure access. The result is an improved user experience and, oftentimes, a valuable strategic advantage. The decision to implement an edge computing architecture is typically driven by the need for location optimization, security, and most of all, speed.

    New applications such as VR and AI, with requirements to collect and process massive amounts of data in near-real-time and extremely low latency, are driving the need for processing at the edge of the network. Very simply, the cost and distance of the hub-and-spoke model will not be practical for many of these emerging use cases.

OpenStack in Sydney

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Server
OSS
  • OpenStack to tackle open source integration

    The OpenStack Foundation made its announcement, kicking off the OpenStack Summit currently running in Sydney at the Darling Harbour International Convention Centre.

  • OpenStack Summit Sydney Spotlights Open Infrastructure Integration
  • OpenStack says its work is largely done. Now your hard work can fill in the blanks

    The OpenStack Foundation has kicked off its summit in Sydney, Australia, with a call to current OpenStack users to help it to win more users by sharing code they've written to link OpenStack to other tools and infrastructure.

    The Foundation's decided the time is right to pursue easier integration because it feels the core of OpenStack is in good shape: its myriad modules are felt to be nicely mature and to offer the functionality that users need and want.

  • WeChat parent company Tencent joins the OpenStack Foundation as a Gold Member

    Shenzhen-based Tencent Holdings Limited, the parent company behind extremely popular services like WeChat and QQ, today announced that it is joining the OpenStack Foundation as a Gold Member. OpenStack members at the Gold level pay annual dues of 0.025 percent of their revenue with a minimum of $50,000 per year and a maximum of $200,000 to support the development of the open source cloud platform.

  • OpenStack® Board Elects Tencent as Gold Member of the Foundation
  • Sydney OpenStack Summit - Started
  • OpenStack’s next mission: bridging the gaps between open source projects

    OpenStack, the massive open source project that provides large businesses with the software tools to run their data center infrastructure, is now almost eight years old. While it had its ups and downs, hundreds of enterprises now use it to run their private clouds and there are even over two dozen public clouds that use the project’s tools. Users now include the likes of AT&T, Walmart, eBay, China Railway, GE Healthcare, SAP, Tencent and the Insurance Australia Group, to name just a few.

    “One of the things that’s been happening is that we’re seven years in and the need for turning every type of infrastructure into programmable infrastructure has been proven out. “It’s no longer a debate,” OpenStack COO Mark Collier told me ahead of the projects semi-annual developer conference this week. OpenStack’s own surveys show that the project’s early adopters, who previously only tested it for their clouds, continue to move their production workflows to the platform, too. “We passed the hype phase,” Collier noted.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • FOSDEM 2018 - Distributions Devroom Call for Participation
  • Product pitches aren't on the list of reasons why we attend conferences

    Conferences are on my mind at the moment. Partially, it's because I recently attended the Open Source Summit and Linux Security Summit.

    [...]

    Just to be entirely clear: I really, really hate product pitches. Now, as I pointed out in the preceding paragraph, there's a place for learning about products. But it's absolutely not at an industry conference. But that's what everybody does—even (and this is truly horrible) in keynotes. Now, I really don't mind too much if a session title reads something like "Using Gutamaya's Frobnitz for token ring network termination"—because then I can ignore it if it's not relevant to me. And, frankly, most conference organizers outside company conferences actively discourage that sort of thing, as they know that most people don't come to those types of conferences to hear pitches.

  • Why aren't you an OpenStack mentor yet?

    OpenStack is a huge project composed of dozens of services, each with a different focus, design and specific team of developers. Just to illustrate, if we take Sahara as an example, Sahara is a service that is highly integrated with other services and relies on them to perform its basic features: for authentication it uses Keystone, to store its images it uses Glance, Heat is used for orchestrating instance creation, Neutron is used for networking, and Nova is where the instances creation are actually triggered. As such, getting started in such an environment can be overwhelming, especially for those without much experience. Having the opportunity to have someone to help a new contributor during the beginning of this new experience can help out with a lot of common difficulties, and attract even more new contributors to the community.

