Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Bloomberg Release Open Source “PowerfulSeal” Kubernetes-Specific Chaos Testing Tool

    t the recent KubeCon North America conference, in Austin, USA, Bloomberg presented their new open source "PowerfulSeal" tool, which enables chaos testing within Kubernetes clusters via the termination of targeted pods and underlying node infrastructure. The Kubernetes container orchestration platform is a popular choice for deploying (distributed) microservice-based applications, and practices from chaos engineering can assist with building resilient systems.

    PowerfulSeal follows the Principles of Chaos Engineering, and is inspired by the infamous Netflix Chaos Monkey. The tool allows engineers to "break things on purpose" and observe any issues caused by the introduction of various failure modes. PowerfulSeal, written in Python, is currently Kubernetes-specific and only has "cloud drivers" for managing infrastructure failure for the OpenStack platform, although a Python AbstractDriver class has been specified in order to encourage the contribution of drivers for additional cloud platforms.

  • Do the little things matter?

    In the world of free software engineering, we have lofty goals: the FSF's High Priority Project list identifies goals like private real-time communication, security and diversity in our communities. Those deploying free software in industry have equally high ambitions, ranging from self-driving cars to beating the stock market.

    Yet over and over again, we can see people taking little shortcuts and compromises. If Admiral McRaven is right, our failure to take care of little decisions, like how we choose an email provider, may be the reason those big projects, like privacy or diversity, appear to be no more than a pie-in-the-sky.

  • POSITAL Announces New Open Source Interfaces for Motor Feedback Kit Encoders [Ed: Stop characterising mere interfaces as "open source"]

    Rotary encoder specialist POSITAL has expanded its interface offerings for its magnetic Kit Encoders, launched with great success last year, with support for the non-proprietary open-source BiSS Line communication protocol. This enables the practical implementation of single-cable technology, which is becoming increasingly popular with motor and robot manufacturers. POSITAL’s easy-to-install motor feedback kits, which feature 17-bit electronic resolution, bridge the gap between simple resolvers and more complex and expensive optical encoders for servomotors, robot joints and other applications where absolute rotary position feedback is required.

  • No Boo-Boo on API validation with SmartBear

    The product is used to validate and test an Application Programming Interfaces (API) and generate its OpenAPI documentation.

    As the so-called API economy now comes into being — and exists as a defined elemental ‘thing’ inside the wider software application development universe — there is (very arguably) additional need for tools that can quantify, qualify and indeed validate and test how software developers will integrate with APIs and get them to function as intended.

  • Xiaomi needs to adhere to the rules of Android

    Most Android smartphone users understand the operating system which powers their device is “open source.” For many, that’s where their understanding ends. The legality of open source technology like Android is a mystery outside the geeky inner circle of coders and hackers who make a hobby out of tinkering with the system.

    [...]

    Here’s a brief synopsis of the ins and outs of the laws governing Android:

    Android is based on Linux, an open-source operating system. Linux is published under the General Public License (GPL), which regulates how Linux can be used, edited, and distributed.

    On top of the Linux kernel, there are lots of other components to Android. Most are also licensed under an “open source” license. The preferred license for the Android Open Source Project is the Apache Software License, Version 2.0 (“Apache 2.0”), and the majority of the Android software is licensed with Apache 2.0.

    Anyone can download and share the Linux kernel for free. If they edit the Linux code in any way, they can share that too, as long as they make the altered system available for anyone else to freely download. This is because their Linux derivative is still bound to the GPL.

    Since Android is a Linux derivative, it is thus bound by the GPL. Therefore, the Android source code must be freely available to anyone who would like to see it.

    If anyone changes the Android source code, it is also bound to the respective licenses. If that new code is then amended, it is regulated by the same license, and so on ad infinitum.

  • Siemens, GE Partner With Open-Source Innovation Community

    Siemens PLM Software and Launch Forth are partnering to empower and educate the future workforce by offering free professional CAD software to a co-creation community of 185,000 innovators that are focused on product development, idea generation, and creating solutions for challenges both big and small.

    As businesses and lines of work trend toward a global gig economy, Siemens and Launch Forth hope to enable and support the future workforce by providing them with the tools and tutorials they need to learn and grow within their career. According to Forbes, 57.3 million people make up the freelance community in the US alone.

