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Sci/Tech

Scientific Linux 7.3 Released

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Red Hat
Sci/Tech
  • Scientific Linux 7.3 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3

    After two Release Candidate (RC) development builds, the final version of the Scientific Linux 7.3 operating system arrived today, January 26, 2017, as announced by developer Pat Riehecky.

    Derived from the freely distributed sources of the commercial Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 operating system, Scientific Linux 7.3 includes many updated components and all the GNU/Linux/Open Source technologies from the upstream release.

    Of course, all of Red Hat Enterprise Linux's specific packages have been removed from Scientific Linux, which now supports Scientific Linux Contexts, allowing users to create local customization for their computing needs much more efficiently than before.

  • Scientific Linux 7.3 Released

    For users of Scientific Linux, the 7.3 release is now available based off Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3.

The code that took America to the moon was just published to GitHub, and it’s like a 1960s time capsule

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OSS
Sci/Tech

When programmers at the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory set out to develop the flight software for the Apollo 11 space program in the mid-1960s, the necessary technology did not exist. They had to invent it.

They came up with a new way to store computer programs, called “rope memory,” and created a special version of the assembly programming language. Assembly itself is obscure to many of today’s programmers—it’s very difficult to read, intended to be easily understood by computers, not humans. For the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC), MIT programmers wrote thousands of lines of that esoteric code.

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Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

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OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

    Machine learning has come of age in public health reporting according to researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. They have found that existing algorithms and open source machine learning tools were as good as, or better than, human reviewers in detecting cancer cases using data from free-text pathology reports. The computerized approach was also faster and less resource intensive in comparison to human counterparts.

  • Machine learning can help detect presence of cancer, improve public health reporting

    To support public health reporting, the use of computers and machine learning can better help with access to unstructured clinical data--including in cancer case detection, according to a recent study.

FOSS and Artificial Intelligence

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OSS
Sci/Tech

RoboPhone: Sharp to Sell Real Android Phones in Japan

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Android
Sci/Tech

The Osaka-based electronics maker said Tuesday it would introduce a new mobile communication device in 2016 that is a tiny android robot. It will come with features of a smartphone including email, Internet connectivity, camera and a 2-inch display. Still to be decided is whether the device will use Google Inc.’s Android mobile operating system or another operating system.

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Accelerating Scientific Analysis with the SciDB Open Source Database System

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OSS
Sci/Tech

Science is swimming in data. And, the already daunting task of managing and analyzing this information will only become more difficult as scientific instruments — especially those capable of delivering more than a petabyte (that’s a quadrillion bytes) of information per day — come online.

Tackling these extreme data challenges will require a system that is easy enough for any scientist to use, that can effectively harness the power of ever-more-powerful supercomputers, and that is unified and extendable. This is where the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center’s (NERSC’s) implementation of SciDB comes in.

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Scientific Linux 6.7 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7

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Red Hat
Sci/Tech

The Scientific Linux team, through Pat Riehecky, has had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the Scientific Linux 6.7 computer operating system.

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Female SanDisk engineer who made it in Silicon Valley offers her words of wisdom

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OSS
Sci/Tech

At Milpitas-based flash memory storage and software company SanDisk Corp., Nithya Ruff, director of the company’s open source strategy, is a huge driver behind science, technology, engineering and math initiatives to get more girls interested in the field. After growing up in Bangalore, India, Ruff learned to code at North Dakota State University, where she earned her computer science master’s degree.

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Also: 8 ways Portland tech companies can follow through on diversity talk

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More in Tux Machines

Honor 9 Lite review: Leader of the affordable Android pack

As Huawei's budget brand, Honor handsets are well known for offering good value for money. With the Honor 9 Lite the 'good value' theme is raised a notch, thanks to an 18:9 aspect ratio 5.65-inch screen and no fewer than four cameras. Judging by its name, you might expect the Honor 9 Lite to be a trimmed-down version of the Honor 9, but there are some significant variances that suggest the new handset is a step sideways rather than a step down. The Honor 9's 5.15-inch 1,080-by-1,920 (16:9) screen is trumped here by a bigger, taller 5.65-inch 1,080-by-2,160 (18:9) display. There are also dual cameras front and back, whereas the Honor 9 only has dual rear cameras. At the time of writing the Honor 9 is selling for £349 (inc. VAT) direct from Honor, so the Honor 9 Lite's £199.99 looks very appealing. Read more

Linux command history: Choosing what to remember and how

Linux history – the record of commands that you’ve used on the command line – can simplify repeating commands and provide some very useful information when you’re trying to track down how recent system or account changes might have come about. Two things you need to understand before you begin your sleuthing, however, are that the shell’s command memory can be selective and that dates and times for when commands were run are optional. Read more

Security: Voting Machines With Windows and Back Doors in Windows Help Crypto-jacking

  • Election Security a High Priority — Until It Comes to Paying for New Voting Machines [Ed: Sadly, the US has outsourced its voting machines to a private company whose systems are managed by Microsoft]
    When poll workers arrived at 6 a.m. to open the voting location in Allentown, New Jersey, for last November’s gubernatorial election, they found that none of the borough’s four voting machines were working. Their replacements, which were delivered about four hours later, also failed. Voters had to cast their ballots on paper, which then were counted by hand. Machine malfunctions are a regular feature of American elections. Even as worries over cybersecurity and election interference loom, many local jurisdictions depend on aging voting equipment based on frequently obsolete and sometimes insecure technology. And the counties and states that fund elections have dragged their heels on providing the money to buy new equipment.
  • Congress Can Act Right Now to Prevent Interference in the 2018 Elections [Ed: "confidence" is not security]

    To create that confidence the SAFE Act would: [...]

  • America’s Election Meddling Would Indeed Justify Other Countries Retaliating In Kind
    There is still no clear proof that the Russian government interfered with the 2016 U.S. election in any meaningful way. Which is weird, because Russia and every other country on earth would be perfectly justified in doing so.
  • NSA Exploit Now Powering Cryptocurrency Mining Malware [Ed: Microsoft Windows back door]
    You may have been asked if you'd like to try your hand at mining cryptocurrency. You may have demurred, citing the shortage in graphics cards or perhaps wary you were being coaxed into an elaborate Ponzi scheme. So much for opting out. Thanks to the NSA, you may be involved in mining cryptocurrency, but you're likely not seeing any of the benefits.
  • Cryptocurrency-mining criminals that netted $3 million gear up for more
    Separately, researchers from security firm FireEye said attackers, presumably with no relation to the one reported by Check Point, are exploiting unpatched systems running Oracle's WebLogic Server to install cryptocurrency-mining malware. Oracle patched the vulnerability, indexed as CVE-2017-10271, in October.

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