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OSS

Openwashing and FUD

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OSS

What Open Means to OpenStack

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Server
OSS

In his keynote at OpenStack Summit in Australia, Jonathan Bryce (Executive Director of the OpenStack Foundation) stressed on the meaning of both “Open” and “Stack” in the name of the project and focused on the importance of collaboration within the OpenStack ecosystem.

OpenStack has enjoyed unprecedented success since its early days. It has excited the IT industry about applications at scale and created new ways to consume cloud. The adoption rate of OpenStack and the growth of its community exceeded even the biggest open source project on the planet, Linux. In its short life of 6 years, OpenStack has achieved more than Linux did in a similar time span.

So, why does OpenStack need to redefine the meaning of the project and stress collaboration? Why now?

“We have reached a point where the technology has proven itself,” said Mark Collier, the CTO of the OpenStack Foundation. “You have seen all the massive use case of OpenStack all around the globe.”

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Kubernetes and Kubeflow

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Server
OSS
  • Kubernetes on AWS Leads CNCF Cloud Native Survey

    A survey conducted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation indicates that the deployment of Kubernetes on AWS and other public clouds is on the rise.

  • What Is Kubernetes?

    Kubernetes is one of the hottest technologies in the cloud world today, with organizations big and small talking about the open-source platform. But what exactly is Kubernetes?

  • Kubeflow: Bringing together Kubernetes and machine learning

    Introducing Kubeflow, the new project to make machine learning on Kubernetes easy, portable, and scalable. Kubeflow should be able to run in any environment where Kubernetes runs. Instead of recreating other services, Kubeflow distinguishes itself by spinning up the best solutions for Kubernetes users.

Turi as FOSS

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Development
OSS
  • Fruit of an acquisition: Apple AI software goes open

    Apple's joined other juggernauts of the tech sector by releasing an open source AI framework.

    Turi Create 4.0, which landed at GitHub recently, is a fruit of its 2016 US$200 million acquisition of Turi.

    As the GitHub description explains, it targets app developers that want custom machine learning models but don't have the expertise to “add recommendations, object detection, image classification, image similarity or activity classification” to their apps.

  • Apple Releases Turi ML Software as Open Source

    Apple last week released Turi Create, an open source package that it says will make it easy for mobile app developers to infuse machine learning into their products with just a few lines of code.

    “You don’t have to be a machine learning expert to add recommendations, object detection, image classification, image similarity, or activity classification to your app,” the company says in the GitHub description for Turi Create. “Focus on tasks instead of algorithms.”

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • What is a blockchain smart contract?

    Now, in a blockchain, the important thing is that once the state has changed, you then ensure it's recorded on the blockchain so that it's public and nobody can change or challenge it. But there are other uses for blockchain technology, as I explained in "Is blockchain a security topic?" Permissionless systems, often referred to as distributed ledger technologies (DLTs) are a great fit for non-transactional state models, largely because the sort of people who are interested in them are closed groups of organisations that want to have complex sets of conditions met before they move to the next state. These aren't, by the tightest definition, blockchains. Banks and other financial institutions may be the most obvious examples where DLTs are gaining traction, but they are very useful in supply chain sectors, for instance, where you may have conditions around changing market rates, availability, and shipping times or costs, which may all play into the final price of the commodity or service being provided.

  • Running a successful open source project

    Running an open source project is easy. All you have to do is make your source code available and you’re open source, right? Well, maybe. Ultimately, whether or not an open source project is successful depends on your definition of success. Regardless of your definition, creating an open source project can be a lot of work. If you have goals regarding adoption, for example, then you need to be prepared to invest. While open source software is “free as in beer”, it’s not really free: time and energy are valuable resources and these valuable resources need to be invested in the project.

    So, how do you invest those resources?