Open source voice assistant speaker promises user privacy

Filed under
OSS

Mycroft has Kickstarted an open source “Mycroft Mark II” smart speaker and voice assistant that runs Linux on a quad-core Xilinx SoC, and offers a 6-mic beamforming array, 10W speaker, 4-inch touchscreen, and a promise of user privacy.

When Mycroft launched its Kickstarter campaign for the original, voice-activated Mycroft home automation hub back in Aug. 2015, the Amazon Echo speaker and its Alexa voice agent had made a splash, but had yet to become a household fixture, and Google had yet to launch its Google Home with its Google Assistant agent. Now, the company has returned to Kickstarter to launch a more powerful, and similarly open source hardware and software Mycroft Mark II into a market in which sales of Alexa and Google Assistant based voice activated devices are soaring along with concerns about invasions of privacy.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • "Anyone and Everyone," Leslie Hawthorn Reflects on 20 Years of Open Source.

    The Open Source Software Movement and the Open Source Initiative will celebrate our 20th anniversary in 2018. As part of that celebration, we're asking open source luminaries to reflect on the past twenty years—the milestones, success, controversies, and even failures—to capture and understand our shared history, and the impact of the open source movement on not only software and technology, but also business, community and culture. We're also curious to hear what those who have done so much to help drive open source to where it is today, on where it should go tomorrow.

  • Linux.Conf.Au 2018 Videos Now Available
  • OpenHPC: Building Blocks

    I will be giving two talks about OpenHPC in the next weeks.

  • KDAB at ERTS², Toulouse, France
  • Lessons learned from the A-Frame category in the js13kGames competition

    It’s been a while since the js13kGames 2017 competition ended in September last year, but it’s worth recalling as it was the first time with a brand new category – A-Frame. Let’s see what some of the competition participants have to say about the challenges of developing playable WebVR entries limited to just 13 kilobytes each.

  • Mozilla Empowers Journalists with the Power of A-Frame

    Technology is continually providing us with new ways to create and publish stories. For these stories to achieve their full impact, it requires that the tools to deploy them become accessible and easy to use.

    That’s one of the reasons why Mozilla has worked to develop A-Frame, a framework that makes it easy for anyone to build virtual reality experiences for the web.

  • Celebrating the tenth anniversary of International Data Privacy Day

    As we gear up to celebrate the tenth anniversary of International Data Privacy Day on January 28, we want to highlight Mozilla’s efforts to create awareness and help protect your personal information.

    As champions of a healthy and safer internet, we don’t care about your privacy just one day a year. Every day is data privacy day for us. And we don’t mean this as a gimmick. Mozilla isn’t your average tech company. We are a not-for-profit dedicated to keeping the web open and accessible to all. Privacy and safeguarding your personal data is the core of our mission. And of our products. Firefox Quantum and everything else we do from policy to advocacy or fun social media activities are rooted in that principle.

  • Facebook open source initiative to boost network development
  • Oculus creates a new, open source unit of time to measure frame rates
  • Tigera raises $10M to help enterprises secure their cloud native applications

    Tigera decided to go with an “open core” model that combines open source with the company's closed-source tools as it's building out its business.

  • Asgard: The Open Source Air Data Computer

    We get a lot of awesome projects sent our way via the tip line. Well, mainly it seems like we get spam, but the emails that aren’t trying to sell us something are invariably awesome. Even so, it’s not often we get a tip that contains the magic phrase “determine Mach number” in its list of features. So to say we were interested in the Asgard Air Data Computer (ADC) is something of an understatement.

  • Report: 80’s kids started programming at an earlier age than today’s millennials

    Almost immediately, you notice an interesting trend. Those in the 18 to 24 age group overwhelmingly started their programming journey in their late teens. 68.2 percent started coding between the ages of 16 to 20.

    When you look at older generations, you notice another striking trend: a comparatively larger proportion started programming between the ages of five and ten. 12.2 percent of those aged between 35 and 44 started programming then.

  • Security Chaos Engineering: A new paradigm for cybersecurity

    Security is always changing and failure always exists.

    This toxic scenario requires a fresh perspective on how we think about operational security. We must understand that we are often the primary cause of our own security flaws. The industry typically looks at cybersecurity and failure in isolation or as separate matters. We believe that our lack of insight and operational intelligence into our own security control failures is one of the most common causes of security incidents and, subsequently, data breaches.

