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Sci/Tech

Panasonic, NEC unveil 9 new Linux phones

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Sci/Tech

reuters.com: Panasonic Corp and NEC Corp unveiled nine new cell phone models on Tuesday that run the open-source LiMo operating system, wireless Linux group LiMo said.

How The Internet Works

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Sci/Tech

makeuseof.com: Once you finish this article, I’m sure you’ll be amazed that the Internet works at all! It’s easy to complain about slow download speeds, or lost e-mail, but, geez, it’s the Internet!

True believers: The biggest cults in tech

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Sci/Tech
Ubuntu

infoworld.com: Spend enough time around technology and it starts to get under your skin. It became a part of you. You began to identify with it, even develop a belief system around it. You may have attended regular meetings of others similarly afflicted, and openly despised members of other groups. Before you were even aware of it, you'd joined a cult.

Introducing CADIE

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Sci/Tech
Humor

google.com: For several years now a small research group has been working on some challenging problems in the areas of neural networking, natural language and autonomous problem-solving. Last fall this group achieved a significant breakthrough. Research group switches on world's first "artificial intelligence" tasked-array system.

5 Technologies that will shape the future of Linux

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Sci/Tech

handlewithlinux.com: I like to contemplate the technology of the future and there are some things I think will be very important in the future of Linux. Following a small list of 5 technologies that will in my opinion shape the future of linux.

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

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Linux
Sci/Tech

nerdden.com: A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

Understanding Moore's Law

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Sci/Tech

arstechnica.com: In April of 1965, Electronics magazine published an article by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. The article and the predictions that it made have since become the stuff of legend, and like most legends it has gone through a number of changes in the telling and retelling.

Linux.com's guide to the 2008 US presidential candidates

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Sci/Tech

linux.com: As November's national election looms in the United States, voters can expect increasing coverage of the hot-button issues through the mainstream media and campaign ads. On issues important to the open source and free software communities, however, information is harder to come by. Today we take a look at what the Democratic and Republican candidates say about questions close to the FOSS voter.

KDE Congratulates CERN's Large Hadron Collider

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KDE
Sci/Tech

dot.kde.org: Today was Big Bang Day at CERN as the world's largest science experiment was turned on. Like all good technology enthusiasts the KDE developers have been keeping up with the progress of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

Large Hadron Collider - powered by Linux

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Linux
Sci/Tech

blog.internetnews.com: The most powerful physics project in the history of the known universe - The $10 Billion Large Hadron Collider (LHC)- shot its first light speed beam this morning around its 27 km circuit. Beyond the 20 years it took to build and half of all the world's astrophysicists, it also takes another key ingredient to make LHC work -- Linux.

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