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OSS

Why Using Open Source Software Helps Companies Stay Flexible and Innovate

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OSS

Companies that use Open Source Software (OSS) find that it offers the most flexibility of any third-party software alternative. You are, for example, never locked into a vendor, their costs, their buying structures, or their re-distribution terms. Open Source enables vendor independence.

In addition, using OSS speeds development, lowers costs, and keeps companies on the cutting edge of technology by facilitating innovation. Open source communities provide a low-cost medium for incubation and testing of new capabilities. While open source ecosystems direct ownership and accountability back to the development teams.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Shaping the Culture of Open Source Companies

    With all of the discussion about source code contributions in open source, sometimes we don’t spend enough time talking about the culture. In her keynote at LinuxCon Europe, Stormy Peters points out that when we say the word "culture," we sometimes think only about diversity or hiring more women, but culture means more than that. Culture is about how we work, how we think, and how we interact with each other.

  • Keynote: The Double Helix of Open Source Software & Companies by Stormy Peters
  • The Promise of Blockchain Is a World Without Middlemen

    The blockchain is a revolution that builds on another technical revolution so old that only the more experienced among us remember it: the invention of the database. First created at IBM in 1970, the importance of these relational databases to our everyday lives today cannot be overstated. Literally every aspect of our civilization is now dependent on this abstraction for storing and retrieving data. And now the blockchain is about to revolutionize databases, which will in turn revolutionize literally every aspect of our civilization.

  • Open Source Linkerd Project Celebrates First Anniversary in Quest to Become the TCP/IP of Microservices

    uoyant, the commercial entity behind the open source Linkerd project, today announced the one year anniversary of the project. Since launching in February 2016 with the mission to make microservices reliable at scale, Linkerd has rapidly gained adoption in the cloud-native community and has served over 100 billion production requests in companies around the world.

  • Hedge Funds Opt for Open Source and AI Goes 'Fintech'

    It makes sense for large technology companies like Google and Microsoft to open source AI and machine learning solutions because they have overlapping vertical interests in providing vast cloud services. These come into play when a certain machine learning library becomes popular and users deploy it on the cloud and so forth. It is less clear why financial services companies, which play a much more directly correlated zero sum game, would open up code that they paid the engineering team to create.

  • SK Telecom CTO Discusses The Future of Software-Defined Networking in the Telco Industry

    As more people access the Internet from their mobile devices, mobile operators must adapt their networks to accommodate skyrocketing data use and new traffic patterns. To do so, they’re turning to the same principles of software-defined networking (SDN) already finding success in the data center.

  • Understanding the Economics of OpenStack

    As anyone involved with managing an OpenStack deployment quickly learns, cost savings and elimination of time-consuming tasks are among the biggest benefits that the cloud platform provides. However, leaders at many OpenStack-focused organizations, including Canonical, believe that the business technology arena is under such tremendous pressure to keep up as Software-as-a-Service, containers, and cloud platforms proliferate, that the true economics of OpenStack are misunderstood. Simply put, a lot of people involved with OpenStack don’t fully understand what they can get out of the platform and the ecosystem of tools surrounding it.

  • Working for a mission, not a boss

    I had a brilliant opportunity to interview Suresh V. Shankar, founder of Crayon, at Slush Singapore 2016. At the conference, he spoke about his experience—and the difficulties he faced—as an entrepreneur. He also talked about how he overcame them.

  • Next version of Joinup in DrupalCamp Transylvania

    The ongoing software development for the next version of Joinup, the European Commission’s digital government collaboration platform, is one of the key presentations at DrupalCamp Transylvania, which takes place from 31 March to 2 April in Tîrgu Mureș (Romania). The talk will focus on the new semantic database storage solution for the next Joinup version.

  • Build a smart garden with these 3 DIY Arduino projects

    With warmer weather around the corner here in the US, it's time for gardeners to start making plans for spring and summer. For the more technically minded among us, it's also a good time to start working on DIY projects that can keep things running smoothly. As it turns out, projects based around the Arduino open hardware development board are an excellent place to start. In this article, I've rounded up three cool Arduino-based projects that take your garden to the next level.

  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.9

    The RVowpalWabbit package update is the third of four upgrades requested by CRAN, following RcppSMC 0.1.5 and RcppGSL 0.3.2.