  • New package repositories are now enabled by default

    During this year’s coding sprint in Toulouse (which I was able to attend, thanks to being in Europe on a study-abroad program), I spent a lot of time massaging HaikuPorts to generate a consistent-enough state of packages for us to switch to them by default, and then making the in-tree changes necessary for the switch. Thanks to this and mmlr’s comprehensive overhaul of the HaikuPorter Buildmaster over the past couple months, we have finally switched to the new repositories by default as of hrev51620. If you’ve installed a nightly image from after this, you should be able to just pkgman full-sync and upgrade away.

  • Haiku OS Is Very Close To Their Long Awaited Beta, New Repository Working

    The BeOS-inspired Haiku operating system should be issuing its long-awaited beta release by early 2018.

    For months there has been talk of the long-awaited beta for Haiku OS while it looks like roughly within the next month we should be actually seeing this milestone.

  • DeepVariant: Tool to call out variants in sequencing data goes open source

    Megan Molteni, Wired, decoded, at least, the very nature of the challenge to know more about our human puzzle. "Today, a teaspoon of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA. But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over."

    DeepVariant was developed by researchers from the Google Brain team, focused on AI techniques, and Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences.

    It is based on the same neural network for image recognition, but DeepVariant, is now making headlines not for cat IDs but as a way to scan a genetic code for mutations. DeepVariant has gone open source. The GitHub definition of DeepVariant: "an analysis pipeline that uses a deep neural network to call genetic variants from next-generation DNA sequencing data."

  • Open source VPN clients vs VPN provider apps: which is better?

    Power users love open source software for its transparency and flexibility – but what about open source VPN software? Are there any open source VPN clients that can stand up to being compared with the more popular VPN apps from premium providers like ExpressVPN, VyprVPN, IPVanish or NordVPN?

    The short answer is... not really. But the long answer depends a lot on your level of technical know-how, patience, and where you’re willing to place your trust.

  • Coreboot Conference 2017 Videos Now Available

    For those interested in the open-source Coreboot project that serves as a replacement to proprietary UEFI/BIOS, the videos from their European Coreboot Conference are now available.

    The European Coreboot Conference 2017 (ECC'17) was held in Bochum, Germany back at the end of October.

  • Election night hackathon supports civic engagement

    On November 7, 2017, members of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) community came together for the annual Election Night Hackathon held in the Simone Center for Student Innovation. This marked the seventh anniversary of a civic tradition for the FOSS @ MAGIC community, in which students and faculty analyze civic problems in the local community, state, or country and propose a project to address them. MAGIC Center faculty and event organizers are on hand to help students choose open source licenses and publish and share their code.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • How Open Source Databases Unlock Faster Computing
  • The art of the usability interview

    During a usability test, it's important to understand what the tester is thinking. What were they looking for when they couldn't find a button or menu item? During the usability test, I recommend that you try to observe, take notes, capture as much data as you can about what the tester is doing. Only after the tester is finished with a scenario or set of scenarios should you ask questions.

  • This open-source interview approach will help you avoid unconscious bias

    The lack of diversity in tech has been front and center this past year. Large tech companies have publicly vowed to fix the problem. But how? One answer is recognizing, acknowledging, and eliminating unconscious bias from the hiring process.

  • Microsoft Goes All In With Kubernetes
  • OpenBSD Now Officially Supports 64-bit ARM

    OpenBSD has graduated its 64-bit ARM (ARM64) architecture to being officially supported.

    As outlined in the OpenBSD Journal with a change made this week by lead OpenBSD developer Theo de Raadt, OpenBSD's ARM64 support is now considered officially supported.

  • LLVM Clang 6.0 Now Defaults To C++14

    Up to now LLVM's Clang C/C++ compiler has defaulted to using C++98/GNU++98 as its default C++ standard, but fortunately that's no more.

    Clang's default C++ dialect is now GNU++14 version of C++14 rather than GNU++98 (C++98).

    The older versions of the C++ standard remain available and can be set via the -std= argument, just as those previously could have specified C++11 / C++14 / C++17, but now in cases where not specified, GNU++14/C++14 is the default.