  • OpenZFS Developer Summit 2017

    The fifth annual OpenZFS Developer Summit was held October 24-25, 2017 in San Francisco. As with previous years: The goal of the event is to foster cross-community discussions of OpenZFS work and to make progress on some of the projects we have proposed. The first day of the event is presentations, and the second day is combined presentations and a hackathon. New contributors are welcome at the hackathon!

  • Microsoft Adds GCC ARM Cross-Compilation Support To Visual Studio [Ed: Microsoft is piggypacking GCC to promote its proprietary software that adds surveillance to compiled code]
  • GCC 8 Feature Development Is Ending Later This Month

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) will be seeing the last of its features added in the next two weeks for next year's GCC 8 stable release.

    SUSE's Richard Biener announced today that the feature development phase of GCC 8 will be ending on 17 November. After that point, GCC 8 enters "stage three" development meaning only bug fixing and documentation work will be allowed.

  • Europe Gets FLOSS

    Little by little the EU is working towards removing all barriers to adoption of Free/Libre Open Source Software. It works for people. It works for governments. It doesn’t enslave organizations to mindlessly plod on treadmills such as those of M$ and Oracle, continually cranking out revenue and entanglements to the benefit of a mindless corporation.

  • We're switching to a DCO for source code contributions

    We're committed to being good stewards of open source, and part of that commitment means we never stop re-evaluating how we do that. Saying "everyone can contribute" is about removing barriers to contribution. For some of our community, the Contributor License Agreement is a deterrent to contributing to GitLab, so we're changing to a Developer's Certificate of Origin instead.

  • Biomaker Fayre showcases 40 open source, low-cost biological instruments

    There was a real buzz in the air when 40 interdisciplinary teams exhibited their prototypes for the 2017 Biomaker Challenge at the University of Cambridge Department of Engineering.

    Projects covered everything from spectrometers for measuring the colour of penguin guano, microfluidics for tissue culture, to ultrasonic systems for measuring plant height and 3D printed modular microscopes. Each group was given a £1000 grant and four months to turn their big ideas for open source and DIY research tools into reality and over 100 people came along to the final event.

From lab to libre software: how can academic software research become open source?

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Sci/Tech

Academics generate enormous amounts of software, some of which inspires commercial innovations in networking and other areas. But little academic software gets released to the public and even less enters common use. Is some vast "dark matter" being overlooked in the academic community? Would the world benefit from academics turning more of their software into free and open projects?

I asked myself these questions a few months ago when Red Hat, at its opening of a new innovation center in Boston's high-tech Fort Point neighborhood, announced a unique partnership with the goal of tapping academia. Red Hat is joining with Boston-area computer science departments—starting with Boston University—to identify promising software developed in academic projects and to turn it into viable free-software projects. Because all software released by Red Hat is under free licenses, the partnership suggests a new channel by which academic software could find wider use.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Are open source solutions set to take the high ground in the telecoms industry?

    With open source solutions rapidly growing across the telecoms industry, we’re seeing a major shift with the migration from voice and data services to an encompassing set of networking tools. Operators are moving away from traditional hardware and software systems, says Robin Kent, director of European operations, Adax, with open source solutions now viewed as a key enabler of transformation and innovation.

    While open source solutions do have clear advantages, allowing third-party deployment without having to solely manage or develop the software, challenges still remain. For example, if there’s a bug that causes reliability problems or a crash in the network, how long does it take to fix the bug and who’s accountable for it? Until such industry issues are properly addressed, it seems that open source solutions will not be taking the high ground in the industry anytime soon.

  • Beyond Bitcoin: Oracle, IBM Prepare Blockchains for Industrial Use

    There’s been a lot of talk recently about blockchains beyond its original use for supporting Bitcoin. Earlier this year, we covered a session in London where the takeaway from the panel was there are too many problems to be solved. But that was in February, and a lot has changed since then.

    Judging from some of the blockchain sessions at the recent Oracle OpenWorld conference, the emerging potential uses for blockchain are kind of staggering.

