Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Free Software and Open Access

Filed under
OSS
  • Coinbase’s GDAX announces open source library of cryptocurrency trading tools

    San Francisco-based Coinbase has announced that its professional based exchange Global Digital Asset Exchange (GDAX) has introduced the ‘GDAX Trading Toolkit (GTT)’ an open source library for trading digital currency across a variety of exchanges.

    The GTT provides a suite of tools for traders to design, create, and operate trading features such as automated trading bots and personal portfolio trackers.

  • The Washington Post starts using Talk, an open-source tool for improving online comments

    An open-source tool called Talk is being rolled out on The Washington Post website starting today (6 September), to help reimagine the online commenting experience for both the newsroom and readers.

    The tool is developed by The Coral Project, a joint initiative from Mozilla, Washington Post and The New York Times, initially supported by the Knight Foundation and funded by the Democracy Fund, the Rita Allen Foundation, and Mozilla.

    Talk is currently live on three sections on washingtonpost.com – business, politics and The Switch blog. Over the coming weeks, it will become more widely available on The Washington Post, and other organisations such as Fairfax Media titles in Australia will start using it.

    The tool, which launched in beta in March and is currently on its third version, can be installed by any newsroom using the available documentation, and more features are being added regularly.

  • European Libraries’ Five Principles For Open Access Negotiations With Publishers

    European research libraries have issued five principles for libraries to use when holding open access negotiations with publishers, seeking to prevent over-charging and promote transparency and sustainable access.

  • Open educational resources can offer relief from high textbook prices

    Timbo X. Spartan is your typical MSU student. He goes to Economics 201 and Spanish 202 on Monday and Wednesday, and ISS 215 and Accounting 201 on Tuesday and Thursday.

    According to the Student Book Store's current listings, the required texts for these courses would have our friend Timbo spending $100 on economics, $88 on Spanish, $160 on the ISS course and $187 on accounting. This adds up to $535 in materials for one semester.

    Of course, this is all hypothetical, but not unrealistic. Chemical engineering sophomore Megan Richardson has spent more than $400 on materials for classes this semester and isn't finished shopping yet.

    "Last year I spent close to $300 on one chemistry textbook," Richardson said. "This is on the higher end of what I've spent so far, but yeah. It's kind of ridiculous."

Servers: MAAS, Logging, and Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) Open OnDemand 1.0

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • MAAS Development Update – Aug 21st – Set 1st
  • A checklist for building your enterprise logging layer

    In any discussion about big-picture topics such as cloud migration services, data centers, and microservices, the topic of enterprise logging can get relegated to an afterthought. But you do so at your peril, because without logging, you won't have critical visibility into your services in order to diagnose and debug efficiently. What's more, if you're a large enterprise, you may be violating compliance requirements.

  • Ohio Supercomputer Center releases open-source HPC access portal

    An innovative web-based portal for accessing high performance computing services has matured beyond the beta phase and now is available to HPC centers worldwide.

    The Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) has launched Open OnDemand 1.0, an open-source version of OSC OnDemand, the Center's online, single-point-of-entry application for HPC services.

    Open OnDemand is an NSF-funded project to develop a widely shareable web portal that provides HPC centers with advanced web and graphical interface capabilities. Through OnDemand, HPC clients can upload and download files, create, edit, submit and monitor jobs, run GUI applications and connect via SSH, all via a web browser, with no client software to install and configure.

Chrome 61 Released, Mozilla Firefox Bugfix for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • New in Chrome 61
  • Chrome 61 Brings WebUSB, JavaScript Modules & More
  • Chrome 61 Enters Stable Channel, Now Rolling Out For Windows, Mac and Linux

    Chrome 61 has finally entered the stable channel with a slew of developer-focused features and general security fixes. The desktop version for Chrome 61 has started rolling out today, available for Mac, Windows, and Linux. It brings the latest WebUSB API, which enables web apps to interact with computer peripherals like keyboards, mice and printers.

  • Google Chrome 61 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    Today Google launched version 61 of the Chrome browser for Windows, Mac, and Linux. With this release, we have 21 security updates, numerous improvements and bug fixes, and three APIs that allow developers to further enhance their sites and apps.

