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Sci/Tech

Dinosaur Sightings: 1970s computers

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c|net: This gallery showcases several 1970s-era machines from Steven Stengel's vintage computer collection. Stengel has graciously allowed CNET to republish his photos and descriptions. The Model 5100 is IBM's first microcomputer (not a mainframe) and is also considered the world's first portable computer.

NASA administrator Griffin predicts humans on Mars by 2037

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iTWire: At the 58th International Aeronautical Congress (IAC-2007), being held from September 24-28, 2007, NASA administrator Michael Griffin says “Our long-term game-plan is to put man on Mars by 2037”

See the Harvest Moon Wednesday, September 26, 2007

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iTWire: A Harvest Moon is a full Moon that appears closest to the autumnal equinox, which occurs in 2007 on September 23 in the northern hemisphere. The name “Harvest Moon” is named so because farmers are able to work later at night “harvesting” their crops due to the reflected light coming off of the full Moon.

Moore's Law: No more

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BBC: Speaking to BBC News, Dr Gordon Moore said that he expected the proposition that bears his name should continue "for at least another decade. Eventually, however, we're down approaching the dimensions of individual atoms and that's clearly as far as we can go down the path of shrinking dimensions."

Linux powered TreCorder speeds up data collection at crime scenes

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daniweb: A new forensic computer from a UK based company promises to make the task of gathering evidence at the scene of a crime much easier. The dual booting Windows XP and Suse Linux TreCorder portable forensic lab is built into a rugged portable chassis and can simultaneously copy up to three hard drives at a speed of 2GB per minute per drive.

Total lunar eclipse set to turn Moon red

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iTWire: Early Tuesday morning, August 28, 2007, a colorful lunar eclipse will be visible from Australia, parts of Asia, Japan, and most of the Americas. In the United States, the western part of the country will be favored with the best conditions.

The 'WOW' Signal turns 30

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cosmiclog: 30 years ago astronomer Jerry Ehman was looking over a printout of radio data from Ohio State University's Big Ear Radio Observatory when he saw a string of code so remarkable that he had to circle it and scribble "Wow!" in the margin. The printout recorded an anomalous signal so strong that it had to come from an extraordinary source.

Linux's answer to Microsoft's Surface

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tectonic: In May this year Microsoft's Bill Gates showed off his expensive touch-sensitive table called Surface. Now the Linux world has a similar project under development and has released videos of it in action. While the DiamondTouch employs a different technology to Microsoft's TouchLight, the final result is even better.

Is this the successor to the Nokia N800?

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engadget: Just when we're in full-on video game mode, along comes a friendly tipster with some shots of the supposed successor to Nokia's N800 Internet Tablet.

OpenMoko Neo1973 - an open source Linux based iPhone killer in the making ?

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All About Linux: OpenMoko is a GNU/Linux based open software development platform. What this means for the lay person is that using OpenMoko software development kit, phone manufacturers will be able to bring out mobile phones which have more or less the same features of the now widely known iPhone from Apple and much more - all this under an Open license powered by GNU.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Thunderbird 45.0 to Finally Bring GTK3 Integration for Linux, Sort Of

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OpenPHT 1.5.1 for Debian/sid

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A man with his Fingers in many millions of pies

At the time of writing, over five million Raspberry Pis have been sold. That’s the same as the number of ZX Spectrums sold in the 80s. And like the Spectrum, the Pi is likely to have a far-reaching legacy, helping the next generation of games designers and computer scientists find their feet. Countless numbers of people have helped make this happen, but Eben Upton has been there from the beginning. He’s the founder and the CEO of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and he’s still shaping every aspect of the Raspberry Pi, from its hardware to the software. We met Eben shortly before the launch of the model 2. He told us about the effort they’ve put into making the Pi better and how a chance conversation with the boss of Google shaped the Pi’s future. Read more

Linux for your Loved Ones

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