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OSS

OSS: Coreboot, Chromium, Firefox, LibreOffice, GRUB, GNU Compiler Collection

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OSS
  • A Cloud/Hosting Provider Is Using Coreboot On Thousands Of Servers

    A European cloud and dedicated server provider that designs their own servers is now designing their own BIOS using Coreboot and using this in production on thousands of servers.

    The Online.net dedicated server provider and their Scaleway cloud division have taken to using Coreboot paired with the Intel FSP and TianoCore and using it on their thousands of servers. Online.net/Scaleway is owned by France's Iliad Group and the company is big enough that they design their own x86/ARM server hardware and have now taken to designing their own BIOS by building off Coreboot.

  • Igalia's Battle Getting Chromium Running Nicely On Wayland

    Igalia has been one of the companies working on improving Chromium's support for Wayland and they shared their story about it at this weekend's FOSDEM 2018 event in Brussels.

    The Igalia consulting firm has been spending a lot of time and resources on improving Chromium's support for Wayland and getting it to parity with the X11 code paths. With their work they have upstream in mind and work to get as much code as possible back upstream in the Google sources.

  • February’s Featured Extensions
  • Firefox users urged to update their browsers immediately due to critical security flaw

    If left unpatched, the critical vulnerability (CVE-2018-5124) could allow remote attackers to execute malicious code on computers which are infected, Cisco's threat team said in its security advisory.

  • Microsoft confirms Office 2019 will be for Windows 10 only

     

    But with online offerings like those from Google and Box and open source alternatives like LibreOffice, which has just released its latest version, Microsoft could be about to learn another lesson in the "you're not the only game in town, lads" department. All these offerings give options at least equal to Microsoft Office and will work across everything from Linux and Mac and even Chrome OS via the web.

  • GRUB 2.04 Should Be Released Later This Year

    It's been nine months since the release of GRUB 2.02 while the GRUB 2.04 stable release should be out by year's end.

    GRUB developer and one of the upstream maintainers Daniel Kiper who works for Oracle provided an update on GRUB2 development at this weekend's FOSDEM event in Brussels.

  • Intel Icelake Support Lands In GCC 8

    Back in November I wrote about a GCC patch for the Intel Icelake CPU target and now that code has finally been merged for the GNU Compiler Collection ahead of the upcoming GCC 8.1 release.

Open Hardware: Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and RISC-V

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Hardware
OSS
  • Raspberry-Pi DVB transmitter: The benefits of open-source hardware

    I was first alerted to the benefits of open-source some years ago while talking to a couple of very experienced engineers. These guys, who worked for a multi-billion-dollar company with a global footprint, had been asked by their manager to complete a project in a ridiculously short time frame.

    They concluded that their only hope was to use open-source, which was an unusual decision for a company of that size and a bit of a culture shock. Open-source software has a long pedigree, of course, but most companies do not open up their hardware designs.

  • AFRL, NextFlex leverage open-source community to create flexible circuit system

    An Air Force Research Laboratory-led project in conjunction with NextFlex, America’s Flexible Hybrid Electronics Institute, has resulted in the first ever, functional samples of flexible Arduino circuit board systems made by using a flexible hybrid electronics manufacturing process, setting the stage for smart technologies for the internet of things (IoT) and sensor applications like wearable devices.

  • Pics from the FOSDEM SiFive talk
  • SiFive unleashed board
  • SiFive Introduces RISC-V Linux-Capable Multicore Processor

    Slowly but surely, RISC-V, the Open Source architecture for everything from microcontrollers to server CPUs is making inroads in the community. Now SiFive, the major company behind putting RISC-V chips into actual silicon, is releasing a chip that’s even more powerful. At FOSDEM this weekend, SiFive announced the release of a Linux-capable Single Board Computer built around the RISC-V ISA. It’s called the HiFive Unleashed, and it’s the first piece of silicon capable or running Linux on a RISC-V core.

OSI @ 20: Latest Coverage

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OSS
  • Open Source's Twentieth Anniversary: And Where the Next Twenty Years Will Take Us

    Open source projects of the first decade were predominantly replacements for off-the-shelf products, while in the second decade they were increasingly components of larger solutions. So what is going to happen in the third decade of open source? To find out we contacted many open source developers and companies that describe themselves as open source and asked them what they think will happen in the next 20 years.

