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Sci/Tech

7 Great Linux Statistical Analysis Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Sci/Tech

Science is the effort of seeking to comprehend how the physical world works. From observation and experimentation, science uses physical evidence of natural phenomena to compile data and analyze the collated information.

In modern research it is essential for scientists to keep abreast of the latest statistical software. Just like the fast moving world of research, developments in statistical software and methods continue to abound. Making full use of the improvements in computer software helps to advance the pace of research.

Science really prospers and advances when individuals share the results of their experiments with others in the scientific community. There is a certain logic that scientific software should therefore be released in a freely distributable environment.

Linux is particularly strong in the field of open source statistical software. The purpose of this article is to identify software for performing statistical analysis. This type of software helps to summarize data in a shorter form, and helps scientists understand a concept or representation and make possible predictions based on this understanding.

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GNU Scientific Library 2.6 released

Filed under
GNU
Sci/Tech

Version 2.6 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C.
This release introduces major performance improvements to common linear algebra matrix factorizations, as well as numerous new features and bug fixes. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.
The file details for this release are:
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz.sig
The GSL project homepage is http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/
GSL is free software distributed under the GNU General Public License.
Thanks to everyone who reported bugs and contributed improvements.
Patrick Alken

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Cantor 19.08

Filed under
KDE
Sci/Tech

Since the last year the development in Cantor is keeping quite a good momentum. After many new features and stabilization work done in the 18.12 release, see this blog post for an overview, we continued to work on improving the application in 19.04. Today the release of KDE Applications 19.08, and with this of Cantor 19.08, was announced. Also in this release we concentrated mostly on improving the usability of Cantor and stabilizing the application. See the ChangeLog file for the full list of changes.

For new features targeting at the usability we want to mention the improved handling of the “backends”. As you know, Cantor serves as the front end to different open-source computer algebra systems and programming languages and requires these backends for the actual computation. The communication with the backends is handled via different plugins that are installed and loaded on demand. In the past, in case a plugin for a specific backend failed to initialize (e.g. because of the backend executable not found, etc.), we didn’t show it in the “Choose a Backend” dialog and the user was completely lost. Now we still don’t allow to create a worksheet for this backend, but we show the entry in the dialog together with a message about why the plugin is disabled.

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Gnuastro 0.10 released

Filed under
GNU
Sci/Tech

Dear all,

I am pleased to announce the 10th release of GNU Astronomy Utilities
(Gnuastro 0.10).

Gnuastro is an official GNU package of various command-line programs
and library functions for the manipulation and analysis of
(astronomical) data. All the programs share the same basic
command-line user interface (modeled on GNU Coreutils). For the full
list of Gnuastro's library, programs, and a comprehensive general
tutorial (recommended place to start using Gnuastro), please see the
links below respectively:

https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-library.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-programs-list.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/General-program-usage-tutorial.html

Many new features have been added, and many bugs have been fixed in
this release. For the full list, please see [1] below (part of the
NEWS file within the tarball). Some of the highlights are: 1) You can
now do column arithmetic (on FITS and plain text tables) directly
within the Table program, it also has some operators unique to table
columns for example conversion of pixel to world coordinate system
(WCS) coordinates and vice-versa. 2) Crop can now be used to pull out
sections of 3D data cubes also. 3) You can let CosmicCalculator find
the red-shift by identifying an emission line's wavelength or name,
and its observed wavelength.

Here is the compressed source and the GPG detached signature for this
release. To uncompress Lzip tarballs, see [2]. To check the validity
of the tarballs using the GPG detached signature see [3]:

  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.10.tar.gz     (5.2MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.10.tar.gz.sig (833B)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.10.tar.lz     (3.4MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.10.tar.lz.sig (833B)

Here are the MD5 and SHA1 checksums (other ways to check if the
tarball you download is what we distributed):

886c7badcd5b94d28bb616013b303bfb  gnuastro-0.10.tar.gz
48d1081543ba19b5d1b59e6d29b3b349  gnuastro-0.10.tar.lz
fce509583955f4bf15a764f30c7720de9df01a83  gnuastro-0.10.tar.gz
23c7f8d570e7b2851302500b5227026cb0d76340  gnuastro-0.10.tar.lz

For this release, I am very grateful to Alexey Dokuchaev, Joseph Putko
and Raul Infante-Sainz for direct contributions to Gnuastro's
source. Hamed Altafi, Roberto Baena Gallé, Zahra Bagheri, Leindert
Boogaard, Bruno Haible, Raul Infante-Sainz, Lee Kelvin, Elham Saremi,
Zahra Sharbaf, David Valls-Gabaud and Michael Wilkinson (in
alphabetical order) also provided very good suggestions and bug
reports, I am very grateful to them.