Mozilla and OSS Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS
  • MOSS Q4 2017 Update

    We’ve just published MOSS’s Q4 2017 update, bringing you up to speed on what’s going on in the world of MOSS (Mozilla Open Source Support, our program for giving back to the open source and free software community).

  • Mozilla Communities Speaker Series #2 #PrivacyMonth
  • Mozilla Fixes 32 Security Flaws, Accelerates Performance in Firefox 58

    Mozilla released its first web browser update for 2018 on Jan. 23 with the debut of Firefox 58. The new release includes features designed to accelerate performance as well as patches for 32 security vulnerabilities.

    Firefox 58 is the second major release in the Quantum series, which became generally available in November 2017 with Firefox 57. A core element of the Firefox Quantum browser series is performance, and that has been improved even more in Firefox 58, thanks to a capability called Off-Main-Thread-Painting (OMTP).

  • Plex VR, Firefox 58.0, SteamOS and More

    Firefox 58.0 was released yesterday, and Project Quantum continues to deliver performance gains. Read the release notes for more information on all the improvements.

  • Data Center Network Software Startup Cumulus Raises $43M

    Says it will use the money to expand outside the US, bring more Fortune 500 companies into the fold

  • MOSS Q4: Supporting the Python Ecosystem

    Mozilla was born out of, and remains a part of, the open source and free software movement. Through the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) program, we recognize, celebrate, and support open source projects that contribute to our work and to the health of the Internet. That’s why in 2017 we invested $1,650,000 in supporting open source projects around the globe. Half a million of which we dispersed just since our last update in October.

  • Opensource gratitude

    Some weeks ago I’ve read somewhere in Twitter about how good will be to adopt and share the practice of thanking the opensource developers of the tools you use and love. Don’t remember neither who or where, and probably I’m stealing the method s/he proposed.

  • GrammaTech Releases Automated Software Engineering Library Into Open Source

    Researchers in automated software engineering now have access to proven industrial strength tools to automate common programming tasks. GrammaTech, Inc., a leading developer of commercial embedded software analysis and transformation tools, announced immediate availability of their Software Evolution Library (SEL) as open source software, licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL).

  •  

Open Hardware/3-D Printing

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Meltdown And Spectre Processor Vulnerabilities: Is It Time To Revive Open Source Alternative?

    The beginning of the year 2018 brought new challenges in the form of Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities in most of the processor architectures.  In layman terms, both of these vulnerabilities allow hackers to steal sensitive data like passwords.  This vulnerability is applicable to Intel, AMD, and ARM. This means the problem is universal as it affects almost all devices ranging from embedded devices, smartphones, desktops, and servers to supercomputers.

  • When the canary breaks the coal mine

    Nobody likes it when kernels don't work and even less so when they are broken on a Friday afternoon. Yet that's what happened last Friday. This was particularly unsettling because at -rc8, the kernel is expected to be rock solid. An early reboot is particularly unsettling. Fortunately, the issue was at least bisected to a commit in the x86 tree. The bad commit changed code for an AMD specific feature but oddly the reboot was seen on non-AMD processors too.

    It's easy to take debug logs for granted when you can get them. The kernel nominally has the ability for an 'early' printk but that still requires setup. If your kernel crashes before that, you need to start looking at other debug options (and your life choices). This was unfortunately one of those crashes. Standard x86 laptops don't have a nice JTAG interface for hardware assisted debugging. Debugging this particular crash was not particularly feasible beyond changing code and seeing if it booted.

  • DIY Open-Source PantoProbe Precision Probe

    Electronics enthusiasts, hobbyists and makers looking for a handy tool to help you troubleshoot their latest project, may be interested in an open source PantoProb created by Kurt Schaefer. As you can see from the image above the open source probe requires a few 3D printed parts as well as some off-the-shelf hardware which is easily sourced. Kurt has also provided full instructions and a Github repo with all the necessary files to make your very own 3D printed testing probe. Check out the video below to learn more.

