Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Sci/Tech

Mars Phoenix Lander - A Victory for Open Source

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

ostatic.com: Space agencies were some of the first places you could find open source software "in the wild". Being natural early adopters, cash-strapped and very inquisitive they naturally took to the concept.

Com One Phoenix Wi-Fi radio rises from embedded Linux platform

Filed under
Sci/Tech

linux.com: Com One's Phoenix Wi-Fi radio is a home music appliance built on an embedded Linux foundation. Phoenix lets you stream music or play podcasts as easily as you can listen to a car radio, once you tell it what you want to hear. Its ability to play Internet radio is nice -- but is it worth its price?

Total lunar eclipse February 20: Americas, western Europe

Filed under
Sci/Tech

itwire.com: On the evening of Wednesday, February 20, 2008, the greatest beauty (mid-point) of the total lunar eclipse will occur at approximately 10:26 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) on the east coast of the Americas, 7:26 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST) on the west coast, and 03:26 Universal Time (UT).

A First Tussle With Linux's iPhone Killer: The OpenMoko Neo1973

Filed under
Sci/Tech

wired: The Neo1973 is the first physical manifestation of a grand idea -- a new breed of wireless handheld built for the open-source age. Using Linux, it is the first release from the OpenMoko project, a group working to create a fully open source software platform for smartphones, a community-driven alternative to, say, the iPhone.

RIP Linux "Greenphone"

Filed under
Sci/Tech

linuxdevices: Trolltech has discontinued its Linux-based "Greenphone" development platform. Trolltech made a big splash with the Greenphone at LinuxWorld 2006. As the first Linux-based mobile phone with user-modifiable firmware, the phone was designed to provide wireless carriers and third-party application developers real-world target hardware.

No Linux Love for New iPods: Why You Shouldn't Care

Filed under
Sci/Tech

OSWeekly: Newsflash for those of you who believe that we lost iPod support - we never had it in the first place. It's true, and frankly, the fact that Apple has decided to make themselves even more isolated in their own world is fine by me.

Dinosaur Sightings: 1970s computers

Filed under
Sci/Tech

c|net: This gallery showcases several 1970s-era machines from Steven Stengel's vintage computer collection. Stengel has graciously allowed CNET to republish his photos and descriptions. The Model 5100 is IBM's first microcomputer (not a mainframe) and is also considered the world's first portable computer.

NASA administrator Griffin predicts humans on Mars by 2037

Filed under
Sci/Tech

iTWire: At the 58th International Aeronautical Congress (IAC-2007), being held from September 24-28, 2007, NASA administrator Michael Griffin says “Our long-term game-plan is to put man on Mars by 2037”

See the Harvest Moon Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Filed under
Sci/Tech

iTWire: A Harvest Moon is a full Moon that appears closest to the autumnal equinox, which occurs in 2007 on September 23 in the northern hemisphere. The name “Harvest Moon” is named so because farmers are able to work later at night “harvesting” their crops due to the reflected light coming off of the full Moon.

Moore's Law: No more

Filed under
Sci/Tech

BBC: Speaking to BBC News, Dr Gordon Moore said that he expected the proposition that bears his name should continue "for at least another decade. Eventually, however, we're down approaching the dimensions of individual atoms and that's clearly as far as we can go down the path of shrinking dimensions."

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Kernel: CH341 and LWN Articles (Just Freed)

  • Linux Adds CH341 GPIO
    There was a time when USB to serial hardware meant one company: FTDI. But today there are quite a few to choose from and one of the most common ones is the WCH CH341. There’s been support for these chips in Linux for a while, but only for use as a communication port. The device actually has RS232, I2C, SPI, and 8 general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins. [ZooBaB] took an out-of-tree driver that exposes the GPIO, and got it working with some frightening-looking CH341 boards.
  • Shrinking the kernel with an axe
    This is the third article of a series discussing various methods of reducing the size of the Linux kernel to make it suitable for small environments. The first article provided a short rationale for this topic, and covered link-time garbage collection. The second article covered link-time optimization (LTO) and compared its results to link-time garbage collection. In this article we'll explore ways to make LTO more effective at optimizing kernel code away, as well as more assertive strategies to achieve our goal.
  • The rest of the 4.16 merge window
    At the close of the 4.16 merge window, 11,746 non-merge changesets had been merged; that is 5,000 since last week's summary. This merge window is thus a busy one, though not out of line with its predecessors — 4.14 had 11,500 changesets during its merge window, while 4.15 had 12,599. Quite a bit of that work is of the boring internal variety; over 600 of those changesets were device-tree updates, for example. But there was still a fair amount of interesting work merged in the second half of the 4.16 merge window; read on for the highlights.

Wine-Staging and Games

Canonical Outs New Ubuntu Kernel Update with Compiler-Based Retpoline Mitigation

New Linux kernel security updates have been released for Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance), adding the compiler-based retpoline kernel mitigation for the Spectre Variant 2 vulnerability on amd64 and i386 architectures. Canonical fixed the Spectre Variant 2 security vulnerability last month on January 22, but only for 64-bit Ubuntu installations. This update apparently mitigates the issue for 32-bit installations too. Spectre is a nasty hardware bug in microprocessors that use branch prediction and speculative execution and it could allow unauthorized memory reads via side-channel attacks. Read more

Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People

If you are a privacy concerned netizen, try Tutanota. It is an open source email service for encrypted email communication. Here are the pros and cons of using Tutanota. Read more