  • Tor Browser 7.0.11 is released

    Tor Browser 7.0.11 is now available from the Tor Browser Project page [1] and also from our distribution directory [2].

Shotcut review: This open-source video editor is impressive

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OSS
Reviews

Shotcut is an open-source, free video editing program that has been around for more than a decade. It’s not the most intuitive or professionally presented, but beneath its rough presentation lies a remarkably powerful program.

When you first start Shotcut, you might be surprised at what you don't see—very little of its interface is exposed in the beginning. But click on the buttons in the top bar, and you’ll find numerous views and UI elements that prove to be much more robust than you’d guess at first glance. They’re resizable and undockable, making this one of the most heavily customizable free video editing programs out there.

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WordPress 4.9.1

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OSS
Security
Debian
  • WordPress hit with keylogger, 5,400 sites infected
  • WORDPRESS 4.9.1

    After a much longer than expected break due to moving and the resulting lack of Internet, plus WordPress releasing a package with a non-free file, the Debian package for WordPress 4.9.1 has been uploaded!

    WordPress 4.9 has a number of improvements, especially around the customiser components so that looked pretty slick. The editor for the customiser now has a series of linters what will warn if you write something bad, which is a very good thing! Unfortunately the Javascript linter is jshint which uses a non-free license which that team is attempting to fix.  I have also reported the problem to WordPress upstream to have a look at.

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

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OSS
  • Ionic, one of Madison's top startups, prepares to launch its first commercial product

    They decided early on to open up their code to other developers, in the spirit of the open-source model. Lynch said they looked to other startups, like the document-storage tool MongoDB, as models for creating open-source software as a startup. The idea was that by making it free and open, Ionic Framework would be able to grow its user base more quickly. Lynch added that most other companies making developer toolkits at the time were offering commercial products, so it made sense to offer something free.

  • Practical Ways to Improve Your Open Source Development Impact

    Open source programs are sparking innovation at organizations of all types, and if your program is up and running, you may have arrived at the point where maximizing the impact of your development is essential to continued success. Many open source program managers are now required to demonstrate the ROI of their technology development, and example open source report cards from Facebook and Google track development milestones.

  • Intel Supports open source software for HPC

    OpenHPC is a collaborative, community effort that initiated from a desire to aggregate a number of common ingredients required to deploy and manage High Performance Computing Linux clusters including provisioning tools, resource management, I/O clients, development tools, and a variety of scientific libraries. Packages provided by OpenHPC have been pre-built with HPC integration in mind with a goal to provide re-usable building blocks for the HPC community. Over time, the community also plans to identify and develop abstraction interfaces between key components to further enhance modularity and interchangeability. The community includes representation from a variety of sources including software vendors, equipment manufacturers, research institutions, supercomputing sites, and others. This community works to integrate a multitude of components that are commonly used in HPC systems, and are freely available for open source distribution. We are grateful for the efforts undertaken by the developers and maintainers of these upstream communities that provide key components used in HPC around the world today, and for which this OpenHPC community works to integrate and validate as a cohesive software stack.

  • Overcoming challenges when building great global communities

    Today's open source communities include people from all around the world. What challenges can you expect when establishing an online community, and how can you help overcome them?

    People contributing to an open source community share a commitment to the software they’re helping to develop. In the past, people communicated by meeting in person at a set place and time, or through letters or phone calls. Today, technology has fostered growth of online communities—people can simply pop into a chat room or messaging channel and start working together. You might work with someone in Morocco in the morning, for example, and with someone in Hawaii that evening.

  • Google's DeepVariant Deep-Learning Technology Goes Open-Source
  • Mozilla Awards Research Grants to Fund Top Research Projects

    We are happy to announce the results of the Mozilla Research Grant program for the second half of 2017. This was a competitive process, with over 70 applicants. After three rounds of judging, we selected a total of fourteen proposals, ranging from building tools to support open web platform projects like Rust and WebAssembly to designing digital assistants for low- and middle- income families and exploring decentralized web projects in the Orkney Islands. All these projects support Mozilla’s mission to make the Internet safer, more empowering, and more accessible.

