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OSS

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • IBM in Blockchain Collaboration for Food Safety

    Another new use has been found for blockchain. Last week, IBM announced that it's collaborating with a group of 10 major food suppliers "to identify new areas where the global supply chain can benefit from blockchain." It appears that initially the focus will be on tracking food products as they move their way from farm to processing facilities to grocery store shelves. The deal includes Dole, Driscoll’s, Golden State Foods, Kroger, McCormick and Company, McLane Company, Nestlé, Tyson Foods, Unilever and Walmart.

  • Eurovision, Matrox, Telvue join open source alliance

    The SRT Alliance, an open-source initiative dedicated to overcoming the challenges of low-latency video streaming, announces that 14 new members have joined the initiative including Eurovision Media Services, Matrox and Telvue.

    Now with more than 35 members, the SRT Alliance’s rapid growth supports continued adoption and development of the low latency SRT open source video transport protocol across a variety of industries. Founded by Haivision and Wowza, the SRT Alliance is focused on developing SRT to be an alternative to proprietary and expensive transmission protocols by offering an open source solution that can deliver low-latency video with greater reliability and performance in sub-optimal networks.

  • Rocket.Chat Extends Support to Open Source Initiative and Community

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI), the founding organization of the open source software movement, announced Rocket.Chat has joined the global non-profit as a Premium Corporate Sponsor. Rocket.Chat joins Craigslist Foundation, Facebook, Github, Google, Heptio, HPE, IBM, USB Direct, and many more sponsors, supporters and members committed to increasing awareness of open source software, and participation within the innovative communities that enable its continued advancement.

  • The next release of OpenStack, Pike leaps up

    Whatever else has ever been said about OpenStack, no one has ever said the open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud was easy to deploy or update. With the release of Pike, the 16th version of OpenStack, that's changing.

    Pike, and the two updates, Queens and Rocky, to follow it, won't bring major new features or changes. Instead, each will build on the Ocata release. Ocata, too, was focused on improving stability, scalability, and performance of the core services.

  • What Do the Most Successful Open Source Projects Have In Common?

    Thriving open source projects have many users, and the most active have thousands of authors contributing. There are now more than 60 million open source repositories, but the vast majority are just a public workspace for a single individual. What differentiates the most successful open source projects? One commonality is that most of them are backed by either one company or a group of companies collaborating together

  • Leadership lessons from open source software

    As chief information officer, I leverage many of the lessons I learned from maintaining or contributing to open source software. While I find insights from other areas, experience drives learning, and my twenty years of personal experience in open source software has taught me much about accepting feedback, listening to others, and sharing the burden. This applies directly to my professional career.

  • The Importance of Choosing the Correct Mastodon Instance

    Remember, Mastodon is a new decentralized social network, based on a free software which is rapidly gaining users (already there is more than 1.5 million accounts). As I’ve created my account in June, I was a fast addict and I’ve already created several tools for this network, Feed2toot, Remindr and Boost (mostly written in Python).

    Now, with all this experience I have to stress out the importance of choosing the correct Mastodon instance.

    [...]

    As a social network, Mastodon is truly decentralized, with more than 1.5 million users on more than 2350 existing instances. As such, the most common usage is to create an account on an open instance. To create its own instance is way too difficult for the average user. Yet, using an open instance creates a strong dependence on the technical administrator of the chosen instance.

  • How open source analytics can boost your cybersecurity arsenal

    Data growth never stops and the sheer volume and variety of this data has challenged organizations to makes sense of it all. Over the last few years, these groups have been turning to big data solutions to extract valuable insights and actionable intelligence from these massive new sets of data. Now organizations are beginning to leverage this same technology to modernize and reinforce their cybersecurity posture.

  • Digital-O-Mat: Compare your views on Internet policies with the parties for the German federal election 2017

    CDU/CSU (conservatives) and FDP (liberals) marked their position as "neutral" and answered in a very similar fashion. Unfortunately, these parties avoid making a clear stance and ultimately confirm the status quo. On one hand, they do consider the use of Free Software, on the other hand, so they say, there are multiple other aspects to consider weigh in. However, they list functionality and usability for example, even though they have no relation to the licence in use. When asked about the migration of existing IT systems, CDU/CSU prefer decision making on a case-by-case basis, while FDP dodged our question.

