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Sci/Tech

NYC subway gets $212m high-tech anti-terror scanners

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Sci/Tech

Thousands of cameras and sensors will be installed at platforms and subway stations as part of a sophisticated electronic surveillance and threat detection infrastructure, while mobile phone coverage will be extended underground across the public transport network to aid communications in any emergency situation.

Lucasfilm Partners With HP For Special-Effects Technology

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The "Star Wars" company will use Hewlett-Packard software for film and video game effects. LucasFilm also did effects for the "Harry Potter" and "Jurassic Park" series, as well as the recent "War of the Worlds."

Some internet phone customers may be cut off

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Providers of Internet-based phone services may be forced next week to cut off tens of thousands of customers.

Researchers take on electronic voting

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The National Science Foundation is gearing up to award a $7.5m grant to create a trustworthy electronic voting system.

Sun Micro announces open-source DRM project

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Sun Microsystems Inc., weighing in on the fractious issue of protecting copyrighted digital content, on Sunday announced a project it calls the Open Media Commons initiative aimed at creating an open-source, royalty-free digital-rights management standard.

5 years after the bust, a sober, new reality

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"Web 1.0: arrogance. Web 2.0: humility."

As the tech economy revs up again, a post-recession character emerges:

Drunken optimism is out; sober reality is in.
Job hopping is out; loyalty is in.
Living to work is out; working to live is in.
Greed is out; gratitude is in.

Paying for parking via cell phones

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A Finnish company has been in Boston pitching its cashless cell phone parking meter technology, officials said.

Number of Internet-Phone Consumers Soars

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The number of consumers bypassing the traditional phone network and opting for Internet voice service is soaring beyond expectations.

Bar at Milky Way's heart revealed

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The Milky Way is not a perfect spiral galaxy but instead sports a long bar through its centre, according to new infrared observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

Human-like skin gives robots sense of touch

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A flexible, electronic skin could provide robots, car seats and even carpets the ability to sense pressure and heat, Japanese researchers reported on Monday.

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