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Sci/Tech

How The Internet Works

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Sci/Tech

makeuseof.com: Once you finish this article, I’m sure you’ll be amazed that the Internet works at all! It’s easy to complain about slow download speeds, or lost e-mail, but, geez, it’s the Internet!

True believers: The biggest cults in tech

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Sci/Tech
Ubuntu

infoworld.com: Spend enough time around technology and it starts to get under your skin. It became a part of you. You began to identify with it, even develop a belief system around it. You may have attended regular meetings of others similarly afflicted, and openly despised members of other groups. Before you were even aware of it, you'd joined a cult.

Introducing CADIE

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Sci/Tech
Humor

google.com: For several years now a small research group has been working on some challenging problems in the areas of neural networking, natural language and autonomous problem-solving. Last fall this group achieved a significant breakthrough. Research group switches on world's first "artificial intelligence" tasked-array system.

5 Technologies that will shape the future of Linux

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Sci/Tech

handlewithlinux.com: I like to contemplate the technology of the future and there are some things I think will be very important in the future of Linux. Following a small list of 5 technologies that will in my opinion shape the future of linux.

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

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Linux
Sci/Tech

nerdden.com: A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

Understanding Moore's Law

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Sci/Tech

arstechnica.com: In April of 1965, Electronics magazine published an article by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. The article and the predictions that it made have since become the stuff of legend, and like most legends it has gone through a number of changes in the telling and retelling.

Linux.com's guide to the 2008 US presidential candidates

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Sci/Tech

linux.com: As November's national election looms in the United States, voters can expect increasing coverage of the hot-button issues through the mainstream media and campaign ads. On issues important to the open source and free software communities, however, information is harder to come by. Today we take a look at what the Democratic and Republican candidates say about questions close to the FOSS voter.

KDE Congratulates CERN's Large Hadron Collider

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KDE
Sci/Tech

dot.kde.org: Today was Big Bang Day at CERN as the world's largest science experiment was turned on. Like all good technology enthusiasts the KDE developers have been keeping up with the progress of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

Large Hadron Collider - powered by Linux

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Linux
Sci/Tech

blog.internetnews.com: The most powerful physics project in the history of the known universe - The $10 Billion Large Hadron Collider (LHC)- shot its first light speed beam this morning around its 27 km circuit. Beyond the 20 years it took to build and half of all the world's astrophysicists, it also takes another key ingredient to make LHC work -- Linux.

Total solar eclipse on August 1, 2008, in Northern Hemisphere

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Sci/Tech

itwire.com: A total solar eclipse will begin in northern Canada early Friday morning, and sweep through Greenland, the Arctic, Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial solar eclipse will be seen in the northeastern parts of North America, and much of Europe and Asia.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries
    A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses. However, if your project doesn't justify the cost of implementing a traditional CDN, the use of an open source CDN may be more suitable. Typically, these types of CDNs allow you to link to popular web-based libraries (CSS/JS frameworks, for example), which are then delivered to your web visitors from the free CDN's servers. Although CDN services for open source libraries do not allow you to upload your own content to their servers, they can help you accelerate libraries globally and improve your website's redundancy.
  • Users stand up, speak out, and deliver data on OpenStack growth
    Last week, the OpenStack Foundation announced the results of its ninth user survey. OpenStack users responded in record-breaking numbers to participate, and their voices as revealed in the data tell the real story of OpenStack. The OpenStack community is growing, thriving with new users, deployments, code contributions, and collaborations, all on the rise. User diversity is expanding across geographies and organizational sizes. And OpenStack's ability to integrate with innovative technologies is paving the way for advancements not even dreamed of just five years ago.
  • How to get started learning to program

Huawei, Google supercharge Android with new Raspberry Pi-like board

Prepare to run Android at blazing fast speeds on a new Raspberry Pi-like computer developed by Huawei. Huawei's HiKey 960 computer board is priced at US$239 but has some of the latest CPU and GPU technologies. Google, ARM, Huawei, Archermind, and LeMaker all played roles in developing the board. The HiKey 960 is meant to be a go-to PC for Android or a tool to develop software and drivers for the OS. The board development was backed by Linaro, an organization that develops software packages for the Android OS and ARM architecture. Read more

Debian Derivatives: Q4OS and Devuan

  • Debian-Based Q4OS 1.8.4 Operating System Lets Users Select Alternative Desktops
    Today, April 26, 2017, the developers behind the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution announced the release of the fourth stability and security update of the Q4OS 1.8 "Orion" series. Q4OS 1.8.4 comes almost two months after the release of the previous point release, and besides incorporating all the security patches backported from the upstream repositories of the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series, it adds an exciting new feature, namely the integration of alternative desktop environments.
  • Which is Free, Which is Open … [Also]

    Devuan and Debian need not defer to the Open Source Initiative regarding what is Open Source, since the OSI is just using Debian's Free Software Guidelines. Debian's Free Software Guidelines are a definition of Free Software, not specifically Open Source. At the time they were created, RMS personally approved of them as "a good definition of Free Software".

Leftovers: Software

  • Luminance HDR 2.5.0 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu
    Luminance HDR is an open-source tool that lets you create and edit high-dynamic-range images (HDR) on Linux, Windows and macOS. The app recently got its first major update in several years and I figured it was something a few of you might wanna know about (and hey, we’ve featured a couple of other photography tools recently).
  • SMPlayer 17.4.2 Open-Source Media Player Supports MPlayer's ffhevcvdpau Decoder
    A new stable update of the open-source and cross-platform SMPlayer media player was announced recently, versioned 17.4.2, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows. SMPlayer 17.4.2 is now the latest stable release of the popular media player applications, and it looks like it ships with various exciting improvements and new features. One of these is support for using the ffhevcvdpau decoder from the MPlayer project, but only on Linux-based operating systems.
  • Gyazo – An Easy Way to Capture Screenshots, GIFs and Save Websites
    Gyazo is a screen capturing application with which you can quickly take quality shots of your screen and also create GIFs on the fly with a simple click. It is as simple to use as another screen capture tool we wrote on earlier, Peek, but Gyazo seems to have an edge in terms of functionality, customizability, and extension; at least, for now.
  • The many ways of running firefox on OpenBSD

    Maybe i haven't talked about it enough on the lists, but since i've been maintaining the various mozillas in the portstree (cvs log says i started around firefox 3.6.something... 7 years ago. *sigh*) a lot of things changed, so i wanted take the 6.1 release as an occasion to sum up the various ways one could run which version of which firefox on which version of OpenBSD.