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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Udacity open sources its self-driving car simulator for anyone to use

    Self-driving cars require self-driving car software, and Udacity’s helping to feed that need with its nanodegree program in the field. Now, the online education company is also making available its self-driving car simulator via open source license, allowing anyone with a working knowledge of Unity to gab the assets, load its preexisting scenes and create their own tracks for virtual testing.

    If you weren’t already aware, a lot of the ‘education’ of self-driving vehicle software happens in virtual environments, since it’s still relatively expensive to build an actual self-driving test vehicle, and a bit complicated on the regulatory side to find somewhere willing to let you test in real-world conditions – plus you have to prove you can do so with a reasonable expectation of safety. That’s a steep hurdle for tinkerers working independently, and for companies just starting out.

  • Open source vs. COTS: 8 integration considerations

    Nothing is moving faster to the top of IT wish lists than hybrid integration platforms. They offer agencies the ability to use application programming interfaces to integrate on-premises, cloud and mobile applications. However, IT managers face a critical decision when it comes to choosing between an open-source or commercial-off-the-shelf enterprise service bus (ESB) for integration to support that hybrid environment. Below are eight considerations for deciding which digital initiative to implement.

  • 2016 Open Source Yearbook: Print edition now available
  • The benefits of tracking issues publicly

    A public issue tracker is a vital communication tool for an open organization, because there's no better way to be transparent and inclusive than to conduct your work in public channels. So let's explore some best practices for using an issue tracker in an open organization.

    Before we start, though, let's define what we mean by "issue tracker." Simply put, an issue tracker is a shared to-do list. Think of scribbling a quick list of errands to run: buy bread, mail package, drop off library books. As you drive around town, it feels good to cross each item off your list. Now scale that up to the work you have to do in your organization, and add in a healthy dose of software-enabled collaboration. You've got an issue tracker!

  • 4 must-read books for open source career seekers

    Finding a good job can be stressful and finding your dream job even more so. Even in the open source world, with its many opportunities for making a name for yourself by volunteering, it takes effort to make the connection between what you have to offer as a job seeker and what employers are looking for in an employee. One thing that can help set you apart from other applicants is having a solid understanding of yourself and what you bring to the table.

  • The most popular JavaScript front-end tools

    Choosing a development tool based on its popularity isn’t a bad idea. Popular tools are usually more stable, and they often have more resources and community support than less popular tools. Developer satisfaction is another key indicator of a good tool, and for the JavaScript ecosystem, I'm going to show you some significant research on both of these criteria.

    The list that follows contains all of the main tooling categories for a modern JavaScript developer. It includes the most popular tools for each category according to developer popularity and user satisfaction.

  • Netflix Open Sources a Slack Bot for Tracking GitHub Repositories

    Not many organizations have the technology expertise that Netflix has, and it may come as a surprise to some people to learn that the company regularly open sources key, tested and hardened tools that it has used for years. We've reported on Netflix open sourcing a series of interesting "Monkey" cloud tools as part of its "simian army," which it has deployed as a series of satellite utilities orbiting its central cloud platform.

  • Launching an Independent OpenNews Program

    At Mozilla, one of our essential roles is convener: working to identify, connect and support like-minded people who are building a healthier Internet.

    An early — and strong — example of that work is the OpenNews program. Six years ago, Mozilla and Knight Foundation created an initiative to combine open-source practices with journalism. Our aim: strengthen journalism on the open web, and empower newsroom developers, designers and data reporters across the globe.

    The program flourished. Since 2011, OpenNews has placed 33 fellows in 19 newsrooms, from BBC and NPR to La Nacion and the New York Times. It built a global community of more than 1,100 developers and reporters. It spawned the annual SRCCON conference, bolstered newsroom diversity and gave way to innovative newsgathering tools like Tabula. OpenNews has also played a key role in building the annual MozFest in London and Mozilla’s nascent leadership network initiative.

    Mozilla is immensely proud of OpenNews — and immensely grateful to the team behind its success. And today, we’re announcing that OpenNews is spinning out as an independent organization. Going forward, OpenNews — with the support of nonprofit fiscal partner Community Partners — will build on the success it achieved when incubated at Mozilla. OpenNews will continue to play an active role in MozFest and Mozilla’s leadership network.

  • What’s next for open-source Spark?

    A conference focused on a single open source project sounds like the sort of event that will feature a lone keynote speaker speaking to maybe 100 interested parties in a lecture hall at a local college. Spark Summit East was very much the opposite.

    A total of 1,503 people watched the five keynote speakers in a cavernous ballroom at the Hynes Convention Center lay out the future of Spark, the big data processing engine originally developed at the University of California – Berkeley by Matei Zaharia. Spark underlies huge data-driven applications being used by major players like Salesforce, Facebook, IBM and many others, helping organize, analyze, and surface specific grains of sand from beach-sized databases.