If any of Gnuastro's programs or libraries are useful in your work,
please cite _and_ acknowledge them. For citation and acknowledgment
guidelines, run the relevant programs with a `--cite' option (it can
be different for different programs). Citations _and_ acknowledgments
are vital for the continued work on Gnuastro, so please don't forget
to support us by doing so.

This tarball was bootstrapped (created) with the tools below. Note
that you don't need these to build Gnuastro from the tarball, these
are the tools that were used to make the tarball itself. They are only
mentioned here to be able to reproduce/recreate this tarball later.
  Texinfo 6.6
  Autoconf 2.69
  Automake 1.16.1
  Help2man 1.47.10
  ImageMagick 7.0.8-58
  Gnulib v0.1-2794-gc8e2eee54
  Autoconf archives v2019.01.06-55-gc5711b3


The dependencies to build Gnuastro from this tarball are described
here:
  https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Dependencies.html

Best wishes,
Mohammad

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LabPlot has got some beautifying and lots of datasets

Filed under
KDE
Software
Sci/Tech

Hello everyone! The second part of this year's GSoC is almost over, so I was due to let you know the progress made in the last 3 weeks. I can assure you we haven't lazed since then. I think I managed to make quite good progress, so everything is going as planned, or I could say that even better. If you haven't read about this year's project or you just want to go through what has already been accomplished you can check out my previous post.

So let's just go through the new things step by step. I'll try to explain the respective feature, and also give examples using videos or screenshots.

The first step was to improve the welcome screen and make it easily usable, dynamic, clean and intuitive for users. This step was very important since the welcome screen is what the users will first get in contact with when they start using LabPlot.

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11 Best Free Linux Desktop Genome Browsers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Sci/Tech

In the fields of molecular biology and genetics, a genome is the genetic material of an organism. It consists of DNA (or RNA in RNA viruses). Each genome contains all of the information needed to build and maintain that organism. In humans, a copy of the entire genome—more than 3 billion DNA base pairs—is contained in all cells that have a nucleus.

In bioinformatics, a genome browser is a graphical interface for display of information from a biological database for genomic data. They are important tools for studying genomes given the vast amounts of data available. They typically load very large files, such as whole genome FASTA files and display them in a way that users can make sense of the information there. They can be used to visualize a variety of different data types.

Genome browsers enable researchers to visualize and browse entire genomes with annotated data including gene prediction and structure, proteins, expression, regulation, variation, comparative analysis, etc. They use a visual, high-level overview of complex data in a form that can be grasped at a glance and provide the means to explore the data in increasing resolution from megabase scales down to the level of individual elements of the DNA sequence.

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16 Best Free Linux Chemistry Tools

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

Chemistry is the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. It is an extremely vivacious science which deals with a molecular scale and atomic interpretation of the world we live in, helping us to understand that world. Chemistry is regarded as the central science, given its close links with physics and engineering, with biology and medicine, and with geology and earth science.

There are a number of different branches of chemistry. These include organic chemistry which studies the structure, properties, reactions, and composition of carbon-based compounds, and inorganic chemistry which deals with non-carbon compounds. Another important subdiscipline is physical chemistry which deals with the relations between the physical properties of substances and their chemical formations studying, in particular, atomic, subatomic, macroscopic, and particulate phenomena in chemical systems.

Chemistry is found in many different areas including all spheres of industry, research, teaching, forensic science, public health and much more. Moreover, at a fundamental level we are all chemists. Each time we breathe, boil a kettle, or strike a match, a chemical reaction takes place. We develop and function as a consequence of chemical processes taking place in our body. Chemistry therefore plays a significant role in everyone’s lives.

Science really prospers and advances when individuals share the results of their experiments with others in the scientific community. There is a certain logic that scientific software should therefore be released under an open source license. This article focuses on selecting the best open source software for chemistry. Hopefully there will be something for interest here for all budding chemists.

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Top 20 Best Computer Algebra Systems for Linux in 2019

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

Solving computational problems was the first inspiration behind the invention of computers. Although modern computers have come a long way since its inception, it continues to play the de-facto role in solving complex computations. A Computer Algebra System (CAS) is a software environment that allows tackling modern-day, complex computational problems without having to manipulate complicated equations or computational systems manually. These computer algebra systems can manipulate mathematical formulae in a manner similar to traditional mathematicians and thwarts away potential errors effectively. There are a wide variety of computer algebra systems for Linux, both general-purpose and specialized.

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Stellarium v0.19.1 has been released!

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

Thank you very much to community for bug reports, feature requests and contributions!

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Also: Stellarium 0.19.1 Released with A Large List of Changes

KStars v3.2.3 is Released!

Filed under
KDE
Sci/Tech

Another minor release of the 3.2.X series is released, KStars v3.2.3 is out for Windows/Mac/Linux. This would probably the last minor release of the 3.2.X series with 3.3.0 coming into development now.

This release contains a few minor bug fixes and some few convenient changes that were requested by our users.