  • RProtoBuf 0.4.9

    RProtoBuf provides R bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers ("Protobuf") data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol by numerous projects.

German schools turn to open source cloud eLearning

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OSS

Schools and vocational colleges in Cologne, Aachen, Essen and other towns are using open source-based cloud eLearning and collaboration software. The cloud service, Ucloud4schools, is based on the NextCloud open source cloud services solution.

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Albanian open source advocates target elections

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OSS

Free and open source software advocates in Albania are going to ask candidates in the June parliamentary elections about their plans for free software. The campaign will be kicked off by Open Labs later this month. The free software advocacy group will aggregate questions and answers on their campaign website.

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Does your open source project need a president?

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OSS

Recently I was lucky enough to be invited to attend the Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit. The event was stacked with many of the people I consider mentors, friends, and definitely leaders in the various open source and free software communities that I participate in.

I was able to observe the CNCF Technical Oversight Committee meeting while there, and was impressed at the way they worked toward consensus where possible. It reminded me of the OpenStack Technical Committee in its make-up of well-spoken technical individuals who care about their users and stand up for the technical excellence of their foundations' activities.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Tax Your Brain: Open Source Takes on Government Black Box Economics

    Thanks to the Open Source Policy Center, however, the citizens of this great nation may now get a glimpse into the data, and the methods used to derive and analyze that data, that drive public policy and the creation of new laws. In short, this DC-based nonprofit organization seeks to let a little open source sunshine into the black box of government data modeling. Part of the American Enterprise Institute, the OPSC launched in April 2016 with the mission of making public policy analysis transparent, or at least a bit more accessible.

  • Why open source is like a team sport

    As director for Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) — a role she alternatively describes as coach, nerd matchmaker and diplomat — she oversees and provides guidance for all aspects of the project, from technology to community and marketing. At the recent Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit, she headed up a session titled “Open Source as a Team Sport” with and OPNFV’s Chris Price and OpenStack’s Jonathan Bryce.

  • Open Source Solutions for Your Automotive Projects and Prototypes

    The Macchina M2 board was announced on February 21st as the newest addition the Arduino’s AtHeart program, an initiative for companies and organizations to use the Arduino platform for their products. The Macchina M2 allows the user to read their vehicle’s electronic signals and reverse engineer them.

    Embedded systems are now an essential part of the modern car, and the Macchina M2's aim is to allow users to do more than play with the mechanics; the device will let the user get down into the software and electronics. Not only is this sort of access invaluable for tuning and diagnostics, but it opens up a wide range of possibilities for projects or products through customization and prototyping.

    [...]

    AGL is an open-source project which focuses on utilizing the Linux kernel to develop open-source software for automotives. Currently, it can be used for development of in-vehicle-infotainment systems, but there are plans to continue developing it for use with telematics and instrument clusters. The project strives to provide a way for developers, hobbyists, and entrepreneurs to take advantage of onboard electronics and create better software.

  • How to make release notes count
  • Flatpak at SCaLE 15x

    A decade ago I lived on the west side of Los Angeles. One of my favorite conferences was Southern California Linux Expo. Much like Karen, this is the conference where I performed my first technical talk. It’s also where I met and became friends with great people like Jono, Ted, Jeff, the fantastic organizing staff, and so many more.

  • foss-north 2017: Call for Papers

    The Call for Papers for foss-north is open for another week (until the 12th). This gives you an opportunity to speak in front of a great crowd. Looking at the results from last year’s questionnaire, more than 90% are users of open source software and more than 50% are contributors. One thing that surprised me, is that more people actually contribute as a part of their profession than as hobbyists. Looking at the professional vs hobbyist proportions, 45% of the visitors stated that they had their ticket paid by their employer/school, while 42% paid them out of their own pocket.

  • Linux: Is Chrome the fastest web browser?

    Linux offers a great range of choices when it comes to web browsers, there really is a browser out there for everybody. But which Linux browser is the fastest?

  • Firefox 52.0 Released as ESR Branch, Will Receive Security Updates Until 2018

    Back in January, we told you that the development of the Mozilla Firefox 52.0 kicked off with the first Beta release and promised to let users send and open tabs from one device to another, among numerous other improvements and new features.