  • Quest: crossing the DevOps database chasm

    In order to embrace open source, DBAs need the tools at hand to ensure they do not become overwhelmed.

  • Facebook, Google, Red Hat, IBM revisit open source licencing

    Four of the largest players in the open source arena – Facebook, Google, Red Hat and IBM – have joined forces to promote predictability in open source licensing, by committing to extend additional rights to rectify open source licence compliance errors.

    Michael Cunningham, Red Hat's executive vice president and general counsel, said this was in line with the four organisations' belief in promoting greater fairness and predictability in licence enforcement and the growth of participation in the open source community.

    According to Cunningham, Red Hat believes that enforcement of open source software licences should be judged by whether the activity fosters or discourages adoption of the software and collaboration and participation in open source development.

  • Open-source design can democratise healthcare, says Sabine Wildevuur

    "Normally, you make something, you close it down, and you sell it. Open design, on the other hand, is all about sharing your knowledge of design with others," she says.

  • Mozilla's new voice recognition model, fixing the GPL, and more news

    In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we look at Mozilla's new speech recognition model, how big players in open source are moving to help the GPL, and more.

  •  

  • Open Source Biolab Uses 3D Bioprinting Platform to Fabricate Complex Earlobe Vasculature

    3D printing technology has made a big impact in the medical field, in more ways than one, including bioprinting and biofabrication. The Institute for Development of Advanced Applied Systems, or Institute IRNAS, located in Slovenia, operates Symbiolab, an open source-based biolab that focuses on the development of future-proof 3D biofabrication. The lab works on innovative biomaterials research, and also develops biomedical research applications and hardware solutions, including its Vitaprint 3D bioprinting platform. The open source Vitaprint was developed in-house at Symbiolab, and the platform includes demo files, protocols, and hardware.

  • Open source suicide: This 3D-printable ‘death pod’ provides painless euthanasia

    Dr. Philip Nitschke is concerned about a different aspect, though. He is one of the most outspoken proponents of euthanasia, referring to deliberate intervention taken by a person to end his or her life to relieve suffering. And as the founder and director of the pro-euthanasia group Exit International, he is using tech to help his cause. Working alongside Netherlands engineer Alexander Bannick, Nitschke developed a 3D-printed euthanasia machine called Sarco which, he claims, could serve a valuable social purpose.

    [...]

    There will no doubt be plenty of controversy about the creation of Sarco, just as there is around the wider topic of euthanasia. But it’s definitely an example of open-source 3D-printing models we’ve not considered before.

  • New Antitrust Division Chief Prioritizes Regulation of Standard Setting Organizations

    As we discussed in our May 2017 article, the current head of the DOJ’s Antitrust Division, Makan Delrahim, brings considerable intellectual property experience to the division. Delrahim started his legal career at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative as deputy director for intellectual property rights. He later served on the Intellectual Property Task Force while serving a stint at the DOJ in the early 2000s. Then-acting Antitrust Division Chief R. Hewitt Pate referred to Delrahim as a “patent lawyer.” Therefore, it is not surprising that, in a Nov. 10 maiden speech at the University of California’s Transactional Law and Business Conference, Delrahim chose to discuss antitrust violations in IP licensing, specifically urging federal and state antitrust enforcement agencies to prioritize review of standard setting organizations (SSOs).

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More in Tux Machines

Command Line Heroes Launched

  • Red Hat launches new podcast series, Command Line Heroes
    Technology has become so integrated into our daily lives that it can be easy to take it for granted. But we’ve only gotten to where we are today because of the command line heroes that shaped the industry - and continue to do so. Command line hero. What does that really mean? To us it’s the developers, programmers, hackers, geeks and open source rebels - the people who are on the front line, transforming technology from the command line up. The biggest technology advancements and innovations didn’t happen by accident. They were made possible through the passion, creativity and persistence of technologists around the world.
  • Command Line Heroes
    I’ve been looking forward to this for quite a while, ever since it was announced: today, the first two episodes of Command Line Heroes were published. Command Line Heroes, or CLH for short, is a series of podcasts that tells the stories of open source. It’s hosted by Saron Yitbarek, of CodeNewbie fame, and sponsored by Red Hat.

