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Sci/Tech

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

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Linux
Sci/Tech

nerdden.com: A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

Understanding Moore's Law

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Sci/Tech

arstechnica.com: In April of 1965, Electronics magazine published an article by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. The article and the predictions that it made have since become the stuff of legend, and like most legends it has gone through a number of changes in the telling and retelling.

Linux.com's guide to the 2008 US presidential candidates

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Sci/Tech

linux.com: As November's national election looms in the United States, voters can expect increasing coverage of the hot-button issues through the mainstream media and campaign ads. On issues important to the open source and free software communities, however, information is harder to come by. Today we take a look at what the Democratic and Republican candidates say about questions close to the FOSS voter.

KDE Congratulates CERN's Large Hadron Collider

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KDE
Sci/Tech

dot.kde.org: Today was Big Bang Day at CERN as the world's largest science experiment was turned on. Like all good technology enthusiasts the KDE developers have been keeping up with the progress of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

Large Hadron Collider - powered by Linux

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Linux
Sci/Tech

blog.internetnews.com: The most powerful physics project in the history of the known universe - The $10 Billion Large Hadron Collider (LHC)- shot its first light speed beam this morning around its 27 km circuit. Beyond the 20 years it took to build and half of all the world's astrophysicists, it also takes another key ingredient to make LHC work -- Linux.

Total solar eclipse on August 1, 2008, in Northern Hemisphere

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Sci/Tech

itwire.com: A total solar eclipse will begin in northern Canada early Friday morning, and sweep through Greenland, the Arctic, Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial solar eclipse will be seen in the northeastern parts of North America, and much of Europe and Asia.

openSUSE 11.0 - Smooth Outside and Rough Inside

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OS
Linux
News
OSS
SUSE
Sci/Tech

openSUSE 11.0 has been one of the most anticipated distributions of the 2008 release season. In terms of innovation, openSUSE is perhaps the most ambitious of all the highly popular Linux distros so far this year. Since its 10.0 release to the open source world in 2006, openSUSE has experienced its share of ups and downs, not the least of which has been questionable quality assurance on final releases. What will the 11.0 release bring to the Linux scene?

One tonne 'Baby' marks its birth

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Sci/Tech

bbc.co.uk: Sixty years ago the "modern computer" was born in a lab in Manchester. The Small Scale Experimental Machine, or "Baby", was the first to contain memory which could store a program.

Linux-powered clarinet playing robot wins international prize

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Sci/Tech

computerworld.com.au: A team of experts and students from NICTA and the University of NSW have won first place in a major international technology competition for developing a robotically operated, computer-driven clarinet that runs on Linux.

Mars Phoenix Lander - A Victory for Open Source

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OSS
Sci/Tech

ostatic.com: Space agencies were some of the first places you could find open source software "in the wild". Being natural early adopters, cash-strapped and very inquisitive they naturally took to the concept.

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