    Although the SPD (labour) also marked their answer as "neutral", they support the deployment and development of Free Software in public administrations and educational institutions, "to foster the creation of innovative businesses in the local market". Die Linke (lefts) and Bündnis 90/Die Grünen (greens) position themselves as supporters of deployment and public funding of Free Software. The greens consider Free Software to be a "cornerstone for secure and future-proof IT systems", and the lefts also fully support it, as long as there are no concerns regarding security or operation.

  • Putting German Politicians On The Record

    In Canada, there seems to be only one party on the record as favouring FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software), but the other parties don’t even have a position… Too bad. Now that I’m determined to use renewable energy and drive an electric car, I may be in the mood to change my vote next election over one last issue.

Purism on Coreboot and More

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OSS
Security
  • Coreboot and Skylake, part 2: A Beautiful Game!

    While most of you are probably excited about the possibilities of the recently announced “Librem 5” phone, today I am sharing a technical progress report about our existing laptops, particularly findings about getting coreboot to be “production-ready” on the Skylake-based Librem 13 and 15, where you will see one of the primary reasons we experienced a delay in shipping last month (and how we solved the issue).

  • Purism Highlights Challenges During Coreboot Development

    Taking a brief break from their Librem 5 smartphone campaign, there's a new Purism blog post today that explains at length why this summer's Librem laptop shipments were delayed due to a pesky Coreboot bug lasting weeks and what it took to come to a workaround.

  • Linux Phone Crowdfunder Passes $100k Milestone

    Computer maker Purism‘s crowdfunding campaign for a privacy-focused phone powered by open-source software has raised over $100,000 in just 4 days.

    At the time of writing $104,300 has been pledged to the project, which aims to deliver a full-featured Linux phone powered, in part, by Matrix.org‘s communication platform.

Linux and Open Source on the Move in Embedded, Says Survey

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Linux
OSS

AspenCore has released the results of an embedded technology survey of its EETimes and Embedded readers. The survey indicates that open source operating systems like Linux and FreeRTOS continue to dominate, while Microsoft Embedded and other proprietary platforms are declining.

Dozens of market studies are happy to tell you how many IoT gizmos are expected to ship by 2020, but few research firms regularly dig into embedded development trends. That’s where reader surveys come in handy. Our own joint survey with LinuxGizmos readers on hacker board trends offer insights into users of Linux and Android community-backed SBCs. The AspenCore survey has a smaller sample (1,234 vs. 1,705), but is broader and more in depth, asking many more questions and spanning developers who use a range of OSes on both MCU and application processors.

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Facebook's React Patents License and OSI

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OSS
Legal
  • Why Not to Overreact to Facebook's React Patents License

    The reaction to this news is surprising, given the parallel patent licensing model is nothing new. Facebook released its “BSD+Patents” grant in 2013 (with a revision in 2015). But a similar model was used with some fanfare by Google with its WebM codec in 2010. This licensing model involves two parallel and simultaneous grants of rights: a BSD license to the copyright in the software, and a separate grant to practice patents that read on the software. Putting the two together means there are two independent and parallel grants of rights. In this respect, it is quite similar to the Apache 2.0 license which, like BSD, is a permissive license, and which also contains a defensive termination provision that exists alongside the copyright license grant.

    Much of the reaction to Apache Foundation’s announcement has just created confusion, such as this article misleadingly calling it “booby-trapped.” In fact, many open source licenses have defensive termination provisions — which are mostly considered a reasonable mechanism to discourage patent lawsuits, rather than a booby trap. They are also the rule rather than the exception; all major open source licenses with patent grants also have defensive termination provisions — each with slightly different terms. The difference between the Facebook grant, which Apache has rejected, and the Apache 2.0 license, which Apache requires for its projects, is more subtle than the controversy suggests.

    [...]

    Defensive termination provisions of the scope in the Facebook grant are very common in patent licensing, outside of the open source landscape. Most patent licenses terminate if the licensee bring patent claims against the licensor. The reason is that a licensor does not want to be unilaterally “disarmed” in a patent battle. Most patents are only used defensively — asserted when a competitor sues the patent owner. A sues B and then B sues A, resulting in mutually assured destruction. If B has released its software under an open source license without a broad defensive termination provision, B is potentially without recourse, and has paid a high price for its open source code release. A gets to simultaneously free ride on B’s software development and sue B for patent infringement.