NethServer, Red Hat, and Fedora

  • Why building a community is worth the extra effort
    Building the NethServer community was risky. But we've learned so much about the power of working with passionate people.
  • Risk Malaise Alert in Option Market: Red Hat Inc Implied Price Swing Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Red Hat (NYSE:RHT) Receives “Neutral” Rating from Credit Suisse Group
  • Sit Investment Associates Inc. Takes $1.22 Million Position in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Fixing flatpak startup times
    A lot of people have noticed that flatpak apps sometimes start very slowly. Upon closer inspection you notice this only happens the first time you run the application. Still, it gives a very poor first time impression. So, what is causing this, and can we fix it? The short answer to this is font-cache generation, and yes, I landed a fix today. For the longer version we have to take a detour into how flatpak and fontconfig works.
  • Fedora 28 wallpaper contest now open -- submit your image to the Linux distro!
    One of the first things I do after installing a new Linux distribution is set a different wallpaper. Why? Desktop pictures really inspire me -- my mood can be positively altered by a beautiful image. The default wallpaper is often boring. For the most part, I prefer images of nature with bright colors. After all, if I am stuck indoors working on my computer, a wallpaper of the beach, mountains, or a colorful bird, for instance, can transport me to the outdoors -- in my mind. Sadly, not every distro has beautiful high-quality images. Fedora, however, often does -- thanks to its "supplemental" wallpapers. What is particularly cool  about that operating system, is that it regularly accepts wallpaper submissions from the community as part of a contest. In other words, anybody can potentially contribute to a new version of the distro by simply uploading a photo, drawing, or other picture. Fedora 28 is the upcoming version of the OS, and the developers are now calling for wallpaper submissions for it. Will you submit an entry to the contest?

OSS Leftovers

  • Google's Kelsey Hightower talks Kubernetes and community
    Google developer advocate Kelsey Hightower says that he always figured that the (now wildly successful) Kubernetes container orchestration platform "would get big on its own at some point." He shared some of the reasons he sees for Kubernetes' success in a podcast recorded in December at CloudNativeCon in Austin. The first is that Kubernetes is an effective platform on which to do other things. It provides "better primitives than I had before" as Hightower puts it. At the same time, he says that this is something people misunderstand about Kubernetes. "It's not the end game," he says. Rather, at some point, it increasingly becomes "the new platform for building other platforms."
  • A FOSS Year Resolution
    It’s that time of year again. The time when some people are taking a long hard look at their lives and trying to decide what they want to change about themselves over the course of the next year. Some of us want to lose weight, or exercise more, or spend more time with our kids. The trouble is only about 9% of these resolutions actually happen.
  • Do not limit yourself
    The motto of Learn yourself, teach others is still very strong among us. We try to break any such stupid limits others try to force on our lives. We dream, we try to enjoying talking about that book someone just finished. We discuss about our favorite food. I will end this post saying one thing again. Do not bound yourself in some non existing limits. Always remember, What a great teacher, failure is (I hope I quoted Master Yoda properly). Not everything we will try in life will be a super successful thing, but we can always try to learn from those incidents. You don’t have to bow down in front of anyone, you can do things you love in your life without asking for others’ permissions.
  • Benjamin Mako Hill: OpenSym 2017 Program Postmortem
    The International Symposium on Open Collaboration (OpenSym, formerly WikiSym) is the premier academic venue exclusively focused on scholarly research into open collaboration. OpenSym is an ACM conference which means that, like conferences in computer science, it’s really more like a journal that gets published once a year than it is like most social science conferences. The “journal”, in iithis case, is called the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Open Collaboration and it consists of final copies of papers which are typically also presented at the conference. Like journal articles, papers that are published in the proceedings are not typically published elsewhere.
  • NVDA and Firefox 58 – The team is regaining strength
    A week before the Firefox 57 “Quantum” release in November, I published an Article detailing some bits to be aware of when using Firefox and the NVDA screen reader together. In Firefox 58, due on January 23, 2018, the reliable team is regaining strength in playing well together and offering you good and fast web accessibility. After the Firefox 57 release, due to many changes under the hood, NVDA and Firefox temporarily lapsed in performance. Statistics quickly showed that about two thirds of the NVDA user base stayed with us despite of this. So to all of you who stuck with us on this difficult release: Thank you! Many of the others moved to the extended support release of Firefox 52. Thank you to those of you as well, you decided to stick with Firefox! Also, statistics show that barely any of those of you who stuck with 57 decided to turn off multi-process Firefox, but instead used the new technology, and some of you even reported problems to us.
  • Retpoline-enabled GCC
    There will be upstream backports at least to GCC 7, but probably pretty far back (I've seen people talk about all the way to 4.3). So you won't have to run my crappy home-grown build for very long—it's a temporary measure. :-) Oh, and it made Stockfish 3% faster than with GCC 6.3! Hooray.
  • Payara Services to Embed Secure, Stable Open Source Java Runtime from Azul SystemsPayara Server 2018 Update Includes Azul Zulu Enterprise Builds of OpenJDK
  • Eclipse Che – A Next-Generation Cloud IDE and Workspace Server
    We have a couple of posts on developer workspaces and cloud IDEs but in my opinion, none of them has the combined features of beauty, flexibility, and efficiency while being free. That is why it is with great pleasure that I introduce to you the (arguably) best cloud-based IDE you will ever need, Eclipse Che. Eclipse Che is a beautiful and customizable open-source developer workspace and cloud Integrated Development Environment.