  • Open Source Celebrates 20 Years

    After Christine Peterson came up with "open source software" Todd Anderson, who liked it, used in during a strategy meeting and it was repeated by another attendee. It was at the end of this meeting that terminology was discussed and "open source", which was one of three options suggested by Eric Raymond emerged as the consensus choice. With the formation of Opensource.org, the promotion of the term by Tim O'Reilly who changed the name of the April 1998 "Freeware Summit" to "Open Source Summit" and its use in the official release of Netscape Navigator, the term open source spread very quickly.

  • Open source turns 20 years old, looks to attract normal people

    Tim Burke, veep of Linux infrastructure engineering at Red Hat, told The Register in a phone interview that while he expects proprietary software will continue to exist, particularly with regard to problems not large enough to attract a developer community, open source has become the center of innovation.

    Initially, he said, open source projects represented attempts to reproduce or provide alternatives to popularly proprietary applications and operating systems. OpenOffice, for example, followed in the footsteps of Microsoft Office.

    "Today," Burke said, "open source is leading innovation. We're not cloning anymore."

  • Open Source Software Turns 20-Something

    Saturday marks the 20th Anniversary of open source, sort of.

    Open source led to a new software development and distribution model that offered an alternative to proprietary software. No single event takes the prize for starting the technology revolution. However, Feb. 3, 1998, is one of the more significant dates.

    On that day, Christine Peterson, a futurist and lecturer in the field of nanotechnology, coined the "open source" term at a strategy session in Palo Alto, California, shortly after the release of the Netscape browser source code.

    Later that month, Eric Raymond and Bruce Perens formed the Open Source Initiative, an educational and advocacy organization, to lobby for the open source label. Rapid adoption followed, with support from the Free Software Summit that April.

  • Open Source turns 20: Here's how it all started
  • 'Open source software' turns 20, new Firefox Quantum privacy features, and more news
  • Open source turns 20: How Linux, Raspberry Pi, Chromium and more are influencing PCs

    Open-source software runs something in your life even if you don’t realize it. Raspberry Pi fans take advantage of open-source software. Linux and BSD open-source servers run our websites and corporate networks, as well as in-flight entertainment units and computer kiosks. Open-source software sits at the core of Android phones. Even popular browsers are open-source, including Mozilla’s Firefox, Opera, and the Chromium project, which feeds into the not-so-open-source Chrome browser. Open-source software like Linux is so critical to developers that Microsoft even integrated it into Windows 10 with Bash on Ubuntu on Windows.

  • Happy Anniversary—The Next 20 Years of Open Source Begins Today

    Thirty-five years ago when Richard Stallman decided that he could no longer tolerate proprietary software, and started the free software movement, software freedom was misunderstood and dismissed. Twenty years ago a group of free software advocates gathered in California and decided that software freedom needed to be brought to the business world. The result was a marketing program called “open source”. That same month, February 1998, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) was founded as a general educational and advocacy organization to raise awareness and adoption for the superiority of an open development process.

    It is said, whenever you start a revolution first they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then they join you.

    People did laugh at the idea of free software, they questioned the quality of the software, the feasibility of the development model, and the commitment of the community. English-speaking people only heard the word “free” as in no money, and they laughed at the idea of software being created without cost or payment.

    With the launch of the open source marketing program people fought us. SCO fought very strongly. It tried to kill off Linux. Microsoft tried to kill open source, conspiring in something called the Halloween documents.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • ADLINK Delivers Open-Source DDS Platform
  • Securing the guts of the Gits with GitLab

    GitLab is expanding… but what is its position in the total source code repository management universe?

    Let’s draw a couple of lines first with a nod to the SESYNC research support community for its clarification.

    GitHub open source and free.

  • 5 blockchain statistics: CIO reality check

    A group of healthcare CIOs picked blockchain as the most over-hyped technology trend of the moment.

  • Broadcom Releases Open Source Software Development Kit for Data Center Switches [Ed: SDK is not enough. The underlying platform is proprietary.]

    Broadcom released an open source software development kit (SDK) based on its Tomahawk Ethernet switch silicon.

    The first version of the kit, called SDKLT, will allow developers to customize their use of Tomahawk, the company’s data center top-of-rack and fabric device. However, “this technology could be applied on any current and future Broadcom ASICs,” said Eli Karpilovski, director of marketing, core switch group at Broadcom. “You should expect to see more devices coming up. I expect to see this ecosystem expand.”