    Finally, the Facebook grant itself is not new. The grant was released in 2013, and ReactJS’ popularity has been growing since then. As with many open source licenses, the industry’s willingness to absorb a new license depends on the tastiness of the code released under it. In the case of ReactJS, the code was great, and the patent license terms were new, but reasonable.

  • The Faces of Open Source: Till Jaeger

    Dr. Till Jaeger features in the fifth episode of Shane Martin Coughlan's, "The Faces of Open Source Law." The series was shot during breaks at the FSFE Legal Network 'Legal and Licensing Workshop' in Barcelona during April 2017, and is provided here to promote greater understanding of how the law and open source projects and communities are interacting and evolving.

What Do the Most Successful Open Source Projects Have In Common?

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Linux
OSS

Thriving open source projects have many users, and the most active have thousands of authors contributing. There are now more than 60 million open source repositories, but the vast majority are just a public workspace for a single individual. What differentiates the most successful open source projects? One commonality is that most of them are backed by either one company or a group of companies collaborating together

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Leadership Lessons from Open Source Software

    I’ve been involved in open source software since I was a university student, both as a user and a contributor. Today, I’m a chief information officer in local government. While my day job is unrelated to my personal interest in open source software, I find leverage in many of the lessons I learned throughout my history in open source software projects.

    Let me first share my background. I’m of an age that I used MS-DOS when I was growing up. MS-DOS was pretty much the workhorse operating system of the 1980s and early 1990s. If you had a desktop computer in the office, the odds were good that the computer ran on MS-DOS.

    As an undergraduate physics student in the early 1990s, I used MS-DOS for everything. I wrote papers in a DOS word processor, I analyzed physics lab data using a DOS spreadsheet, and wiled away my free time by playing DOS games. I considered myself a DOS power user. So I was understandably upset when, in 1994, I read in technology magazines that Microsoft planned to do away with MS-DOS with the next release of Windows.

  • 4 digital technologies that are worth an investment this year

    Open source technology

    Organizations used to avoid releasing open source version of their products until a few years ago. However, Linux operating system and other open source projects proved that it could significantly generate more revenues.

    Arduino is a relatively new example of technology that has introduced open source hardware to the common market. It allows everyone to develop and release their projects without copyright constraints. A ray of the sunshine for students and professionals alike, making it convenient for them to develop an incredible amount of innovation. Arduino is a microprocessor capable of anything from lasers and 3D printers to fingerprint scanners and motion detectors.

    It is considered as a long term player in the tech sector and given its open source position in the market, is worth a look as a viable long term investment.

  • Intermountain Uses Open Source to Improve HIT Infrastructure

    Red Hat announced that Intermountain Healthcare is now using Red Hat solutions to migrate its proprietary legacy platforms to open source platforms to improve and modernize its HIT infrastructure.

    Salt Lake City-based Intermountain Healthcare is a non-profit health system with 22 hospitals and nearly 1,500 physicians at over 180 clinics. Its large size prompted the organization to seek more advanced technology that would offer the flexibility and automation needed to serve all its locations.

  • Is Open Source Software the Future of VR?

    We have seen a lot of hype about virtual reality (VR) in the past few years, and we're currently seeing the same rush to VR that we previously saw with 3D printing. Right now, the barrier to entry for VR is still relatively high and geared towards large content providers and serious studios. But as the equipment and software to produce VR content become cheaper and more sophisticated, adoption of the technology will increase. This means that while we're currently in the early adoption phase of VR, the landscape will be very different in the next five years. By then, VR will be well on its way to mainstream adoption.

  • Samsung partners 20th Century Fox & Panasonic to expand the new HDR10+ tech

    Digital technology giants 20th Century Fox, Panasonic Corporation, and Samsung Electronics have announced a new tripartite partnership which would see them creating an open, royalty-free dynamic metadata platform for High Dynamic Range (HDR). The platform would be created through an associated certification and logo program which is tentatively called HDR10+. The three partnership would form a licensing body which would begin issuing the license for the HDR10+ platform in January 2018.

  • Samsung, 20th Century Fox, Panasonic to open source HDR10+ tech

    Samsung Electronics, 20th Century Fox and Panasonic have announced plans to join forces to create an open, royalty-free metadata platform for HDR10+ video technology. The aim is to form an entity that will begin licensing the HDR10+ platform to content companies, ultra-high definition TVs, Blu-ray disc players/recorders and set-top box manufacturers, as well as SoC vendors in January 2018.

