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Sci/Tech

Introducing CADIE

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Humor

google.com: For several years now a small research group has been working on some challenging problems in the areas of neural networking, natural language and autonomous problem-solving. Last fall this group achieved a significant breakthrough. Research group switches on world's first "artificial intelligence" tasked-array system.

5 Technologies that will shape the future of Linux

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Sci/Tech

handlewithlinux.com: I like to contemplate the technology of the future and there are some things I think will be very important in the future of Linux. Following a small list of 5 technologies that will in my opinion shape the future of linux.

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

nerdden.com: A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

Understanding Moore's Law

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Sci/Tech

arstechnica.com: In April of 1965, Electronics magazine published an article by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. The article and the predictions that it made have since become the stuff of legend, and like most legends it has gone through a number of changes in the telling and retelling.

Linux.com's guide to the 2008 US presidential candidates

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Sci/Tech

linux.com: As November's national election looms in the United States, voters can expect increasing coverage of the hot-button issues through the mainstream media and campaign ads. On issues important to the open source and free software communities, however, information is harder to come by. Today we take a look at what the Democratic and Republican candidates say about questions close to the FOSS voter.

KDE Congratulates CERN's Large Hadron Collider

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KDE
Sci/Tech

dot.kde.org: Today was Big Bang Day at CERN as the world's largest science experiment was turned on. Like all good technology enthusiasts the KDE developers have been keeping up with the progress of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

Large Hadron Collider - powered by Linux

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Linux
Sci/Tech

blog.internetnews.com: The most powerful physics project in the history of the known universe - The $10 Billion Large Hadron Collider (LHC)- shot its first light speed beam this morning around its 27 km circuit. Beyond the 20 years it took to build and half of all the world's astrophysicists, it also takes another key ingredient to make LHC work -- Linux.

Total solar eclipse on August 1, 2008, in Northern Hemisphere

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Sci/Tech

itwire.com: A total solar eclipse will begin in northern Canada early Friday morning, and sweep through Greenland, the Arctic, Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial solar eclipse will be seen in the northeastern parts of North America, and much of Europe and Asia.

openSUSE 11.0 - Smooth Outside and Rough Inside

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OS
Linux
News
OSS
SUSE
Sci/Tech

openSUSE 11.0 has been one of the most anticipated distributions of the 2008 release season. In terms of innovation, openSUSE is perhaps the most ambitious of all the highly popular Linux distros so far this year. Since its 10.0 release to the open source world in 2006, openSUSE has experienced its share of ups and downs, not the least of which has been questionable quality assurance on final releases. What will the 11.0 release bring to the Linux scene?

One tonne 'Baby' marks its birth

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Sci/Tech

bbc.co.uk: Sixty years ago the "modern computer" was born in a lab in Manchester. The Small Scale Experimental Machine, or "Baby", was the first to contain memory which could store a program.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: XML External Entity (XXE) Example and the Latest Patches

  • XML External Entity (XXE) Example

    According to OWASP, an XML External Entity attack is a type of attack against an application that parses XML input. This attack occurs when XML input containing a reference to an external entity is processed by a weakly configured XML parser. This attack may lead to the disclosure of confidential data, denial of service, server side request forgery, port scanning from the perspective of the machine where the parser is located, and other system impacts. If a parser accepts unsanitized XML, we can take advantage of that and send our own crafted external XML payload to exploit our target. This post won’t be long so let’s get into it.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, sdl, and unbound), Debian (clamav, libdatetime-timezone-perl, openssl, tcpdump, and tzdata), Fedora (cutter-re, jackson-annotations, jackson-bom, jackson-core, jackson-databind, jackson-parent, libapreq2, ming, opendmarc, radare2, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (kernel), and SUSE (axis, jakarta-commons-fileupload, kernel, sles12sp3-docker-image, sles12sp4-image, system-user-root, and webkit2gtk3).

Get to know Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager

Linux Virtualization Manager can manage multiple on-premises hosts running Oracle Linux KVM. Oracle enhanced Linux KVM in the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Release 5, an OS kernel tested and optimized for Oracle Linux 7 Update 5. Because Linux KVM is the same hypervisor used for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, admins have an easy migration path from the Linux Virtualization Manager environment to the Oracle Cloud platform. Linux Virtualization Manager also supports importing and exporting software appliances based on the Open Virtualization Format and Open Virtualization Archive standards. Oracle based Linux Virtualization Manager on the oVirt project, an open source virtualization platform developed by Red Hat. Linux Virtualization Manager relies on the oVirt engine for discovering KVM hosts and configuring storage and network resources. The platform supports KVM administration for multinode environments, offering a large-scale, centralized management platform for server and desktop virtualization. Read more

Python 3.8 Released

  • Python 3.8.0

    Python 3.8.0 is the newest major release of the Python programming language, and it contains many new features and optimizations.

  • Cool New Features in Python 3.8

    The newest version of Python is released today! Python 3.8 has been available in beta versions since the summer, but on October 14th, 2019 the first official version is ready. Now, we can all start playing with the new features and benefit from the latest improvements. What does Python 3.8 bring to the table? The documentation gives a good overview of the new features. However, this article will go more in depth on some of the biggest changes, and show you how you can take advantage of Python 3.8.

Linux Fu: Python GUIs For Command Line Programs (Almost) Instantly

Not every programmer likes creating GUI code. Most hacker types don’t mind a command line interface, but very few ordinary users appreciate them. However, if you write command line programs in Python, Gooey can help. By leveraging some Python features and a common Python idiom, you can convert a command line program into a GUI with very little effort. The idea is pretty simple. Nearly all command line Python programs use argparse to simplify picking options and arguments off the command line as well as providing some help. The Gooey decorator picks up all your options and arguments and creates a GUI for it. You can make it more complicated if you want to change specific things, but if you are happy with the defaults, there’s not much else to it. At first, this article might seem like a Python Fu and not a Linux Fu, since — at first — we are going to focus on Python. But just stand by and you’ll see how this can do a lot of things on many operating systems, including Linux. Read more Also: Applying C - Running Programs With Systemd