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Sci/Tech

CES 2006 Picks and Pans

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Sci/Tech

Last week I attended the 2006 Consumer Electronic Show (CES), which since the demise of Comdex has become the largest and most important trade show in the nation - not only for electronics, but for all technology. This year's show saw record attendance, which added to the energy and overall excitement of the event, but also jammed hotels, city streets and aisles on the show floor.

Linux powers WiFi-equipped LCD-TV

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Sci/Tech

Sharp used embedded Linux and Devicescape's WiFi stack to build a 32-inch flat-panel TV/PC display with a built-in 802.11a/b/g wireless media adapter. The IT-32X2 has a built-in HDTV tuner, and USB ports for viewing photos from digital cameras or USB storage devices.

Google confronts Microsoft mastery

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Sci/Tech

GOOGLE has stepped up its challenge to Microsoft, announcing plans for a video and television internet service and a package of programs that could break Bill Gates's stranglehold on the world's personal computers.

Day 3 at CES: What's hot

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Sci/Tech

This is day three at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), and for me, it's getaway day. The crowds at the show just seems to get bigger and bigger each day. Just trying to walk the aisles became a chore.

Consumer Electronics Show 2006

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Sci/Tech

Googly-eyed on the eve of CES, Analyst sets target at $600 per share as rumors swirl, Gates rolls out bold new Vistas, & Microsoft's next-generation system designed to be a living-room hub.

The Nokia 770: A Linux-based ugly duckling

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Sci/Tech

In my final column of 2005 I said that 2006 would be the year for Linux-powered consumer electronic devices. For the past few weeks I've been enthralled by one early example: the Nokia 770. The 770 is intended for one main purpose: accessing the Internet. Despite its shortcomings, Nokia's new "Internet tablet" could raise the bar for consumer-device development.

Hacking HTC's Windows CE phones with Linux

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Sci/Tech

There is a curious lack in the Linux community -- the number of community-led Linux distributions for commodity mobile phone hardware is zero. As reported two years ago by LinuxDevices.com, the aim of the Xanadux project is to change that, and this article describes how it's getting on.

Of bubbles and developers

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Sci/Tech

2005 in review - Silicon Valley is a different place these days. After years of dot-com fallout, 2005 saw tech companies regain their self confidence - a fact signified by rapacious M&A, guilt-free spending on marketing activities and bold strategic statements. Here are the events that made this year what it was, and that will have an impact on the coming 12 months.

Best Tech Moments of 2005

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Sci/Tech

In the tech world, 2005 was a period of bold ideas and exciting breakthroughs -- shadowed, at times, by devastating reversals. Here are our picks for the 10 best tech moments of 2005.

Linux Distributor Mandriva Adds Internet Telephony

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MDV
Sci/Tech

Linux distributor Mandriva on Wednesday said it has integrated Internet telephony software from Skype into the open-source operating system.

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Security Leftovers

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  • Zelda Coatings
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