  • Mozilla Firefox Finally Fixes An Awkward, 11 Year Old Linux Bug

    It's taken more than a decade, but after enough user complaints, there is finally a patch queued for Firefox 57 to fix an arguably annoying default behavior of Firefox on Linux/Unix systems.

    The default setting on Firefox has long been when the middle mouse button is clicked to open an URL based upon the contents of the clipboard. Most users don't expect this behavior by default and many have found it to be incredibly awkward accidentally opening a new tab with some web-page based upon what's in your copy-paste clipboard.

OSS: TensorFlow, Penn, Voting in San Francisco, ReText, Linux Mint 18.3 Backup Tool

Filed under
OSS
  • TensorFlow brings machine learning to the masses

    You might think that adopting deep learning or machine learning (ML) techniques means hiring a fleet of cutting edge data scientists with PhDs, but this simply is not true. Creating new deep learning models and theories is hard, but using the existing, popular deep learning models is not rocket science. In fact, a typical IT engineer can learn the basics of ML, including how to integrate and use the well-known ML and deep learning algorithms and techniques, to build an ML solution. In short, a company’s IT engineers can be trained to become ML engineers.

  • Jacquelyn Sussman | Didn't read the PRP? Penn didn't either

    The Objectivist | Why Penn needs to seriously consider open-sourcing

    [...]

    Take GitHub as an example: According to the GitHub blog and GrowthHackers, the open-source code repository was founded in 2008 and rose from a $750 million valuation in 2012 to a $2 billion valuation as of 2015 due to its increase in revenues and large user base. Its customers include tech giants Amazon, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, all of which rely on this free and public repository to quickly and easily share code and other information.

  • San Francisco May Use Open Source Voting System

    The city of San Francisco’s local government may be the first one to use an open source voting system. If the city manages to complete the process successfully, it will be the first place in the country to use open source voting. It is something that has been considered by many people for years but recently $300,000 has been set aside to study the possibility.

    Elections Director John Arntz has opened discussions with the consulting group Slalom which will create a report about open source voting. It is expected to be completed by January. It is slated to cost $175,000 and focus on what San Francisco might encounter if it chooses to go through with such a system.

  • San Francisco investigates open source voting system
  • Why open source success is increasingly dependent on corporate cash [Ed: Mac Asay puts money before freedom; Because he doesn't grasp the goals of FOSS (not market share)]
  • ReText: Another Great Markdown and reStructuredText Editor for Linux

    ReText is a simple and powerful editor for Markup languages (such as reStructuredText and Markdown), it is written in Python programming language. It is basically compiled for Linux and other POSIX compatible platforms, theoretically it can work on other operating systems as well but you have to port it by yourself. Since it is in active development you can submit bugs if find at any point.
    You can control its output formatting. The files it works with are plain text files, however it can export to PDF, HTML and other formats.

  • Linux Mint Brings Big Improvements to its Backup Tool

    An improved backup tool will debut in Linux Mint 18.3. The updated utility will be easier to use, feature performance improvements, and more.

OSS: OpenProject in OSI, FOSS Events, and Women in Technology/Computing

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • OpenProject Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the founding organization of the open source software movement, announced that the OpenProject Foundation has joined the global non-profit as an Affiliate Member. OpenProject joins a who's who of global open source projects and foundations in support of software freedom, including Drupal Association, Eclipse Foundation, Linux Foundation, Mozilla Foundation, Wordpress Foundation, Wikimedia, and many more. The OSI Affiliate Member Program allows any non-profit community, organization or institution—unequivocally independent groups with a clear commitment to open source—to join the OSI in support of its mission to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and to build bridges among different constituencies in the open source community.

  • Randa Approaches

    Later this week, I’m leaving for Zurich, and from there I’ll take the train up to Randa (up, in the sense that I live at sea level, and Randa is the length of one million micro-SD cards laid end-to-end higher).

    In Randa, I’ll be working as a KDE developer, and as a Calamares developer, and learning about accessibility tooling. There’s about 60 hacking hours in that week. I’ll also be working as the cook, for one day. There’s about 12 cooking hours in a day, since feeding 30 people takes a lot of vegetable-chopping, bread-slicing, and dish-washing.