  • Cloudera and Intel Team on Accelerating Machine Learning Workloads

    In recent months, countless new machine learning tools have been open sourced, including tools from tech giants such as Google. Both machine learning and AI tools tend to place tough demands on hardware resources, though. With that in mind, Cloudera has announced a jointly tested solution with Intel to advance capabilities for machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) workloads.

Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS

Open source smart home platform gains Ubuntu snap packages

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OSS
Ubuntu

Canonical has released a Snap package mechanism for running Ubuntu apps under the openHAB smart home stack, complete with Azul’s Zulu Embedded Java Runtime.

Canonical’s snap package management mechanism can now run on the open source, Java-driven openHAB home automation framework, enabling easier deployment and secure updating of Ubuntu apps. Last June, Canonical spun off the secure Ubuntu snap format from its container-like Snappy Ubuntu Core IoT distribution, proposing it as an open source, universal package management solution for all Linux distributions. For now, however, it essentially provides an easy, secure way to download, run, and maintain Ubuntu apps packaged under snap.

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Docker 1.13.1 Implements Support for Global Scoped Network Plugins in Swarm Mode

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Server
OSS

Docker released today, February 8, 2017, the first point release of the major Docker 1.13 stable series of the open-source application container engine for Linux-based operating systems, as well as Microsoft Windows and OSX/Darwin.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Hazelcast release Jet, open-source stream processing engine

    Hazelcast are primarily known for their open-source in-memory data grid (usually referred to as Hazelcast IMDG, or just Hazelcast). However, over the last 2 years, they have been working on a major new open-source project, called Hazelcast Jet, and this week have announced a release of this new technology.

  • Keymetrics is a Node.js monitoring tool for your server infrastructure

    French startup Keymetrics just raised $2 million from Alven Capital and Runa Capital to build the best monitoring tool for your Node.js infrastructure. The startup’s founder and CEO Alexandre Strzelewicz also created the popular open source Node.js process manager PM2.

    How do you turn a popular open source project into a successful startup? This question has so many different answers that sometimes it’s hard to find the right one from the first try, and Keymetrics is no exception.

    A few years ago, when Strzelewicz developed PM2 while living in Shanghai, he was just trying to create a better process manager for Node.js because existing solutions were lacking. He didn’t expect that his open source release would take off on Hacker News, attracting contributors working from Google and living in Brazil and Japan.

  • Ranger Joins Many Big Data Projects Graduating at Apache

    Over the past couple of years, we've steadily taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has recently squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Recently, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu had graduated as a Top-Level project. Then, the news came that Apache Geode had graduated from the Apache Incubator as well. It is a very interesting open source in-memory data grid that provides transactional data management for scale-out applications needing low latency response times during high concurrent processing.

  • ACLU Massachusetts Technology for Liberty Director Kade Crockford at LibrePlanet 2017

    Kade Crockford is the Director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the ACLU of Massachusetts. Kade works to protect and expand core First and Fourth Amendment rights and civil liberties in the digital 21st century, focusing on how systems of surveillance and control impact not just society in general but their primary targets — people of color, Muslims, immigrants, and dissidents.

    The Information Age produces conditions facilitating mass communication and democratization, as well as dystopian monitoring and centralized control. The Technology for Liberty Program aims to use the unprecedented access to information and communication to protect and enrich open society and individual rights by implementing basic reforms to ensure new tools do not create inescapable digital cages limiting what people see, hear, think, and do. Towards that end, Kade researches, strategizes, writes, lobbies, and educates the public on issues ranging from the wars on drugs and terror to warrantless electronic surveillance. Kade has written for The Nation, The Guardian, The Boston Globe, WBUR, and many other publications, and regularly appears in local, regional, and national media as an expert on issues related to technology, policing, and surveillance.

  • Understand Your Distributed Apps with the OpenTracing Standard

    Microservices and services-oriented architecture are here to stay, but this kind of distributed system destroys the traditional type of process monitoring. Nonetheless, companies still need to understand just what’s happening inside the flow of an application. Ben Sigelman, Co-founder of LightStep, said at his keynote at CloudNativeCon that by adopting a new standard for distributed applications called OpenTracing can tell those stories without building complex instrumentation, or fundamentally changing the code of your application.

  • Keynote: OpenTracing and Containers: Depth, Breadth, and the Future of Tracing - Ben Sigelman
  • State of Application Delivery Survey Finds the Cloud Driving IT Plans

    How influential has the rise of cloud computing been on the state of application delivery? Hugely influential, according to a new survey of of 2,197 IT executives and technologists on topics including DevOps and security application services and standards.