Security: Hospital With Windows, Reproducible Builds, Intel, Transmission and More

  • Hospital [sic] sent offline as hackers infect systems with ransomware, demand payment [iophk: "Windows"]
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #142
  • Spectre and Meltdown patches causing trouble as realistic attacks get closer
    Applications, operating systems, and firmware all need to be updated to defeat Meltdown and protect against Spectre, two attacks that exploit features of high-performance processors to leak information and undermine system security. The computing industry has been scrambling to respond after news of the problem broke early a few days into the new year. But that patching is proving problematic. The Meltdown protection is revealing bugs or otherwise undesirable behavior in various drivers, and Intel is currently recommending that people cease installing a microcode update it issued to help tackle the Spectre problem. This comes as researchers are digging into the papers describing the issues and getting closer to weaponizing the research to turn it into a practical attack. With the bad guys sure to be doing the same, real-world attacks using this research are sure to follow soon.
  • Finnish firm detects new Intel security flaw
    new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday. F-Secure said in a statement that the flaw had nothing to do with the "Spectre" and "Meltdown" vulnerabilities recently found in the micro-chips that are used in almost all computers, tablets and smartphones today. Rather, it was an issue within Intel Active Management Technology (AMT), "which is commonly found in most corporate laptops, (and) allows an attacker to take complete control over a user's device in a matter of seconds," the cybersecurity firm said.
  • What is RubyMiner? New malware found targeting Windows and Linux servers to mine cryptocurrency
  • BitTorrent flaw could let hackers take control of Windows, Linux PCs
    According to Project Zero, the client is vulnerable to a DNS re-binding attack that effectively tricks the PC into accepting requests via port 9091 from malicious websites that it would (and should) ordinarily ignore.
  • BitTorrent critical flaw allows hackers to remotely control users' computers
    A critical flaw in the popular Transmission BitTorrent app could allow hackers to remotely control users' computers. The flaw, uncovered by Google Project Zero security researchers, allows websites to execute malicious code on users' devices. Researchers also warned that BitTorrent clients could be susceptible to attacks as well if the flaw is leveraged.