  • FOSScamp Syros 2017 – day 2

    The morning stated by taking the bus to Kini beach. After some to enjoy the water (which were still cold in the morning), we sat for talking about the local Debian community and how can we help it grow. The main topic was localization (l10n), but we soon started to check other options. I reminded them that l10n isn’t only translation and we also talked about dictionaries for spell checking, fonts and local software which might be relevant (e.g. hdate for the Jewish/Hebrew calendar or Jcal for the Jalali calendar). For example it seems that regular Latin fonts are missing two Albanian characters.

    We also talked about how to use Open Labs to better work together with two hats – member of the local FOSS community and also as members of various open source projects (not forgetting open content / data ones projects as well). So people can cooperate both on the local level, the international level or to mix (using the other’s project international resources). In short: connections, connections, connections.

  • GnuPG Financial Results for 2016
  • ‘Women Were in Fact Pioneers in Computing Work’

    When a white male Google employee was fired after the release of a memo in which he complained about efforts to increase gender or racial diversity because employment gaps in tech may be due in part to “biological differences” which are “universal across human culture”—woman like feelings more than ideas, that sort of thing—this is not indication that, as USA Today hyperventilated, “the hot button issue of gender bias in the workplace has just gone thermonuclear.” It did provide occasion for the airing of some old ideas involving sexism and scientism, presented as somehow new, because technology.

  • a new interview question

    Obviously if you discover a person that thinks that gender imbalance is just the way it is and that nothing can or should be done about it, or that women don't program well, or the like, then that's a great result: clear no-hire. This person is likely to make life unpleasant for their female colleagues, and your company just avoided the problem. High fives, interview team!

Openwashing and FUD: Univa, Open Source Geospatial Foundation, Atos, Facebook, and Black Duck

Filed under
OSS
  • Univa Open Sources Universal Resource Broker for Kubernetes [Ed: Could go a step further and liberate more than just a single component]

    Today Univa announced the open source availability of the Universal Resource Broker (URB) adapter for Kubernetes. This new URB adapter will be of interest for organizations running Apache Mesos frameworks that are looking to deploy Kubernetes and Mesos workloads on a common infrastructure. The release of the URB adapter for Kubernetes marks a significant open source contribution by Univa and demonstrates its commitment to the Kubernetes community and to helping users get the most from their infrastructure investments.

  • Tapping technology to collect data on biodiversity

    The concept behind such workshops is to empower citizens in the use of open source software, which is freely available and can be downloaded to collate macro-level data. S. Narendra Prasad from Open Source Geospatial Foundation-India said such workshops aimed at imparting knowledge to residents and the student community on recording data pertaining to biodiversity.

  • Atos launches world's first Open Source high-performance data warehouse for Amazon Web Services

    Powered by Pivotal Greenplum, the new massively parallel clustered data warehouse features unique machine learning, text and natural language analytic together with geospatial location queries and windowing functions. It allows users to build and test an Open Source analytics cluster directly from zData's Website without any limitations, to enable powerful and rapid Big Data analytics on petabyte scale data volumes, taking advantage of the Atos Codex expertise.

  • Facebook demystifies smartphone AI with open source building blocks
  • Is Open Source More Risky? [Ed: Anti-FOSS Microsoft 'proxy' Black Duck creeps into another FUD piece about FOSS security/licensing ; Black Duck was, by its own admission, created to attack the adoption of GPL-type licences.]
  • Don't believe the hype, AGPL open source licensing is toxic and unpopular [Ed: Black Duck again]

OSS/Sharing: Reddit, OECD, WikiFundi, Havenlabs

Filed under
OSS
  • Reddit is killing off access to its main source code
  • Reddit’s Main Source Code Is No Longer Open Source — Here’s Why
  • OECD examines open government strategies

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is surveying the open government strategies in countries across the globe. The goal is to create a common approach to open government - a toolkit for the design and implementation of successful open government programmes.

    The OECD is asking for public input on its draft recommendations. It has published an online survey. Deadline for participation is 10 September.