  • Looking at November 4th

    There is a communications exercise this weekend that is being held by the United States Department of Defense involving the amateur radio community. That is to say, ham radio operators are doing a drill with the military in the United States. The subject of the drill is a simulation where a simulated Coronal Mass Ejection event causes a simulated nation-wide power grid failure and there is a call-up of stations on an interoperability frequency in the 60 meter frequency band to see who in all the three thousand counties of the United States of America is out there. The lights will not actually go out and there will not be an actual mass of charged particles hurtling towards Earth from our local star's corona that would make a human-created EMP generator's output look miniscule in comparison.

    [...]

    If anything, this will be fun. This is a simulation on a continental scale. Sadly, I don't have any working transmitting gear so I won't be able to fully take part. I will be able to set up the RadioShack DX-398 and listen in, though. Folks without radios at home can utilize the WebSDR (Software Defined Radio) network of receivers perhaps by learning more by pointing their browsers at http://websdr.org/.

  • Embedded Linux Conference Europe videos posted for free streaming

    The Linux Foundation has posted 13 videos of Open Source Summit Europe keynotes and 57 videos of Embedded Linux Conference Europe sessions on YouTube.

    The combined Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) and Open Source Summit Europe event held Oct. 23-25 in Prague, is now available for all to see. The Linux Foundation has posted 70 videos of events on YouTube, including videos of 57 ELCE presentations.

  • Alibaba leads $27m open source database MariaDB’s funding round

    MariaDB’s wallet just got a little thicker with a strong Series C investment round that featured Alibaba as the lead investor.

    The round, which saw the open source database company raise $27m in investment, was led by the Chinese company to the tune of €20 million of the total €22.9 million raised, according to Tech Crunch.

  • MariaDB reports successful investment round led by Alibaba

    MariaDB Corporation announced that it raised $27 million in an investment led by Alibaba Group. Combined with a recent $27 million investment from the European Investment Bank (EIB), this latest capital brings MariaDB’s total funding this year to $54 million. MariaDB will continue its collaboration with Alibaba Cloud, the cloud computing arm of Alibaba Group, to deliver new solutions for the cloud and emerging use cases. MariaDB reaches more than 60 million developers worldwide through its inclusion in every major Linux distribution, as well as a growing presence in the world’s major cloud providers. The latest investments reflect the rising interest in MariaDB from every commercial region around the world.

  • Acquia’s future builds up from open-source foundations
  • NHS Digital wants to beef up information exchange healthcare solutions through open source APIs

    Expressions of interest are invited from suppliers and INTEROPen members to get involved in new API Lab

    NHS Digital has announced plans to develop a new API Lab in Leeds to solve information exchange problems for patients and clinicians.

    The objective is to make patient information and securely accessible to healthcare professionals at the point of need.

    The API Lab will pool the expertise of developers from both industry and NHS Digital to accelerate the development of open source APIs designed to improve system integration across the NHS and social care.

    The Lab will work according to open standards group INTEROPen’s openness and transparency principles to address information exchange problems for patients and clinicians.

  • What are the Most Disliked Programming Languages?

The Microsoft-Connected Black Duck and FOSS 'Tax'

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Microsoft
OSS

‘Tallinn declaration’ commits EU to increase use of open source

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OSS

When building or rebuilding ICT systems, public services should make more use of open source software solutions, the Ministers of the European Union Member States and EFTA countries agreed in Tallinn (Estonia) on 6 October. The recommendation is part of the ‘Tallinn Ministerial Declaration on eGovernment’.

By signing the Ministerial Declaration on eGovernment, the ministers agree that using open source solutions and open standards helps to avoid IT vendor lock-in. They call on public services to make their ICT solutions publicly available, and to encourage the private sector and civil society to reuse the software.

In addition, the ministers call on the Commission “to consider strengthening the requirements for use of open source solutions and standards when (re)building of ICT systems and solutions takes place with EU funding - including by an appropriate open licence policy - by 2020.”

