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Sci/Tech

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

nerdden.com: A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

Understanding Moore's Law

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Sci/Tech

arstechnica.com: In April of 1965, Electronics magazine published an article by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. The article and the predictions that it made have since become the stuff of legend, and like most legends it has gone through a number of changes in the telling and retelling.

Linux.com's guide to the 2008 US presidential candidates

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Sci/Tech

linux.com: As November's national election looms in the United States, voters can expect increasing coverage of the hot-button issues through the mainstream media and campaign ads. On issues important to the open source and free software communities, however, information is harder to come by. Today we take a look at what the Democratic and Republican candidates say about questions close to the FOSS voter.

KDE Congratulates CERN's Large Hadron Collider

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KDE
Sci/Tech

dot.kde.org: Today was Big Bang Day at CERN as the world's largest science experiment was turned on. Like all good technology enthusiasts the KDE developers have been keeping up with the progress of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

Large Hadron Collider - powered by Linux

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Linux
Sci/Tech

blog.internetnews.com: The most powerful physics project in the history of the known universe - The $10 Billion Large Hadron Collider (LHC)- shot its first light speed beam this morning around its 27 km circuit. Beyond the 20 years it took to build and half of all the world's astrophysicists, it also takes another key ingredient to make LHC work -- Linux.

Total solar eclipse on August 1, 2008, in Northern Hemisphere

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Sci/Tech

itwire.com: A total solar eclipse will begin in northern Canada early Friday morning, and sweep through Greenland, the Arctic, Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial solar eclipse will be seen in the northeastern parts of North America, and much of Europe and Asia.

openSUSE 11.0 - Smooth Outside and Rough Inside

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OS
Linux
News
OSS
SUSE
Sci/Tech

openSUSE 11.0 has been one of the most anticipated distributions of the 2008 release season. In terms of innovation, openSUSE is perhaps the most ambitious of all the highly popular Linux distros so far this year. Since its 10.0 release to the open source world in 2006, openSUSE has experienced its share of ups and downs, not the least of which has been questionable quality assurance on final releases. What will the 11.0 release bring to the Linux scene?

One tonne 'Baby' marks its birth

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Sci/Tech

bbc.co.uk: Sixty years ago the "modern computer" was born in a lab in Manchester. The Small Scale Experimental Machine, or "Baby", was the first to contain memory which could store a program.

Linux-powered clarinet playing robot wins international prize

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Sci/Tech

computerworld.com.au: A team of experts and students from NICTA and the University of NSW have won first place in a major international technology competition for developing a robotically operated, computer-driven clarinet that runs on Linux.

Mars Phoenix Lander - A Victory for Open Source

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OSS
Sci/Tech

ostatic.com: Space agencies were some of the first places you could find open source software "in the wild". Being natural early adopters, cash-strapped and very inquisitive they naturally took to the concept.

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.

Development News

  • Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers
    Vim text editor turned 25 late last year – the first public iteration was launched on November 2, 1991, a couple of weeks after Linus Torvalds announced Linux. To celebrate Vim's anniversary, creator Bram Moolenaar recently dropped version 8.0. Ordinarily the update of a text editor wouldn't be worth mentioning, but this is the first major Vim release in ten years. In today's world, where web browsers drop major point updates (what they consider major, anyway) several times a year, Vim's lack of major updates is not just refreshing, but speaks of an entirely different approach to developing software. Even leaving aside the absurd version system of today's web browsers, eight releases in 25 years would be considered slow by today's software development standards. Interestingly, though, Vim's biggest rival, GNU Emacs, has a roughly similar development pace. GNU Emacs began life in the 1970s and is currently at version 25, which means it averages two releases to Vim's one, but still definitely on the slow side.
  • Learn to code site Code.org loses student work due to index bug
    Learn-to-code site Code.org is apologising to its students after being caught by a database table maxing out, and dropping progress for an unknown number of participants. In its mea-culpa blog post, the group says it was burned by a database table with a 32-bit index.
  • GCC 7.0 Lands The BRIG Frontend For AMD's HSA
    GCC 7 moved on to only bug/documentation fixes but an exception was granted to allow the BRIG front-end to land for AMD's HSA support in this year's GNU Compiler Collection update. As of this morning, the BRIG front-end has merged. BRIG is the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). This BRING front-end also brings the libhsail-rt run-time into GCC. So far BRIG in GCC has just been tested on Linux x86_64.