  • Musician Taryn Southern on composing her new album entirely with AI

    Southern used an open source AI platform...

  • How Can Open Source Become User-Centric? [Ed: article from Phipps reposted just now]

    Including design and UX in a true community project is a challenging matter of balance because of the motivational model behind open source projects.

    According to The Cathedral and the Bazaar, the key motivation for participants in open source projects is “scratching their own itch.” One consequence of this is co-ordination of contributions to support user-centric design is inherently an optional extra in a true open source project with multiple independent participants. We all wish there was a way to get genuine user experience quality as a key dynamic of open source projects. But there are two big reasons that is challenging.

  • Outreachy Summer 2017 Yielded A New Coloring Book, Wine AppDB Improvements

    Not only is GSoC wrapping up now as school nears for many of the involved student developers, but the Outreachy internship program is also ending this coming week.

    The Outreachy Summer 2017 program is wrapping up on 30 August with running a similar length to Google Summer of Code. The Outreachy May - Augusy 2017 internship program offers stipends of $5500 USD and for this session was available to "(Sleepy you are a resident or national of any country or region other than Crimea, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Syria, or Sudan and identify as a woman (cis or trans), trans man, or genderqueer person (including genderfluid or genderfree) or (ii) you are a resident or national of the United States of any gender who is Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin@, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander."

    There wasn't as much Outreachy coverage on Phoronix as with GSoC due to many of the projects surrounding documentation, quality assurance, and other areas not generally within our interest area on the site. But the participants do deserve praise for successfully completing their summer work and now becoming engaged with the open-source community.

  • [GSoC 2017 - BTRFS write supports] Third coding period - Final recap
  • Haiku Made Progress On Btrfs Support This Summer

    One of the Google Summer of Code projects this summer for the BeOS-inspired Haiku operating system was on porting the Btrfs file-system.

    The student developer working on adding write support for Btrfs to Haiku experienced partial success in this feat for having this next-generation Linux file-system be working under this BeOS-inspired platform. BeOS can now handle creating/removing directories, various other write-related functionality is in place, etc.

  • freenode #live - even more confirmed speakers
  • Perl in Japan

    Perl is used in many different fields, by programmers from all over the world. Western countries have a large number of companies that use Perl and implicitly Perl developers, with a solid community that touches base every year through events like The Perl Conference formerly known as YAPC. But further east there are other YAPC events, a bit different and a lot bigger. They’re not exclusive to Perl developers and bring together more than a thousand participants each year.

    A quick search on Perl conferences in Japan would lead you to YAPC::Okinawa 2018 ONNASON. That will be the next Perl conference in Japan, with the same name that we’re accustomed too. As a side note, from 2006 to 2015 Perl conferences in Japan were called YAPC :: Asia Tokyo. These were the largest Perl conferences in terms of number of participants.

  • Chrome wants to remember which Websites to silence

    Chrome's developers are testing a permanent mute for Websites that insist on running autoplay videos the instant they load.

    Having a loud car advertisement or “listen to our editor talk about this story you're trying to read” is a scourge for those who visit sites to read text, and that's why Chrome's François Beaufort posted this brief announcement of the feature-test.

  • starting the correct Chromium profile when opening links from IRC

    I am using Chromium/Chrome as my main browser and I also use its profile/people feature to separate my work profile (bookmarks, cookies, etc) from my private one.

  • Intel Haswell Scheduler Updated In LLVM

    Last month in LLVM there was new Sandy Bridge scheduler information to improve the instruction scheduling and other hardware detail changes so LLVM can generate more efficient code for those older CPUs. At that time we learned Intel developers were also planning improvements too for LLVM with newer Haswell / Broadwell / Skylake / Skylake-X CPUs. Improvements have now landed for Haswell.

  • Wanted: GNU Project Maintainers — Part 2

    This article is a continuation of my last article on GNU projects that are in current need of maintainers. When I first read about the projects GNU needed help with, I was drawn to Gnubik from my own personal love of Rubik’s Cube puzzles. I ended up liking the program and wanted to help so I reached out to the maintainer, who replied back asking about my background and letting me know where help was needed at if I was still interested. Since then, I’ve slowly been helping out where I could and enjoying learning more about the code behind the program. I’m hoping that by writing about these projects, someone will have the time and skill set to help out that wasn’t aware of these projects. I also hope that even if people can’t help out they will download the software, try them out and maybe end up like me.

