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Sci/Tech

Planet with three suns challenges astronomers

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Sci/Tech

In a scenario out of "Star Wars," astronomers have detected a planet outside our solar system with not one, but three suns, a finding that challenges astronomers' theories of planetary formation.

Sharp Develops 'Two-Way Viewing-Angle' LCD

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Sci/Tech

At last, a way to end squabbles over which TV channel to watch - without buying a second set. Sharp Corp. has developed a liquid-crystal display that shows totally different images to people viewing the screen from the left and the right.

New on eBay: 18-foot, flame-fisted 'mech'

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Sci/Tech

The 18-foot-tall giant in steelworker Carlos Owens' Alaska backyard isn't quite up to smashing Volkswagens--or taking the kind of pounding footsteps that might strike fear into the heart of an enemy.

MIT starts second wireless revolution

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Sci/Tech

Technology being developed at MIT promises to pave the way for the next generation of wireless networks, saving consumers hundreds of billions of dollars over the next 20 years.

Arizona School Will Not Use Textbooks

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Sci/Tech

A high school in Vail will become the state's first all-wireless, all-laptop public school this fall. The 350 students at the school will not have traditional textbooks. Instead, they will use electronic and online articles as part of more traditional teacher lesson plans.

Tech world hits 10

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Sci/Tech

In 1995, it was still OK to use the phrase "information superhighway." Netscape's initial public offering fueled the beginnings of the Internet bubble. The U.S. Department of Justice was casting a wary eye on Windows 95. And Amazon.com sold its first book. Here are 10 ways technology made history in 1995.

There's an extra-terrestrial conspiracy going on

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Sci/Tech

The British man thought to have hacked into 53 US government agencies' computer systems has spoken out about his discoveries in Nasa's networks.

Leading brains take on big ideas

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Sci/Tech

Luminaries from the worlds of technology, entertainment and design are gathering in Oxford to share their thinking about our future.

Good Laptop Gains Little From Built-In Cell Receiver

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Sci/Tech

WiFi isn't always there for the taking, even if you're willing to pay for it. Sony's new Vaio T350 includes a built-in GSM cellular data receiver that works out of the box and leaves the PC Card slot open for other uses.

Man Charged With Stealing Wi-Fi Signal

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Sci/Tech

Police have arrested a man for using someone else's wireless Internet network in one of the first criminal cases involving this fairly common practice.

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Phoronix on NVIDIA

  • Compute Shader Support Patches For NVIDIA Fermi On Nouveau
    Samuel Pitoiset has published a set of twelve patches for implementing compute shaders support within the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver for the GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" graphics processors.
  • NVIDIA Posts Latest PRIME Sync Patches On Road To Better Support
    Alex Goins of NVIDIA has spent the past several months working on PRIME synchronization support to fix tearing when using this NVIDIA-popular multi-GPU method. The latest patches were published this week.
  • The Best Graphics Card Brands For NVIDIA/AMD GPUs As A Linux Consumer?
    One of the most frequent topics I'm emailed about is any brand recommendations among NVIDIA and AMD AIB partners for graphics cards. For Linux users, is there a particular brand preference for graphics cards? The short story is, no, there isn't one particular brand when selecting either a GeForce or Radeon graphics card that a Linux gamer/enthusiast should go with over another AIB partner. Over the past 12 years of running Phoronix, there has been no single AIB partner that superbly stands out compared to the rest when it comes to graphics card AIB partner brands like ASUS, Zotac, HIS, MSI, etc. They all work under Linux, rarely the AIB differences extend beyond the heatsink/cooler and any default clock speed differences, and I haven't seen one that's over-the-top crazy about Linux. I also haven't seen any major partner consistently put the Tux logo or other Linux markings on their product packaging, let alone incorporate any Linux drivers onto their CD/DVD driver media.