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Sci/Tech

Total lunar eclipse set to turn Moon red

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Sci/Tech

iTWire: Early Tuesday morning, August 28, 2007, a colorful lunar eclipse will be visible from Australia, parts of Asia, Japan, and most of the Americas. In the United States, the western part of the country will be favored with the best conditions.

The 'WOW' Signal turns 30

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Sci/Tech

cosmiclog: 30 years ago astronomer Jerry Ehman was looking over a printout of radio data from Ohio State University's Big Ear Radio Observatory when he saw a string of code so remarkable that he had to circle it and scribble "Wow!" in the margin. The printout recorded an anomalous signal so strong that it had to come from an extraordinary source.

Linux's answer to Microsoft's Surface

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Sci/Tech

tectonic: In May this year Microsoft's Bill Gates showed off his expensive touch-sensitive table called Surface. Now the Linux world has a similar project under development and has released videos of it in action. While the DiamondTouch employs a different technology to Microsoft's TouchLight, the final result is even better.

Is this the successor to the Nokia N800?

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Sci/Tech

engadget: Just when we're in full-on video game mode, along comes a friendly tipster with some shots of the supposed successor to Nokia's N800 Internet Tablet.

OpenMoko Neo1973 - an open source Linux based iPhone killer in the making ?

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Sci/Tech

All About Linux: OpenMoko is a GNU/Linux based open software development platform. What this means for the lay person is that using OpenMoko software development kit, phone manufacturers will be able to bring out mobile phones which have more or less the same features of the now widely known iPhone from Apple and much more - all this under an Open license powered by GNU.

Second open Linux phone on sale

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Sci/Tech

ZDNet: Another fully open source-based phone went on sale on Monday, offering developers the chance to build their own mobile Linux applications.

Girls get grounding in gigabytes

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Sci/Tech

telegram.com: The group of 10- to 14-year-olds was busy installing and configuring the Linux operating system on computers they had finished building.

Open-source software makes the invisible man

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Sci/Tech

PC Pro: A University of Liverpool mathematician claims 30-year-old open-source software has cracked the equation that will allow scientists to make objects - such as humans, tanks or even entire islands - invisible.

Computing Grid Helps Get to the Heart of Matter

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Sci/Tech

eWeek: At CERN, the PCs, CPU servers and disks are linked on a 1G-bps network provided by Hewlett-Packard ProCurve switches. CERN itself will contribute 10 percent of the total necessary processors for the job, including 3,500 PCs and the rest single- or dual-core processors all running a version of Linux called Scientific Linux CERN.

Terminator kill-bots to be run by system called 'Skynet'

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Sci/Tech

The Register: Following the announcement of the new Flying-HK-style "Reaper" death machines for the British forces, the prophetic nature of the Terminator movies has been further confirmed.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Recipes and Outreachy

  • Recipes for you and me
    Since I’ve last written about recipes, we’ve started to figure out what we can achieve in time for GNOME 3.24, with an eye towards delivering a useful application. The result is this plan, which should be doable.
  • Outreachy (GNOME)-W5&W6
    My plan was altered in this two-week, because the strings of GNOME 3.24 have not frozen yet and the maintainers of Chinese localization group told me the Extra GNOME Applications are more necessary to be translated than documents, so I began to translate the Extra GNOME Applications (stable) during this period.
  • [Older] Outreachy (GNOME)-W3&W4
    During this period, I finished the UI translation of GNOME 3.22, I’m waiting to reviewed and committed now, and I met some troubles and resolved them these days.

Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started. But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000. (Read the rest)

Leftovers: Gaming

Red Hat and Fedora