  • 3D Images of 20,000 Vertebrates Open Source with oVert Museum Specimen Initiative

    While 3D scanning has been used to solve a murder case and recreate a metal passenger aircraft, among other things, it’s really making a positive impact for museums. But I’m not just talking about recreating pieces of artwork: scientists and researchers all over the world are using CT scan 3D imaging to scan museum specimens to learn more about ancient species. Thanks to a $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), a new initiative called oVert, short for openVertebrate, has launched, in order to get specimens off of museum shelves and onto the Internet – by CT scanning 20,000 vertebrates and making the 3D images available to students, researchers, educators, and the general public.

  • These Heroes Are Rescuing Our Government’s Data

    Organizing initially out of concern that the new administration might erase or obscure climate and other environmental data, data rescuers’ worst fears seemed to be coming true when one of the Trump White House’s first actions was to delete climate-change pages from its website. Then the US Department of Agriculture, after removing animal-welfare inspection reports from its website, responded to a National Geographic Freedom of Information Act request with 1,771 pages of entirely redacted material.

Open source success starts at zero

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OSS

This has applicability in a lot of different areas in life. For example, I use it in my volunteer efforts with Cal Fire, where integrating as part of an overall team effort in fire prevention and firefighting is required to get the job done.

Here are concrete ways you can aim to be a zero in an open source project, with your eye toward making +1 contributions in the future.

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Jump-start your career with open source skills

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OSS

Although attending college is not required for success in software development, college programs can provide a great deal of useful information in a relatively short period of time. More importantly, they are designed to cover all necessary concepts without the knowledge holes some self-taught practitioners suffer. College programs also often include theory and history, which can form the foundation for professional exploration and decision-making.

Yet college graduates entering the workforce often find their coursework has emphasized theory over the practice, technologies, and trends required for success on the job. The reason? Curricula take time to develop, so institutions of higher education often teach technologies and practices that are at the tail end of current usage.

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GNOME: GSoC Projects

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Google
OSS
GNOME
  • GSoC part 15: submission

    This is the last entry in the Google Summer of Code series that I have been writing weekly for the last three months. It is different from the usual updates in that I won’t be discussing development progress: rather, this will be the submission report for the project as a whole. I’ll be discussing the "why?" behind the project, the plan that my mentor and I came up with to execute the project, the work I have done over the summer including a video of the result, the things that are left to work on, what I’ve learned during the project and finally, the links to the code that I have written for the actual submission. Of course I finish with a thank-you. Enjoy!

  • Piper Has Turned Into A Very Competent Mouse Configuration UI For Linux

    Student developer Jente Hidskes' work this summer on improving the Piper GTK3 user-interface for configuring gaming mice on Linux via libratbag is now the latest example of a very successful Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project.

    Jente was able to provide some much needed improvements to this GTK3 user-interface for configuring Linux mice via the libratbag daemon. Among the work he accomplished this summer were support for mouse profiles, resolution configuration, LED configuration, button mappings, welcome and error screens, and more.

  • GNOME Games Now Supports Controller Reassignment

    Thanks to this year's Google Summer of Code, there is a branch pending for allowing game controllers to be re-assigned within GNOME Games.

    GNOME Games, of course, is the GTK desktop program to browse your video game library and when it comes to retro games, even play them within GNOME Games thanks to libretro, etc.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Riot.im/Web 0.12 — WIDGETS HAVE LANDED!! + Jitsi Video conferencing + New Composer, Mentions & Emoji Picker!

    Riot.im 0.12 is here and by golly it’s a big one! The main headline is that WIDGETS HAVE LANDED!!! — small form web apps you can share with everyone in a room, unlocking a whole new dimension of collaboration within Riot. We’ve been working on this for months, and it’s insanely exciting to see us finally able to start decorating our rooms with Hangouts-quality video conferences (from Jitsi), document editors, graphing dashboards, and anything else you can imagine!

