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Sci/Tech

Com One Phoenix Wi-Fi radio rises from embedded Linux platform

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Sci/Tech

linux.com: Com One's Phoenix Wi-Fi radio is a home music appliance built on an embedded Linux foundation. Phoenix lets you stream music or play podcasts as easily as you can listen to a car radio, once you tell it what you want to hear. Its ability to play Internet radio is nice -- but is it worth its price?

Total lunar eclipse February 20: Americas, western Europe

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itwire.com: On the evening of Wednesday, February 20, 2008, the greatest beauty (mid-point) of the total lunar eclipse will occur at approximately 10:26 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) on the east coast of the Americas, 7:26 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST) on the west coast, and 03:26 Universal Time (UT).

A First Tussle With Linux's iPhone Killer: The OpenMoko Neo1973

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wired: The Neo1973 is the first physical manifestation of a grand idea -- a new breed of wireless handheld built for the open-source age. Using Linux, it is the first release from the OpenMoko project, a group working to create a fully open source software platform for smartphones, a community-driven alternative to, say, the iPhone.

RIP Linux "Greenphone"

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linuxdevices: Trolltech has discontinued its Linux-based "Greenphone" development platform. Trolltech made a big splash with the Greenphone at LinuxWorld 2006. As the first Linux-based mobile phone with user-modifiable firmware, the phone was designed to provide wireless carriers and third-party application developers real-world target hardware.

No Linux Love for New iPods: Why You Shouldn't Care

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OSWeekly: Newsflash for those of you who believe that we lost iPod support - we never had it in the first place. It's true, and frankly, the fact that Apple has decided to make themselves even more isolated in their own world is fine by me.

Dinosaur Sightings: 1970s computers

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c|net: This gallery showcases several 1970s-era machines from Steven Stengel's vintage computer collection. Stengel has graciously allowed CNET to republish his photos and descriptions. The Model 5100 is IBM's first microcomputer (not a mainframe) and is also considered the world's first portable computer.

NASA administrator Griffin predicts humans on Mars by 2037

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iTWire: At the 58th International Aeronautical Congress (IAC-2007), being held from September 24-28, 2007, NASA administrator Michael Griffin says “Our long-term game-plan is to put man on Mars by 2037”

See the Harvest Moon Wednesday, September 26, 2007

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iTWire: A Harvest Moon is a full Moon that appears closest to the autumnal equinox, which occurs in 2007 on September 23 in the northern hemisphere. The name “Harvest Moon” is named so because farmers are able to work later at night “harvesting” their crops due to the reflected light coming off of the full Moon.

Moore's Law: No more

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BBC: Speaking to BBC News, Dr Gordon Moore said that he expected the proposition that bears his name should continue "for at least another decade. Eventually, however, we're down approaching the dimensions of individual atoms and that's clearly as far as we can go down the path of shrinking dimensions."

Linux powered TreCorder speeds up data collection at crime scenes

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daniweb: A new forensic computer from a UK based company promises to make the task of gathering evidence at the scene of a crime much easier. The dual booting Windows XP and Suse Linux TreCorder portable forensic lab is built into a rugged portable chassis and can simultaneously copy up to three hard drives at a speed of 2GB per minute per drive.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

  • Open-source oriented RISELab emerges at UC Berkeley to make apps smarter & more secure
    UC Berkeley on Monday launched a five-year research collaborative dubbed RISELab that will focus on enabling apps and machines that can interact with the environment around them securely and in real-time. The RISELab (Real-time Intelligence with Secure Execution) is backed by a slew of big name tech and financial firms: Amazon Web Services, Ant Financial, Capital One, Ericsson, GE Digital, Google, Huawei, Intel, IBM, Microsoft and VMWare.
  • Telecom organizations boosting support for open source
    Organizational support for open source initiatives is easing the integration of platforms into the telecom world. One key challenge for growing the support of open source into the telecommunications space is through various organizations that are looking to either bolster the use of open source or build platforms based on open source specifications. These efforts are seen as beneficial to operators and vendors looking to take advantage of open source platforms.
  • Google's Draco: Another Open Source Tool That Can Boost Virtual Reality Apps
    With 2017 ramping up, there is no doubt that cloud computing and Big Data analytics would probably come to mind if you had to consider the hot technology categories that will spread out this year. However, Google is on an absolute tear as it open sources a series of 3D graphics and virtual reality toolsets. Last week, we covered the arrival of Google's Tilt Brush apps and virtual reality toolsets. Now, Google has delivered a set of open source libraries that boost the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which can help deliver more detailed 3D apps. "Draco" is an open source compression library, and here are more details.
  • Unpicking the community leader
    Today is Community Manager Appreciation Day. Now, I have to admit, I don't usually partake in the day all that much. The skeptic in me thinks doing so could be a little self-indulgent and the optimist thinks that we should appreciate great community leaders every day, not merely one day a year. Regardless, in respect of the occasion, I want to delve a little into why I think this work is so important, particularly in the way it empowers people from all walks of life. In 2006 I joined Canonical as the Ubuntu Community Manager. A few months into my new role I got an email from a kid based in Africa. He shared with me that he loved Ubuntu and the traditional African philosophy of Ubuntu, which translated to "humanity towards others," and this made his interest in the nascent Linux operating system particularly meaningful.
  • Open Source Mahara Opens Moodle Further Into Social Learning
    Designers, managers and other professionals are fond of Open Source, digital portfolio solution Mahara. Even students are incorporating their progress on specific competency frameworks, to show learning evidence. Mahara and Moodle have a long and durable relationship spanning years, ―so much so that the internet has nicknamed the super couple as “Mahoodle“―. A recent post on Moodlerooms’ E-Learn Magazine documents the fruitful partnership as it adds value to New Zealander Catalyst IT’s offerings.
  • U.S. policy on open source software carries IP risks [Ed: Latest FUD from law firm against Free software as if proprietary software is risk-free licensing-wise?]

Openwashing and EEE

Q&A with Arpit Joshipura, Head of Networking for The Linux Foundation

Arpit Joshipura became the Linux Foundation’s new general manager for networking and orchestration in December 2016. He’s tasked with a pretty tall order. He needs to harmonize all the different Linux Foundation open source groups that are working on aspects of network virtualization. Joshipura may be the right person for the job as his 30 years of experience is broad — ranging from engineering, to management, to chief marketing officer (CMO) roles. Most recently he was VP of marketing with Prevoty, an application security company. Prior to that he served as VP of marketing at Dell after the company acquired Force10 Networks, where he had been CMO. Read more