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Sci/Tech

See the total lunar eclipse on March 3, 2007

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Sci/Tech

Without a total eclipse in almost two-and-one-half years, sky gazers will be able to observe a total lunar eclipse on Saturday, March 3, 2007 from the eastern Americas, the United Kingdom, Europe, Africa, Iceland, Greenaldn, Arctic, the Middle East in western Asia.

SCALE 5x - Linux Expo in Los Angeles This Weekend

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KDE
Linux
Google
Software
OSS
SUSE
BSD
Sci/Tech
Ubuntu

SCALE 5x, the 2007 Southern California Linux Expo will be held in Los Angeles, CA this weeken On Feb 9-11, 2007. It will include: 50+ seminars, 70+ exhibitors, BoFs, and more. Highlighted speakers will include Chris Dibona, Don Marti, Ted Haeger, Jono Bacon, and others. Exhibitors include: Dell, IBM, Verio, Redhat, GroundWork Open Source, ReactOS, Haiku OS, and PostgreSQL. One lucky attendee will win a Dual Xeon 1U Rackmount Server from Silicon Mechanics. Two other conference to be held on Friday Feb 9th include: Women In Open Source, and Open Source Health Care Summit.

Useful cloaking device is one step closer to reality

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Sci/Tech

Last October saw a major breakthrough in an area of research that, until very recently, was squarely in the realm of science fiction—cloaking technology.

French space agency to publish UFO archive online

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Sci/Tech

The French space agency is to publish its archive of UFO sightings and other phenomena online, but will keep the names of those who reported them off the site to protect them from pestering by space fanatics.

Alternatives to Skype beginning Jan 1, 2007

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Sci/Tech

My reasons are not the price. Yes, free is appealing and $14.95 / year is by no means a large expense to anyone. My main reason is that Skype does not use a standard protocol for its communication. There are many other SIP options available, most of which use an open communication protocol.

Also: A Free Telephone

IT in 2006: Google, Linux, Digg, Web-based Apps

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Sci/Tech

Most of the big tech stories of 2006 have already gotten far too much coverage. Does anyone not know that HP hit a serious bump in the road this year due to its snooping on employees and board members? Other stories – with far more long-term importance – have gotten much less ink.

Linux blasts off in U.S. tactical satellite

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Sci/Tech

Linux was shot into space Dec. 16, as part of a second-phase Air Force Research Laboratory program aimed at making space more "operationally responsive." The TacSat-2 (tactical satellite) program aims to create "micro satellites" that can be launched quickly and cheaply, to support tactical military operations.

VOIP on the Nokia 770 Internet Tablet

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Sci/Tech

I ended my previous article (Linux on the Nokia 770 Internet Tablet) by saying that the release of the OS 2006 prepared the way for some serious VOIP work. The 770 can now make SIP-based VOIP phone calls and is more like what you'd expect from Nokia--a phone!

Combo TV/PC gadget runs SUSE Linux on P4

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Sci/Tech

Hong Kong based systems integrator Quataris has updated its all-in-one Pentium 4 based analog TV/PC design. The new Ottimo model, which features an innovative mechanical design, supports processors up to 2.8GHz, comes with 15-, 17-, or 19-inch screens, and is available pre-installed with SUSE Linux.

Treo vs. Blackberry: My comparison and verdict

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Sci/Tech

I've been a Treo user since the day the 600 was first released. But then my Treo was stolen last week at Borders in Palo Alto, and I had to quickly get a replacement. I went to the Cingular store in search of a 680 but, as Fabrizio notes, announcing a product's availability and its actual availability are two very different things with Palm. The sales representative at the Cingular store suggested that I might like the Blackberry 8700.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

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