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Sci/Tech

Mars Phoenix Lander - A Victory for Open Source

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OSS
Sci/Tech

ostatic.com: Space agencies were some of the first places you could find open source software "in the wild". Being natural early adopters, cash-strapped and very inquisitive they naturally took to the concept.

Com One Phoenix Wi-Fi radio rises from embedded Linux platform

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Sci/Tech

linux.com: Com One's Phoenix Wi-Fi radio is a home music appliance built on an embedded Linux foundation. Phoenix lets you stream music or play podcasts as easily as you can listen to a car radio, once you tell it what you want to hear. Its ability to play Internet radio is nice -- but is it worth its price?

Total lunar eclipse February 20: Americas, western Europe

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Sci/Tech

itwire.com: On the evening of Wednesday, February 20, 2008, the greatest beauty (mid-point) of the total lunar eclipse will occur at approximately 10:26 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) on the east coast of the Americas, 7:26 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST) on the west coast, and 03:26 Universal Time (UT).

A First Tussle With Linux's iPhone Killer: The OpenMoko Neo1973

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Sci/Tech

wired: The Neo1973 is the first physical manifestation of a grand idea -- a new breed of wireless handheld built for the open-source age. Using Linux, it is the first release from the OpenMoko project, a group working to create a fully open source software platform for smartphones, a community-driven alternative to, say, the iPhone.

RIP Linux "Greenphone"

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Sci/Tech

linuxdevices: Trolltech has discontinued its Linux-based "Greenphone" development platform. Trolltech made a big splash with the Greenphone at LinuxWorld 2006. As the first Linux-based mobile phone with user-modifiable firmware, the phone was designed to provide wireless carriers and third-party application developers real-world target hardware.

No Linux Love for New iPods: Why You Shouldn't Care

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Sci/Tech

OSWeekly: Newsflash for those of you who believe that we lost iPod support - we never had it in the first place. It's true, and frankly, the fact that Apple has decided to make themselves even more isolated in their own world is fine by me.

Dinosaur Sightings: 1970s computers

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Sci/Tech

c|net: This gallery showcases several 1970s-era machines from Steven Stengel's vintage computer collection. Stengel has graciously allowed CNET to republish his photos and descriptions. The Model 5100 is IBM's first microcomputer (not a mainframe) and is also considered the world's first portable computer.

NASA administrator Griffin predicts humans on Mars by 2037

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Sci/Tech

iTWire: At the 58th International Aeronautical Congress (IAC-2007), being held from September 24-28, 2007, NASA administrator Michael Griffin says “Our long-term game-plan is to put man on Mars by 2037”

See the Harvest Moon Wednesday, September 26, 2007

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Sci/Tech

iTWire: A Harvest Moon is a full Moon that appears closest to the autumnal equinox, which occurs in 2007 on September 23 in the northern hemisphere. The name “Harvest Moon” is named so because farmers are able to work later at night “harvesting” their crops due to the reflected light coming off of the full Moon.

Moore's Law: No more

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Sci/Tech

BBC: Speaking to BBC News, Dr Gordon Moore said that he expected the proposition that bears his name should continue "for at least another decade. Eventually, however, we're down approaching the dimensions of individual atoms and that's clearly as far as we can go down the path of shrinking dimensions."

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Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

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Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

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Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
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