  • Convenient Industrial Ethernet Master Is Now Open-Source and Free

    Offered by Bosch Rexroth under MIT open-source license, the software can also come with a Sercos-on-a-Stick livesystem demo on a free USB thumb drive. The livesystem is useful for those looking to learn how to use the software.

  • Google Builds Open-Source Voice Kit For AI Devices

    Google researchers have open-sourced snippets of data to give developers using artificial intelligence tools the ability to create basic voice commands for smart devices. This will help users query content and help the devices recognize meaning and search for answers.

    The TensorFlow and AIY teams at Google built the Speech Commands dataset, a Voice Kit created with a collection of 65,000 utterances of 30 words. Google released the tool to help developers or anyone who wants to train AI models.

  • A heartfelt thank you to all who contribute to FOSS

    I am not good at TL:DR and this won't be short to warn you up front. When I sat down to make the original post I was emotional because everything in my life is shit and breaking and hopeless. I was melting in the heat and humidity as the AC broke and my body doesn't do well with extremes. Some people I had been waiting on for possible help with other things for a very long time had finally made it clear they were never going to help and had been jerking me around. My pain has been worse lately. I lost access to even the shit income based medical care I can get because of rule changes. My living situation is miserable. I was sitting there thinking about just getting it over with like I often do and is sadly all too common in people with chronic pain or other illness (don't panic or post hotlines please..this is an ongoing thing and I have tried all the usual stuff...I need health and money and have done all I can to that end)...and the ONE thing that was working was this free OS and the tools I was using right then to distract myself. Everything else I need in life is some costly thing or service and never seems to work right and I am alone and miserable...and here was this FREE thing that people donate to that was my belay line in that moment. It was sort of an emotional drunk text if you will. All around me people and things suck and I just wanted to say thanks to the people who sat and braided that rope for little to nothing in return. When everything is so terrible you appreciate the things that aren't with some intense clarity.

    So I post that thanks expecting it to drop off the page by the evening and instead of being ignored or argued with or told to pull on my bootstraps when I dont even have any proverbial boots at this point...people posted offers of laptops, practical suggestions for pain relief, and ways to help give back even though I am just one or two levels above everyone's parents in tech competency. I've posted my story in moments of desperation several times over the years on various throwaway accounts. I've asked everyone I know irl and online for help and hope. Not once in any other community or place or time have so many people been so willing to help and giving practical advice rather than platitudes and word noise. No victim blaming, no absurd "The Secret" sort of advice, no empty gestures. It just further reinforces my feeling of thanks to the community. I thank you and you offer more. Most people really underestimate how much the smallest practical kindness can matter to someone. If more of the world's problems were met with the FOSS attitude and community spirit it could only be a benefit.

  • Embedded Linux Conference Europe schedule published

    The Linux Foundation has posted a schedule for the Embedded Linux Conference Europe, to be held Oct. 23-25 in Prague with the Open Source Summit Europe.

    Full program notes are available for the combined Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) and Open Source Summit Europe event to be held in Oct. 23-25 in Prague, with discounted registrations of $800 still available through Aug. 27. The Open Source Summit combines the previous LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen conferences.

  • Mozilla ponders making telemetry opt-out, 'cos hardly anyone opted in

    Mozilla may require users to opt-out of sending telemetry from its Firefox browser because so few have opted in that it's hard for developers to get a good sample of what causes problems.

    The idea of opt-out telemetry has sparked a pretty lively mailing-list debate (at the time of writing, 42 posts in just a couple of days, from 31 authors, on what's a moderately-obscure topic) about how to improve that data collection.

    The rough consensus so far is that if it approaches the question right, Firefox could flip to opt-out – just so long as it doesn't become a stalker.

    The solution for that, as the thread discusses, is to follow Google's lead and implement what's known as differential privacy has used by Google's project RAPPOR).