  • How WikiFundi is helping people in Africa contribute to Wikipedia

    In developed countries, the ability to access and edit Wikipedia easily is taken for granted, but in many African countries, where access to reliable electricity and broadband are limited, that's not the case. I recently interviewed Florence Devouard, who is working on several open source projects to help close gaps caused by poor access to online information. She is co-leader of the WikiFundi project, as well as other projects related to Wikipedia and Africa, including Wiki Loves Women, a women's information initiative, and Wiki Loves Africa, a media contest that invites the public to contribute photographs, videos, and audio to Wikipedia. All projects are part of the WikiAfrica movement.

    Florence brings to these projects her 15 years of experience in project management, online communities, and knowledge sharing, as well as a passion that is palpable and drives her vision to empower people (and particularly women) in Africa with information.

  • Havenlabs releases open-source Utility Band to help amputees

    New York-based not-for-profit Havenlabs has announced the release of its Utility Band assistive device. The open-source 3D printed device currently has two different preset attachments that amputees can use to hold tools, with more yet to be announced.

  • Inside the Massive 711 Million Record Onliner Spambot Dump

    Last week I was contacted by someone alerting me to the presence of a spam list. A big one. That's a bit of a relative term though because whilst I've loaded "big" spam lists into Have I been pwned (HIBP) before, the largest to date has been a mere 393m records and belonged to River City Media. The one I'm writing about today is 711m records which makes it the largest single set of data I've ever loaded into HIBP. Just for a sense of scale, that's almost one address for every single man, woman and child in all of Europe. This blog posts explains everything I know about it.

OSS: What’s The Deal With Open Source, Facebook, and Reddit

Filed under
OSS
  • Ask LH: What’s The Deal With Open Source?

    People also often see open source endeavours as being run by a few unkempt coders in their parents' basements on a budget of nothing, updating when they get a chance (if ever). While many open source projects are run by less than a handful of contributors, larger open source systems like the Mozilla Foundation and the several Linux distributions clearly show that the system can work on a large-scale as well. In these cases, greater understanding of the underlying code can lead to more customisations and further development without actually requiring more money.

    Open source isn't necessarily right for every piece of software out there, but we do love open source. It can provide (and has provided) the world with some excellent software that anyone who knows what she's doing can change to suit her desires. In the end, the software isn't necessarily better or worse, but just different from a point of view that most users will never see.

  • Facebook promised to open up its log storage system

    Sysadmins struggling to manage lots of logs may want to Like a new "friend", after Facebook last week decided to share its distributed log management system.

    If you're just running one site, Zuck's "LogDevice" code might not be for you: it's how Facebook makes sense of its 10 data centres, including how The Social Network™ brings those logs back into sync when something goes wrong.

    Perhaps the most impressive number is in that operation: Facebook claims that after a failure, LogDevice can rebuild logs to “fully restore the replication factor of all records affected” at between 5 Gbps and 10 Gbps per second.

  • What does /r/linux feels about Reddit no longer being open source?

San Francisco could become first local government to use open-source voting system

Filed under
OSS

San Francisco has taken a tentative step toward deciding on whether it will become the first local government in the country to run its voting machines on open-source software.

The notion of shifting away from using proprietary technology sold by private companies to computer code made freely available for anyone to use and modify has been talked about for years. But it’s been getting more attention since the city allocated $300,000 to study the issue.

Last week, Elections Director John Arntz opened discussions with Slalom, a consulting group selected by the city to prepare a detailed report on what San Francisco would face if it decides go to an open-source voting system. The report is expected to be finished by January at a cost of around $175,000.

Read more

Also: Reddit turns off access to its main source code

A Comparison of Linux Container Images

Filed under
Server
OSS

Going back to basics, there are two major parts of an operating system – the kernel and the user space. The kernel is a special program executed directly on the hardware or virtual machine – it controls access to resources and schedules process. The other major part is the user space – this is the set of files, including libraries, interpreters, and programs that you see when you log into a server and list the contents of a directory such as /usr or /lib.

Linux containers essentially break the two pieces of an operating system up even further allowing the two pieces to be managed independently – the container host and the container image. The container host is made up of an operating system kernel and a small user space that has a minimal set of libraries and daemons necessary to run containers. The container image is made up of the libraries, interpreters, and configuration files of an operating system user space, as well as the developer’s application code.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games: The Spicy Meatball Saves The Day, Uebergame, DwarfCorp

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.