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More in Tux Machines

DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 Gets Basic FSCK Support

While the Copy-on-Write file-system shouldn't technically require fsck support, basic file-system consistency checking support has been implemented anyhow. In the initial implementation, the fsck code for HAMMER2 cannot repair any damaged file-system but can only verify that the file-system is intact. Read more

A Look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta and Report From Akademy 2019

  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta, enjoy!

  • TSDgeos' blog: Akademy 2019

    It's 10 days already since Akademy 2019 finished and I'm already missing it :/ Akademy is a week-long action-packed conference, talks, BoFs, daytrip, dinner with old and new friends, it's all a great combination and shows how amazing KDE (yes, the community, that's our name) is. On the talks side i missed some that i wanted to attend because i had to extend my time at the registration booth helping fellow KDE people that had forgotten to register (yes, our setup could be a bit easier, doesn't help that you have to register for talks, for travel support and for the actual conference in three different places), but I am not complaining, you get to interact with lots of people in the registration desk, it's a good way to meet people you may not have met otherwise, so please make sure you volunteer next year ;) One of the talks i want to highlight is Dan VrĂĄtil's talk about C++, I agree with him that we could do much better in making our APIs more expressive using the power of "modern" C++ (when do we stop it calling modern?). It's a pity that the slides are not up so you'll have to live with KĂŠvin Ottens sketch of it for now.

Programming Leftovers

  • DevNation Live: Event-driven business automation powered by cloud-native Java

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, presented by Red Hat’s Maciej Swiderski, Principal Software Engineer, and Burr Sutter, Chief Developer Evangelist, you’ll learn about event-driven business automation using Kogito, Quarkus, and more. Kogito is a new Java toolkit, based on Drools and jBPM, that’s made to bring rules and processes to the Quarkus world. This DevNation Live presentation shows how Kogito can be used to build cloud-ready, event-driven business applications, and it includes a demo of implementing the business logic of a complex domain. Kogito itself is defined as a cloud-native business automation toolkit that helps you to build intelligent applications. It’s way more than just a business process or a single business rule—it’s a bunch of business rules, and it’s based on battle-tested capabilities.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.1 Brings CUDA CUStream Support, Other Encoder Improvements

    Following the February release of Video Codec SDK 9.0, NVIDIA recently did a quiet release of the Video Codec SDK 9.1 update that furthers along this cross-platform video encode/decode library.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Peter Farrell

    This week we welcome Peter Farrell (@hackingmath) as our PyDev of the Week! Peter is the author Math Adventures with Python and two other math related Python books. You can learn more about Peter by visiting his website.

  • Mutation testing by example: How to leverage failure
  • Reuven Lerner: Looking for Python podcast co-hosts

    As you might know, I’m a panelist on the weekly “Freelancers Show” podcast, which talks about the business of freelancing. The good news: The same company that’s behind the Freelancers Show, Devchat.tv, is putting together a weekly podcast about Python, and I’m going to be on that, too! We’ll have a combination of discussion, interviews with interesting people in the Python community, and (friendly) debates over the current and future state of the language.

  • Getting started with data science using Python

    Data science is an exciting new field in computing that's built around analyzing, visualizing, correlating, and interpreting the boundless amounts of information our computers are collecting about the world. Of course, calling it a "new" field is a little disingenuous because the discipline is a derivative of statistics, data analysis, and plain old obsessive scientific observation. But data science is a formalized branch of these disciplines, with processes and tools all its own, and it can be broadly applied across disciplines (such as visual effects) that had never produced big dumps of unmanageable data before. Data science is a new opportunity to take a fresh look at data from oceanography, meteorology, geography, cartography, biology, medicine and health, and entertainment industries and gain a better understanding of patterns, influences, and causality. Like other big and seemingly all-inclusive fields, it can be intimidating to know where to start exploring data science. There are a lot of resources out there to help data scientists use their favorite programming languages to accomplish their goals, and that includes one of the most popular programming languages out there: Python. Using the Pandas, Matplotlib, and Seaborn libraries, you can learn the basic toolset of data science.

Excellent Utilities: Liquid Prompt – adaptive prompt for Bash & Zsh

This is a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’re covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. There’s a complete list of the tools in this series in the Summary section. The Command Line Interface (CLI) is a way of interacting with your computer. And if you ever want to harness all the power of Linux, it’s highly recommended to master it. It’s true the CLI is often perceived as a barrier for users migrating to Linux, particularly if they’re grown up using GUI software exclusively. While Linux rarely forces anyone to use the CLI, some tasks are better suited to this method of interaction, offering inducements like superior scripting opportunities, remote access, and being far more frugal with a computer’s resources. For anyone spending time at the CLI, they’ll rely on the shell prompt. My favorite shell is Bash. By default, the configuration for Bash on popular distributions identifies the user name, hostname, and the current working directory. All essential information. But with Liquid Prompt you can display additional information such as battery status, CPU temperature, and much more. Read more