  • What the Apple 3D Printing Patents Mean for Our Industry

    Recently Apple has been granted a patent for a color 3D printing idea whereby the printed object is first made and then colored in afterwards. This idea is a straightforward one; using it one could print an object using FDM for example and then later color it with an inkjet print head. This method would play to both technologies’ strengths with FDM making for strong objects that are very dimensionally accurate but often suffer from poor surface quality. By having a separate print head then color in and, more importantly perhaps, strengthen and smooth over the object as well as add things such as conductivity, the resulting object would look nice as well. This could be a potential breakthrough in expanding 3D printing.

Victory for libre networks: ActivityPub is now a W3C recommended standard

Filed under
OSS
Web

I'm happy to announce that after three years of standardization work in the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Social Working Group, ActivityPub has finally been made an official W3C recommended standard. Hooray!

ActivityPub is a protocol for building decentralized social networking applications. It provides both a server-to-server protocol (i.e. federation) and a client-to-server protocol (for desktop and mobile applications to connect to your server). You can use the server-to-server protocol or the client-to-server protocol on their own, but one nice feature is that the designs for both are very similar. Chances are, if you've implemented support for one, you can get support for the other with very little extra effort! We've worked hard to make ActivityPub easy to understand. If this is your first time reading about it, I recommend diving into the overview.

Read more

Openwashing: Spying, IKEA, Toads and Wharton

Filed under
OSS
  • Facebook Open-sources ‘Detectron’ Computer Vision Algorithm for AR Research
  • IKEA’s New ‘Open Source’ Sofa Is Designed to Be Hacked

    British designer Tom Dixon’s portfolio is an eclectic one, including everything from high-concept paperweights to masculine scented candles. But his recent collaboration with Swedish furniture retailer IKEA might be one of his most fascinating: the design of a modular sofa with seemingly endless combinations and configurations.

  • Quest Updates Toad Open Source Database Tools [Ed: ECT in the domain "Linux Insider" promotes proprietary software (which it describes wrongly). Marketing as 'news'.]

    Quest Software on Monday announced a series of updates to its Toad open source database software applications, including new versions of its Toad Edge, Toad Data Point and Toad Intelligence Central products.

    After launching the first version of Toad Edge last summer, the company began seeing an uptick in downloads of freeware that supported MySQL on its Toad World community site. It also received requests to support MariaDB and Postgres, according to Julie Hyman, senior product manager at Quest.

    "The customers are now champing at the bit for support of those additional platforms and we are delivering," she told LinuxInsider.

    The company began supporting MariaDB last month. It will provide support for Postgres with a Toad World preview release in February and commercial availability by April or May.

  • The Emperor Has No Clothes: Recasting Leadership In The Open-Source Era

    Rajeev Peshawaria discusses his new book: Open Source Leadership: Reinventing Management When There’s No More Business as Usual.

Why is cryptocurrency open source? This paper from 1999 explains

Filed under
OSS
Security
Sci/Tech

Cryptocurrency's roots go back further than bitcoin. In fact, bitcoin was just the first cryptocurrency to use the blockchain rather than the first cryptocurrency ever.

Other early cryptocurrencies include now venerable names like World of Warcraft (WoW) gold, a digital currency designed for use as a store of value and a transfer medium in the gaming universe of World of Warcraft. It used a proof-of-work mining algorithm in which users would engage with the WoW ecosystem via their computer's graphical interface and complete various digital tasks to be rewarded with gold.

As the fiat currency value of WoW gold increased, it attracted more miners without any corresponding difficulty adjustment, eventually leading to substantial inflation and a collapsing economy.

Today's cryptocurrencies seem to have learned from the problems of the past. For example, bitcoin and many others will adjust mining difficulty to prevent massive inflation when mining power increases.

It's no surprise that almost everything cryptocurrency, from the coins to the exchanges to the wallets, are built on open-source software. This paper from 1999 might be more relevant than ever, especially with a few wallets and coins still being partly or entirely closed source.

Read more

The Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN)

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • ​Linux Foundation seeks to bring rhyme and reason to open-source networking projects

    Open source is transforming networking. Ever since OpenFlow appeared in 2011 and showed that we could use software to improve networking, open-source software, and not hardware, has blazed the future of networking. There was only one problem. There are far, far too many open-source networking projects. The Linux Foundation, home to nine of the 10 largest open-source networking projects, has decided enough is enough. These communities have come together to form the LF Networking Fund (LFN) for cross-project collaboration.

