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Sci/Tech

The 'WOW' Signal turns 30

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Sci/Tech

cosmiclog: 30 years ago astronomer Jerry Ehman was looking over a printout of radio data from Ohio State University's Big Ear Radio Observatory when he saw a string of code so remarkable that he had to circle it and scribble "Wow!" in the margin. The printout recorded an anomalous signal so strong that it had to come from an extraordinary source.

Linux's answer to Microsoft's Surface

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tectonic: In May this year Microsoft's Bill Gates showed off his expensive touch-sensitive table called Surface. Now the Linux world has a similar project under development and has released videos of it in action. While the DiamondTouch employs a different technology to Microsoft's TouchLight, the final result is even better.

Is this the successor to the Nokia N800?

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engadget: Just when we're in full-on video game mode, along comes a friendly tipster with some shots of the supposed successor to Nokia's N800 Internet Tablet.

OpenMoko Neo1973 - an open source Linux based iPhone killer in the making ?

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All About Linux: OpenMoko is a GNU/Linux based open software development platform. What this means for the lay person is that using OpenMoko software development kit, phone manufacturers will be able to bring out mobile phones which have more or less the same features of the now widely known iPhone from Apple and much more - all this under an Open license powered by GNU.

Second open Linux phone on sale

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ZDNet: Another fully open source-based phone went on sale on Monday, offering developers the chance to build their own mobile Linux applications.

Girls get grounding in gigabytes

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Sci/Tech

telegram.com: The group of 10- to 14-year-olds was busy installing and configuring the Linux operating system on computers they had finished building.

Open-source software makes the invisible man

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Sci/Tech

PC Pro: A University of Liverpool mathematician claims 30-year-old open-source software has cracked the equation that will allow scientists to make objects - such as humans, tanks or even entire islands - invisible.

Computing Grid Helps Get to the Heart of Matter

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eWeek: At CERN, the PCs, CPU servers and disks are linked on a 1G-bps network provided by Hewlett-Packard ProCurve switches. CERN itself will contribute 10 percent of the total necessary processors for the job, including 3,500 PCs and the rest single- or dual-core processors all running a version of Linux called Scientific Linux CERN.

Terminator kill-bots to be run by system called 'Skynet'

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The Register: Following the announcement of the new Flying-HK-style "Reaper" death machines for the British forces, the prophetic nature of the Terminator movies has been further confirmed.

'Kryptonite' Discovered In Serbia

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A new mineral discovered in Serbia shares the chemical composition of kryptonite, the fictitious green substance that robbed comic book and film hero Superman of his powers.

In Superman Returns, the chemical composition of kryptonite is identified as "sodium lithium boron silicate hydroxide with fluorine."

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