  • CoinGeek.com Funds Electron Cash Team to Develop Bitcoin Cash Open Source Projects With nChain
  • “SSH Mastery 2/e” copyedits back
  • Start Your Apollo Collection with an Open Source DSKY

    Given that there have been only six manned moon landings, and that almost all of the hardware that started on the launch pad was discarded along the way, getting your hands on flown hardware is not generally the business of mere mortals. Such artifacts are mostly in museums or in the hands of very rich private collectors. Enthusiasts have to settle for replicas like this open source Apollo Guidance Computer DSKY.

    The DSKY, or Display and Keyboard, was the user interface for the Apollo Guidance Computer, that marvel of 1960s computer engineering that was purpose-built to control the guidance and navigation of the Command and Lunar Excursion modules. [ST-Geotronics] has made a decent replica of the DSKY using 3D-printed parts for the housing and bezel. There’s a custom PCB inside that houses a matrix of Neopixels for the indicator light panel and seven-segment LEDs for the numeric displays. Sadly but understandably, the original electroluminescent display could not be reproduced, but luckily [Fran Blanche] is working on just that project these days. The three-segment displays for the plus and minus signs in the numeric displays proved impossible to source commercially, so the team had to roll their own for that authentic look. With laser cut and engraved overlays for the displays and keycaps, the look is very realistic, and the software even implements a few AGC-like functions.

  • Open-Source IP in Government Electronics

    At the RISC-V conference late last year, one of the keynotes was by Linton Salmon titled A Perspective on the Role of Open-Source IP in Government Electronic Systems. It was not specifically about RISC-V, although the RISC-V ISA and many of the implementations to date (but not all) are open source.

  • PHPUnit 7.0

FOSDEM 2018 (Starts Today) and DevConf 2018

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OSS
  • FOSDEM 2018 Is This Weekend In Brussels

    It's a bit late to make arrangements if you already weren't planning on it, but this weekend is FOSDEM in Brussels. FOSDEM remains one of the best open-source/Linux events in the world.

  • IoT Gadgets at FOSDEM 2018 – Brussels, Belgium
  • DevConf 2018: long live containerization

    DevConf is a yearly conference for developers, administrators, and users of Linux and related technologies. It is organized by Red Hat in Brno, home to one of their major development centers. This event was the 10th in a row and the largest ever. It collects Red Hat stuff from all around the world, so I met old and new Red Hat friends from all over Europe, the US, and even from Australia. Many of the talks focused on containerization, even desktop talks, like those about the Atomic Workstation. One of my favorite talks was about documentation

Open source software: 20 years and counting

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Twenty years later, that campaign has proven wildly successful, beyond the imagination of anyone involved at the time. Today open source software is literally everywhere. It is the foundation for the internet and the web. It powers the computers and mobile devices we all use, as well as the networks they connect to. Without it, cloud computing and the nascent Internet of Things would be impossible to scale and perhaps to create. It has enabled new ways of doing business to be tested and proven, allowing giant corporations like Google and Facebook to start from the top of a mountain others already climbed.

Read more

Also: Open source is 20: How it changed programming and business forever

Events: Open Source Summit, CS3 Workshop, LinuxConfAu

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Linux
OSS
  • Call for Proposals Now Open - Speak at Open Source Summit Japan, North America, Europe

    Open Source Summit Japan, North America and Europe are the leading conferences for developers, architects and other technologists – as well as open source community and industry leaders – to collaborate, share information, learn about the the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for Open Networking Summit North America

    Open Networking Summit (ONS) is the industry's premier open networking event, gathering enterprises, service providers and cloud providers across the ecosystem to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open source networking, including software defined networking (SDN), network functions virtualization (NFV), orchestration and the automation of cloud, network and IoT services.

  • CS3 Workshop 2018 - Global Scale and the future of Federated Cloud Sharing

    At this years CS3 Workshop in Krakow I presented the current state of Nextcloud’s Global Scale architecture. Probably the most interesting part of the talk was the current development in the area of Federated Cloud Sharing, a central component of Global Scale. Originally, Federated Cloud Sharing was developed by Frank Karlitschek and me in 2014 at ownCloud. These day it enables cloud solutions from ownCloud, Pydio and Nextcloud to exchange files.

    As part of Global Scale we will add federated group sharing in the coming months. Further we want to enable apps to provide additional “federated share providers” in order to implement federated calendar sharing, federated contact sharing and more.