    Nine Beta builds later, Mozilla has pushed today, March 7, 2016, the final binary and source packages of the Mozilla Firefox 52.0 web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows. The good news is that Firefox 52 is an ESR (Extended Support Release) branch that will be supported until March-April 2018.

  • Mozilla Statement on Immigration Executive Order

    These restrictions are significant and have created a negative impact to Mozilla and our operations, especially as a mission-based organization and global community with international scope and influence over the health of the internet.

  • What If Mesos Metrics Collection Was a Snap?
  • Google’s microservices protocol joins Kubernetes in cloud foundation

    Google’s gRPC protocol was originally developed to speed up data transfer between microservices, proving faster and more efficient than passing around data encoded in JSON.

    Yesterday the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which oversees the development of Kubernetes, announced it would also become the home for gRPC’s development.

  • 'Baby, I know your database needs upgrades tonight'

    And now, here's MongoDB's effort. Yep, that's MongoDB as in the company that ships its wares in less-than-optimally-secured configurations and therefore keeps finding itself at the centre of incidents like enabling the leak of data that kids generate when talking to their Bluetooth teddy bears.

  • EU Catalogue of ICT Standards: draft contents and consultation launched

    The European Commission is happy to launch a public consultation to improve the draft contents of the Catalogue. At this stage, the consultation aims at collecting feedback on the contents, and at receiving advices on possible catalogue structure improvements.

  • ISA² reveals Sharing & Reuse Awards shortlist

    The European Commission has published a list of 17 digital government projects that are shortlisted for its ‘Sharing and Reuse Award’. Of these projects, 8 will win a total of EUR 100,000. The winners will be announced at the Sharing & Reuse Conference in Lisbon (Portugal) on 29 March.

  • City of Malaga shares open data portal extensions

    The city of Malaga (Spain) has announced that it is making available several extensions that it developed for the town’s open data portal, which is based on CKAN. The extensions include one to create a corporate look and feel, a contact-module, and another that makes it easy for the CKAN portal to be federated to Spain’s central open data portal.

  • W3C Completes Bridge between HTML/Micro-fomats and Semantic Web

    The World Wide Web Consortium completed an important link between Semantic Web and microformats communities. With 'Gleaning Resource Descriptions from Dialects of Languages', or GRDDL (pronounced "griddle"), software can automatically extract information from structured Web pages to make it part of the Semantic Web. Those accustomed to expressing structured data with microformats in XHTML can thus increase the value of their existing data by porting it to the Semantic Web, at very low cost.

9 Reasons to Contribute to an Open Source Project

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OSS

More individuals and organizations than ever before are contributing to open source projects. According to the Black Duck 10th Annual Future of Open Source Survey, "65 percent of companies are contributing to open source projects, up from 63 percent in 2015." In addition, 67 percent of enterprises actively encourage their staff to work on open source projects.

Similarly, the most recent report on Who Writes Linux found that 5,062 developers had contributed to the open source operating system in the past 15 months, and since 2005, 13,594 developers have written code for the project.

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UK GDS: ‘Give IT staff time to work on open source’

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OSS

Public administrations that want to maintain open source software solutions should give their IT staff time to work on these and other open source projects, recommends Anna Shipman, the Open Source Lead at the UK’s Government Digital Service (GDS). Developers can then apply patches, look at outstanding issues, or deal with pull requests, all tasks that “don’t necessarily fit in the schedule of work you have for your team”, said Shipman, speaking at the GOTO conference in Berlin last November.

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Greenland’s public records system will be open source

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OSS

Greenland’s next generation public records system is being built as open source. Last autumn, a contract was awarded to Denmark’s Magenta, an open source IT specialist, the company announced in January.

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Collabora's Focus on Advancing the Performance of Open Source Graphics in Linux

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Linux
OSS

Collabora's Mark Filion is informing Softpedia about some of the latest developments the company has been working on to improve graphics support in the open source Mesa 3D Graphics Library, as well as the Wayland and Weston technologies.

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Also: Mesa 17.0.1 Adds Better Support for "The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth," Other Games

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Today in Techrights

Leftovers: OSS

  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?
    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance. In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."
  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide
    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.
  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities
    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos

Security and Bugs

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software
    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.
  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors
    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw. Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors. And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.