  • GSoC 2017: Charmap Integration

    These awesome three months of summer spent developing for LibreOffice under Google Summer of Code, have filled me with great zeal and zest. A plethora of important additions was made to the software bundle under the project titled “Usability of Special Characters”, and these new features will be made available in the version 6.0 of LibreOffice (Release Notes for 6.0). Here is a glimpse of what the users will be receiving in the new update.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux, Docker Gain in Rented Space

LibreOffice Help From FSF, Mike Saunders

  • New FSF membership benefit: LibreOffice certification
    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced that the opportunity to apply for LibreOffice certification for migrations and trainings is now available to FSF Associate Members. LibreOffice is a free software project of The Document Foundation (TDF), a non-profit based in Germany. An office suite, LibreOffice encompasses word processing, and programs for the creation and editing of spreadsheets, slideshows, databases, diagrams and drawings, and mathematical formulae. It uses the ISO standard OpenDocument file format (ODF).
  • Marketing activities so far in 2017: Mike Saunders
    Thanks to donations to The Document Foundation, along with valued contributions from our community, we maintain a small team working on various aspects of LibreOffice including documentation, user interface design, quality assurance, release engineering and marketing. Together with Italo Vignoli, I help with the latter, and today I’ll summarise some of the achievements so far in 2017.

Debian/Ubuntu: Q4OS, Ubuntu Dock and LXD Weekly Status Update

  • There's Now a Windows 10 Installer for the Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distribution
    The Q4OS development team is pleased to inform us today about the immediate availability for download of a Windows installer for their Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution, Q4OS, allowing users to create a dual-boot environment on their PCs. For those not familiar to Q4OS, it's an open-source and free Linux distro based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), which resembles the look and feel of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop environment. Created with an emphasis on Windows users who want to migrate to a free, open-source, and more secure operating system, Q4OS now lets them install the distribution alongside Microsoft Windows in an easy manner, without having to do any modifications to your personal computer or install any other apps.
  • Ubuntu Dock Now Has Dynamic Transparency
    Ubuntu devs have listened to our gripe on the jarring contrast between GNOME 3.26's transparent top bar and the Ubuntu Dock.
  • Ubuntu Dock Features Adaptive Transparency on Ubuntu 17.10, Here's How It Works
    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche continues his development on the look and feel of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and today he announced that Ubuntu Dock is getting adaptive transparency. Canonical confirmed that Ubuntu 17.10 would come with the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, though the default session has suffered numerous modifications compared to the vanilla one to make things easier for those using the Unity interface on Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). Most probably, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users won't upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10, but we're sure Ubuntu 17.04 users will because it'll reach end of life in about four months from the moment of writing, sometime in January 2018. Therefore, Canonical wants to make their Unity to GNOME transition as painless as possible.
  • LXD: Weekly Status #15
    This week has been pretty quiet as far as upstream changes since half the team was attending the Open Source Summity, the Linux Plumbers Conference and the Linux Security Summit in Los Angeles, California.

Events: KDE/Randa 2017 and Linux Foundation

  • KMyMoney’s Łukasz Wojniłowicz in Randa
    Please read the following guest post from Łukasz who joined me last week in Randa to work on KMyMoney.
  • Randa 2017 – Databases are back to KMyMoney
    On the morning of Day 5 we chased and fixed a problem that was introduced a long time ago but never caused any trouble. The code goes back into the KDE3 version of KMyMoney and was caused by some changes inside Qt5. The fix prevents a crash when saving a transaction which opens an additional dialog to gather more information (e.g. price information). With the help of other devs here in Randa, we were able to drill down the problem and update the code to work on KF5/Qt5 keeping the existing functionality.
  • Randa 2017 – Days 3 and 4
    On Day 3, we started out at 7:02 as usual with the team responsible for breakfast meeting in the kitchen. KMyMoney wise, we worked some more on keyboard navigation and porting to KF5. The dialog to open a database and the logic around it have been rewritten/fixed, so that it is now possible to collect the information from the user and proceed with opening. The database I have on file for testing does not open though due to another problem which I still need to investigate.
  • Watch the Keynote Videos from Open Source Summit in Los Angeles
    If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit North America 2017 in Los Angeles, don’t worry! We’ve rounded up the following keynote presentations so you can hear from the experts about the growing impact of open source software.
  • uniprof: Transparent Unikernel for Performance Profiling and Debugging
    Unikernels are small and fast and give Docker a run for its money, while at the same time still giving stronger features of isolation, says Florian Schmidt, a researcher at NEC Europe, who has developed uniprof, a unikernel performance profiler that can also be used for debugging. Schmidt explained more in his presentation at Xen Summit in Budapest in July. Most developers think that unikernels are hard to create and debug. This is not entirely true: Unikernels are a single linked binary that come with a shared address space, which mean you can use gdb. That said, developers do lack tools, such as effective profilers, that would help create and maintain unikernels.