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Sci/Tech

3D Printing's Next Revolution: Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Sci/Tech

3D printers may be trendy, but they are hardly new. One of the earliest of all is the RepRap project, which began back in 2005. As its name implies - it's short for "replicating rapid" prototyper - RepRap is designed to be able to produce copies of itself, or at least most of its parts. Not only that, it is completely open source, both in terms of its hardware (which uses Arduino kit) and software.

Because of its open nature it has gone on to form the basis of many other 3D-printing systems, including those from MakerBot.

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Linux Help for Neuroscientists

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

In past articles, I have looked at distributions that were built with some scientific discipline in mind. In this article, I take a look at yet another one. In this case, I cover what is provided by NeuroDebian.

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Linux Model Airplane Controller

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

linuxfordevices.com: Open source hacker community Gizmo For You is developing a Linux-based controller and separate receiver device to remotely control a model airplane or other vehicle.

SETI silences alien-seeking telescope array

Filed under
Sci/Tech

cnet.com: It seems, though, that economics is putting a difficult hue on our quest. According to the San Jose Mercury News, the SETI (Search For Terrestrial Intelligence) Institute has announced that it is setting aside some of its telescopes, as it cannot afford to run them.

Five things that technology made worse

Filed under
Sci/Tech

dedoimedo.com: Not everything about advancement is inherently good. Let me tell you about five pieces of modern technology that actually made life worse.

11 Epic Technology Disasters

Filed under
Sci/Tech

informationweek.com: Separating machine failures and negligent maintenance from unforeseeable circumstances isn't easy and no doubt there are some accidents worthy of mention that we've missed. In any event, these are the eleven worst tech-related disasters where mechanical or engineering failure played a significant role.

Top 10 Things Science Fiction Promised Us

Filed under
Sci/Tech
  • Top 10 Things Science Fiction Promised Us That Didn’t Happen in 2010
  • Top 10 Things Science Fiction Promised Us That DID Happen in 2010

The 10 biggest tech scandals of the decade

Filed under
Reiser
Sci/Tech
Misc

techrepublic.com: Choosing the worst tech disgraces of the past 10 years isn’t easy, but CNET News recently took a crack at it. The incidents that made the cut involve sexual harassment, stripper-crazed CEOs, spies, congressional investigations, and even murder.

Top 10 tech tricks we're sick of seeing in movies

Filed under
Movies
Sci/Tech
SciFi

cnet.com: Think how awesome it was the first time you saw a lightsaber in action. Or how your mind was officially shredded when Neo mastered the Matrix. Technology in movies is cool. But for every thrilling example of cool-ass tech, Hollywood seems to produce a tired, dated cliche.

Scientist infects himself with computer virus

Filed under
Sci/Tech

computerworlduk.com: A British scientist claims to have become the first human to be infected by a computer virus, in an experiment he says has important implications for the future of implantable technology.

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More in Tux Machines

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more

BSD Leftovers

  • LLVM/Clang 4.0 Is Running Late Due To Seven Blocker Bugs
    LLVM 4.0 was supposed to have been released by now, but it's running late due to open blocker bugs. Hans Wennborg commented on the mailing list that while the release should have happened on 21 February, serving as release manager, he hasn't tagged the release yet due to open blocker bugs.
  • FreeBSD-Based pfSense 2.3.3 Open-Source Firewall Released with over 100 Changes
    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the availability of a new point release to the pfSense 2.3 stable series, which adds over 100 improvements and a bunch of new features. Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p16, the pfSense 2.3.3 maintenance release is here more than seven months after the 2.3.2 update and introduces several new packages, including TFTP Server, LCDproc, cellular, and tinc, a lot of improvements for the OpenVPN and IPsec implementations, as well as numerous stability and security fixes from FreeBSD. Dozens of bug fixes are included in pfSense 2.3.3 for WebGUI, graphs and monitoring, gateways and routing, notifications, Dynamic DNS, captive portal, NTP and GPS, DNS, resolver and forwarder, DHCP and DHCPv6 servers, router advertisements, HA and CARP, traffic shaping, firewall, rules, NAT, aliases, states, users, authentication, and privileges.
  • “Hi, I’m jkh and I’m a d**k”
    Yesterday, I was privy to a private email message discussing a topic I care deeply about. I contacted the author and said “You really need to make this public and give this a wider audience.” His response boiled down to “if I wanted it to get a wider audience, I was welcome to do so myself.” So here’s my first ever guest post, from Jordan K Hubbard, one of the founders of the FreeBSD Project. While this discussion focuses on FreeBSD, it’s applicable to any large open source project.

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