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MariaDB's Support From China

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Server
OSS
  • Open source database startup MariaDB confirms $27M investment led by Alibaba

    Open source database startup MariaDB has announced a new $27 million round of funding led by Alibaba, confirming the news that TechCrunch reported in September.

    As we wrote then, Alibaba contributed the majority of the round, supplying €20 million of the total €22.9 million raised.

  • Alibaba leads $27m round in US-based open source database firm MariaDB

    US and Finland based MariaDB Corporation, which provides an open source database, has raised $27 million in a series C funding led by Alibaba Group.

    The investment will see the company expanding its reach globally as the open source database standard.

  • Alibaba Group leads $27M funding round for MariaDB

    The source of the investment is part of what MariaDB Chief Executive Michael Howard (pictured) called “a funding hat trick” with nearly equal parts of the company’s total cash hoard coming from U.S., European and Asian investors. That reflects a new, more global way of doing business.

FOSS in Science: Harvard, Xiaopeng, Georgia Tech

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OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Making transparency work for Harvard's Dataverse Project

    A culture of transparency permeates the Dataverse project, contributing to its adoption in dozens of research institutions around the world. Headquartered at Harvard University, the Dataverse development team has more than a decade of experience operating as an open source project within an organization that values transparency: the Institute of Quantitative Social Science (IQSS). Working transparently helps the Dataverse team communicate changes to current development efforts, provides opportunities for the community to support each other, and facilitates contribution to the project.

  • Chinese Startup Goes All Out Cloning Tesla Via Open-Source Patents

    Thanks to Tesla’s decision to open-source its patents, Chinese startup Xiaopeng Motors has already manufactured several Model X clones.

  • Open Source Machine Learning Helps the Fight Against Cancer

    Here's an open invitation to steal. It goes out to cancer fighters and tempts them with a new program that predicts cancer drug effectiveness via machine learning and raw genetic data.

    The researchers who built the program at the Georgia Institute of Technology would like cancer fighters to take it for free, or even just swipe parts of their programming code, so they've made it open source. They hope to attract a crowd of researchers who will also share their own cancer and computer expertise and data to improve upon the program and save more lives together.

  • Georgia Tech researchers release open-source AI algorithm to predict effectiveness of cancer drugs

    A team of researchers from Atlanta-based Georgia Institute of Technology introduced an open-source algorithm Oct. 26 that predicts a cancer drug's effectiveness based on a patient's genetic data.

    The researchers developed the machine learning algorithm using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute's panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. Their goal was to create an algorithm that predicts optimal drug therapies based on individual patient tumors.

    In a study of 273 cancer patients, researchers found the algorithm to be about 85 percent accurate in assessing the effectiveness of nine drugs. By releasing the algorithm on an open-source platform, they hope other researchers will participate in refining their work.

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    One of today’s leading tech conferences, the Open Source Monitoring Conference (OSMC), is back to bring together some of the brightest monitoring experts from different parts of the world. The four-day event will be held at Holiday Inn Nuremberg City Conference in Germany starting today, November 21st, until November 24th.
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  • Open education: How students save money by creating open textbooks
    Most people consider a college education the key to future success, but for many students, the cost is insurmountable. The growing open educational resource (OER) movement is attempting to address this problem by providing a high-quality, low-cost alternative to traditional textbooks, while at the same time empowering students and educators in innovative ways. One of the leaders in this movement is Robin DeRosa, a professor at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. I have been enthusiastically following her posts on Twitter and invited her to share her passion for open education with our readers. I am delighted to share our discussion with you.

Android Leftovers

Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks

The ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been enjoying its time on Linux 4.15. In addition to the recent boot time tests and kernel power comparison, here are some raw performance benchmarks looking at the speed from Linux 4.10 through Linux 4.15 Git. With this Broadwell-era Core i7 5600U laptop with 8GB RAM, HD Graphics, and 128GB SATA 3.0 SSD with Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64, the Linux 4.10 through 4.15 Git mainline kernels were benchmarked. Each one was tested "out of the box" and the kernel builds were obtained from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel archive. Read more