  • A division of labor in free software, LinuxConfAu 2018, Sydney, Australia

    FSF campaigns manager Molly de Blanc delivered the talk "A division of labor in free software" in January 2018, at LinuxConfAu 2018. To create this talk, Molly analyzed the results from four community surveys from 2003, 2013, 2016, and 2017 (as well as other bits of data around the internet). With fourteen (incomplete) years of community data, she attempts to quantify the ways the make up of free software has changed, where we're not doing as well as we'd like, and how we can do better.

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12 Great Open Source Website Creation Tools

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OSS

Looking for a free and open source website creation tool? We have created a list of 12 open source CMS that you can use for various kind of websites.
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Top 10 Open Source AI Projects in 2018

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OSS

These days, it's hard to escape the hype surround artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. According to a September 2017 forecast from IDC, worldwide spending on cognitive and AI solutions was around $12.0 billion in 2017. That total is likely to increase at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 50.1 percent through 2021, when the market will hit a whopping $57.6 billion.

In its 2018 predictions, Forrester Research predicted that during this year, "AI will reshape analytic and business innovation" and that "AI will make decisions and provide real-time instructions at 20% of firms." However, it also cautioned that "2018 will be the year that CIOs will realize that new technologies like AI require hard work."

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • LibreOffice 6.0: major update for the free office suite

    LibreOffice is the free power-packed Open Source personal productivity suite for Windows, Macintosh and Linux, that gives you six feature-rich applications for all your document production and data processing needs: Writer, Calc, Impress, Draw, Math and Base. Support and documentation is free from our large, dedicated community of users, contributors and developers. You, too, can also get involved!

  • Migrating from IPF to Packet Filter in Solaris 11.4

     

    This blog entry covers the migration from IPF to Packet Filter (a.k.a. PF).

  • Understanding Software as a Service

    Some others are WordPress, Salesforce, NetSuite and SurveyMonkey. Not all forms of SaaS are necessarily based on a paid subscription model; there are even open-source efforts such as Drupal, which is distributed under the GNU General Public License and can be found in use in over 2% of all of the web sites in the world.

  • Install OpenBSD on dedibox with full-disk encryption

     

    I run several "dedibox" servers at online.net, all powered by OpenBSD. OpenBSD is not officially supported so you have to work-around. Running full-disk encrypted OpenBSD there is a piece of cake. As a bonus, my first steps within a brand new booted machine Wink

  • Our future relationship with FSFE

    Personally, I support an overhaul of FSFE's democratic processes and the bulk of the reasons for this change are quite valid. One of the reasons proposed for the change, the suggestion that the election was a popularity contest, is an argument I don't agree with: the same argument could be used to abolish elections anywhere.

    One point that came up in discussions about the elections is that people don't need to wait for the elections to be considered for GA membership. Matthias Kirschner, our president, has emphasized this to me personally as well, he looks at each new request with an open mind and forwards it to all of the GA for discussion. According to our constitution, anybody can write to the president at any time and request to join the GA. In practice, the president and the existing GA members will probably need to have seen some of your activities in one of the FSFE teams or local groups before accepting you as a member. I want to encourage people to become familiar with the GA membership process and discuss it within their teams and local groups and think about whether you or anybody you know may be a good candidate.

  • Will the Brexit impact EUPL licensors in UK?

     

    This is not the case with the EUPL, which clearly specifies the applicable law in its article 15, first part:

    •     this Licence shall be governed by the law of the European Union Member State where the Licensor has his seat, resides or has his registered office.

    After the Brexit, the United Kingdom will not be considered anymore as “European Union Member State”, so what will be the applicable law?

  • Smart Columbus Initiative Seeks Open-Source Data-Sharing Infrastructure

    The data will be open source — available to anyone online to allow entrepreneurs to look at and analyze the information and spark ideas for applications to make transportation more efficient.

  • A Slide Rule for Real Programmers

    This circular slide rule was used to calculate the most efficient code for the UNIVAC II

  • After industry adopts open video standards, MPEG founder says the end is nigh

     

    Chiariglione says that this also spells the end of real R&D for video, because without the potential for a huge patent-payday, no one will invest in making video playback better.

    In this regard, Chiariglione totally ignores the history of other open formats and systems, which are often better than their proprietary counterparts, for two reasons:  

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Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

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The npm Bug

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    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
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Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more