  • Linux Foundation Creates New Umbrella LF Networking Fund for Open-Source Networking Projects

    The Linux Foundation announced a broad restructuring effort for its networking projects on Jan. 23 that will see a new grouping known as the LF Networking Fund (LFN) emerge as the top-level organization.

  • Linux Foundation Combines 6 Networking Projects Into 1

    Six Linux Foundation open source networking projects are combining into one new project known as the LF Networking Fund (LFN). The six initial projects are ONAP, OPNFV, OpenDaylight, FD.io, PDNA, and SNAS.

    Arpit Joshipura will serve as executive director of LFN for the Linux Foundation. Joshipura’s previous title had been general manager of networking and orchestration at the Linux Foundation. “We are going horizontal,” said Joshipura. “I will be driving the general business management of LFN.”

  • Samsung Joins Linux Foundation Networking Fund as Platinum Member

    Samsung Electronics announced today that it has become a Platinum Member of the Linux Foundation Networking Fund.

    The Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN) is a new entity that integrates the governance of participating projects in order to enhance operational excellence, simplify member engagement, and increase collaboration across open source networking projects and standards bodies.

Containers, the GPL, and copyleft: No reason for concern

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Though open source is thoroughly mainstream, new software technologies and old technologies that get newly popularized sometimes inspire hand-wringing about open source licenses. Most often the concern is about the GNU General Public License (GPL), and specifically the scope of its copyleft requirement, which is often described (somewhat misleadingly) as the GPL’s derivative work issue.

One imperfect way of framing the question is whether GPL-licensed code, when combined in some sense with proprietary code, forms a single modified work such that the proprietary code could be interpreted as being subject to the terms of the GPL. While we haven’t yet seen much of that concern directed to Linux containers, we expect more questions to be raised as adoption of containers continues to grow. But it’s fairly straightforward to show that containers do not raise new or concerning GPL scope issues.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: Voting Machines With Windows and Back Doors in Windows Help Crypto-jacking

  • Election Security a High Priority — Until It Comes to Paying for New Voting Machines [Ed: Sadly, the US has outsourced its voting machines to a private company whose systems are managed by Microsoft]
    When poll workers arrived at 6 a.m. to open the voting location in Allentown, New Jersey, for last November’s gubernatorial election, they found that none of the borough’s four voting machines were working. Their replacements, which were delivered about four hours later, also failed. Voters had to cast their ballots on paper, which then were counted by hand. Machine malfunctions are a regular feature of American elections. Even as worries over cybersecurity and election interference loom, many local jurisdictions depend on aging voting equipment based on frequently obsolete and sometimes insecure technology. And the counties and states that fund elections have dragged their heels on providing the money to buy new equipment.
  • Congress Can Act Right Now to Prevent Interference in the 2018 Elections [Ed: "confidence" is not security]

    To create that confidence the SAFE Act would: [...]

  • America’s Election Meddling Would Indeed Justify Other Countries Retaliating In Kind
    There is still no clear proof that the Russian government interfered with the 2016 U.S. election in any meaningful way. Which is weird, because Russia and every other country on earth would be perfectly justified in doing so.
  • NSA Exploit Now Powering Cryptocurrency Mining Malware [Ed: Microsoft Windows back door]
    You may have been asked if you'd like to try your hand at mining cryptocurrency. You may have demurred, citing the shortage in graphics cards or perhaps wary you were being coaxed into an elaborate Ponzi scheme. So much for opting out. Thanks to the NSA, you may be involved in mining cryptocurrency, but you're likely not seeing any of the benefits.
  • Cryptocurrency-mining criminals that netted $3 million gear up for more
    Separately, researchers from security firm FireEye said attackers, presumably with no relation to the one reported by Check Point, are exploiting unpatched systems running Oracle's WebLogic Server to install cryptocurrency-mining malware. Oracle patched the vulnerability, indexed as CVE-2017-10271, in October.

today's howtos

More Android Leftovers

Benchmarking Amazon EC2 Instances vs. Various Intel/AMD CPUs

Given the recent performance changes following the Spectre/Meltdown CPU vulnerability mitigation and having just wrapped up some fresh CPU bare metal benchmarks as part of that testing as well as the recent AMD Raven Ridge launch, I've carried out a fresh round this week of benchmarks on various Amazon EC2 on-demand instance types compared to a number of bare metal Intel and AMD processors in looking at how the compute performance compares. Read more