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Sci/Tech

Ultra-high speed network bows in Florida

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Sci/Tech

The Florida LambdaRail Network -- the next-generation Internet with 100 times the capacity of the previous system -- has gone live at 10 Florida universities, moving information at 10 gigabits per second.

Space station gets HAL-like computer

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Sci/Tech

A voice-operated computer assistant is set to be used in space for the first time on Monday – its operators hope it proves more reliable than "HAL", the treacherous speaking computer in the movie 2001.

Lawmakers Aim to Protect Public Broadband

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Sci/Tech

Fourteen U.S. states have passed laws limiting municipal broadband services, with large Internet providers lobbying against city-offered services. Two U.S. senators have jumped into a growing debate about whether cities should be allowed to create tax-funded broadband services, with the two introducing a bill that would prevent states from outlawing municipal broadband projects.

Smart home dream could be for all

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Sci/Tech

Smart homes in which a single button controls lighting, heating, security, music, film - everything digital - has long been promised, but has never quite delivered... until now?

Cars that run on overnight charge catch valley VC's eye

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Sci/Tech

With oil prices hitting new highs, venture capitalists are considering a kind of car you can plug into your home power outlet at night. And one person they'll be hearing from soon is Palo Alto's Felix Kramer.

New Software Changes Wireless Technology Functions on Demand

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Sci/Tech

Taking wireless technology to the next level, NASA is leading the way in the field of Software Defined Radio, or SDR, a wireless technology that gives an electronic device the ability to quickly and easily perform new functions on demand.

Boy hailed for air safety gadget

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Sci/Tech

A 12-year-old Scots schoolboy has been praised by airport bosses after inventing a gadget which could help prevent plane crashes by warning pilots of dangerous material lying on runways before they prepare to land. It wouldn't take a great deal of investment to install this in airports - Daryn's model was made for around £100.

Rodents May Be Partly to Blame for Outage

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Sci/Tech

New Zealand's largest telecommunications provider was checking Tuesday whether rats gnawing a cable were partly to blame for an outage that disrupted mobile phone and Internet services and shut down the country's Stock Exchange on Monday.

Perplexed consumers dial up tech 'geeks'

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Sci/Tech

"Help! Send a geek!"

That's the growing cry of technology shoppers across the USA as they grapple with increasingly complex computers and other consumer electronics.

Taking a trip down memory-chip lane

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Sci/Tech

Renewed interest in old-school computing is more than just a trip down memory-chip lane. Early computers are a part of our technological heritage, and also offer a unique perspective on how today's machines work.

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More in Tux Machines

GTK+ Gains Experimental Overlay Scrollbars

The overlay scrollbar work that was committed on Monday is about improving the scrolling experience for those using GTK+ applications from touch screens. This prototype widget allows for showing a scroll position indicator on touch screens while hiding the scrollbar -- it sounds similar to Ubuntu's GTK2/GTK3 overlay scrollbar support for Unity. Read more

3 Alternatives to the Adobe PDF Reader on Linux

Adobe has pulled the plug on supporting its PDF reader app for Linux. This should come as no surprise, as the last time Adobe Reader for Linux was updated came in May 2013. But until recently, you could at least download and install Reader on your Linux desktop machine. Now? You can’t. If you go to the Adobe Reader site, you’ll find the Linux installer is no longer available. Read more

How OpenStack powers the research at CERN

OpenStack has been in a production environment at CERN for more than a year. One of the people that has been key to implementing the OpenStack infrastructure is Tim Bell. He is responsible for the CERN IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group which provides a set of services to CERN users from email, web, operating systems, and the Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud based on OpenStack. Read more

WE’RE HOSTING AN OPENDAYLIGHT HACKFEST IN JAPAN!

The OpenDaylight Project has quickly grown to become a global community, with more than 250 contributors working to advance open SDN and NFV from all corners of the world. This includes 11 ambassadors worldwide and OpenDaylight User Groups (ODLUG) in six cities across three countries. We are excited to host our first OpenDaylight HackFest in Japan in less than two weeks, and the good news is that it’s free to attend. Read more