  • CLARITY project- enhancing take-up of open eGovernment services in Europe

    The CLARITY project is a two year project, funded by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework. Grant Agreement number: 693881. The project will support European Member States in their pursuit for greater trust, transparency and efficiency within their open eGovernment initiatives and highlight best practice within this field.

  • The 7 Elements of an Open Source Management Program: Teams and Tools

    A successful open source management program has seven essential elements that provide a structure around all aspects of open source software. In the previous article, we gave an overview of the strategy and process behind open source management. This time we’ll discuss two more essential elements: staffing on the open source compliance team and the tools they use to automate and audit open source code.

Linux Foundation Projects

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Linux
OSS
  • Open Source MANO Interoperates with 10 NFV Infrastructures

    At NFV Plugtests hosted by ETSI last week, the Open Source MANO (OSM) group tested its code for interoperability with various network function virtualization (NFV) infrastructures and virtual network functions (VNFs).

    Participants at the Plugtests were provided with different combinations of VNFs, NFV infrastructures, and orchestrators, and they were given about an hour-and-a-half to make it all interoperate. OSM’s orchestrator software interoperated successfully with all 10 of the NFV infrastructures and all of the 15 “official” VNFs (5 additional VNFs were considered “test” VNFs).

  • Blockchain: The Invisible Technology That's Changing the World

    Blockchain isn't a household buzzword, like the cloud or the Internet of Things. It's not an in-your-face innovation you can see and touch as easily as a smartphone or a package from Amazon. But when it comes to our digital lives—every digital transaction; exchange of value, goods and services; or private data —blockchain is the answer to a question we've been asking since the dawn of the internet age: How can we collectively trust what happens online?

    Every year we run more of our lives—more core functions of our governments, economies, and societies—on the internet. We do our banking online. We shop online. We log into apps and services that make up our digital selves and send information back and forth. Think of blockchain as a historical fabric underneath recording everything that happens exactly as it occurs. Then the chain stitches that data into encrypted blocks that can never be modified and scatters the pieces across a worldwide network.

Lessons from the rise and fall of an open source project

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OSS

Eight years ago, the CyanogenMod project exploded onto the mobile device software scene. The Android-based open source mobile operating system quickly caught the attention of developers, Android fans and investors, and attracted interest from tech giants including Microsoft and Google. But at the end of last year the project imploded spectacularly. Today the CyanogenMod project is no more, but the arc of its story offers fascinating insight into the world of open source software development.

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Open source users: It’s time for extreme vetting

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Interviews
OSS

Open source software is the norm these days rather than the exception. The code is being written in high volumes and turning up in critical applications. While having this code available can offer big benefits, users also must be wary of issues the code can present and implement proper vetting.

Josh Bressers, cybersecurity strategist at Red Hat, emphasized this point during a recent talk with InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill.

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Do you know where that open source came from?

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OSS

Last year, while speaking at RSA, a reporter asked me about container provenance. This wasn’t the easiest question to answer because there is a lot of nuance around containers and what’s inside them. In response, I asked him if he would eat a sandwich he found on the ground. The look of disgust I got was priceless, but it opened up a great conversation.

Think about it this way: If there was a ham sandwich on the ground that looked mostly OK, would you eat it? You can clearly see it’s a ham sandwich. The dirt all brushed off. You do prefer wheat bread to white. So what’s stopping you? It was on the ground. Unless you’re incredibly hungry and without any resources, you won’t eat that sandwich. You’ll visit the sandwich shop across the street.

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More in Tux Machines

3 little things in Linux 4.10 that will make a big difference

Linux never sleeps. Linus Torvalds is already hard at work pulling together changes for the next version of the kernel (4.11). But with Linux 4.10 now out, three groups of changes are worth paying close attention to because they improve performance and enable feature sets that weren’t possible before on Linux. Here’s a rundown of those changes to 4.10 and what they likely will mean for you, your cloud providers, and your Linux applications. Read more

SODIMM-style module runs Linux on VIA’s 1GHz Cortex-A9 SoC

VIA unveiled an SODIMM-style COM based on its Cortex-A9 WM8850 SoC, with 512MB RAM and 8GB eMMC, plus Ethernet, CSI, graphics, USB, and serial ports. The 68.6 x 43mm “SOM-6X50” computer-on-module appears to be VIA’s second-ever ARM COM. Back in Sept. 2015, the company released a 70 x 70mm Qseven form factor QSM-8Q60 COM, based on a 1GHz NXP DualLite SoC. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya
    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.
  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]
    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.
  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download
    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download
    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.