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Sci/Tech

Computing Grid Helps Get to the Heart of Matter

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Sci/Tech

eWeek: At CERN, the PCs, CPU servers and disks are linked on a 1G-bps network provided by Hewlett-Packard ProCurve switches. CERN itself will contribute 10 percent of the total necessary processors for the job, including 3,500 PCs and the rest single- or dual-core processors all running a version of Linux called Scientific Linux CERN.

Terminator kill-bots to be run by system called 'Skynet'

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The Register: Following the announcement of the new Flying-HK-style "Reaper" death machines for the British forces, the prophetic nature of the Terminator movies has been further confirmed.

'Kryptonite' Discovered In Serbia

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Sci/Tech

A new mineral discovered in Serbia shares the chemical composition of kryptonite, the fictitious green substance that robbed comic book and film hero Superman of his powers.

In Superman Returns, the chemical composition of kryptonite is identified as "sodium lithium boron silicate hydroxide with fluorine."

US 'no longer technology king'

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The US has lost its position as the world's primary engine of technology innovation, according to a report by the World Economic Forum.

The US is now ranked seventh in the body's league table measuring the impact of technology on the development of nations.

A deterioration of the political and regulatory environment in the US prompted the fall, the report said.

Scientists create world's thinnest material

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Sci/Tech

Researchers have created the world’s thinnest material which they hope could mark a breakthrough in the development of super-fast computer chips. The sheet, which is just a single atom thick, has been used to make the world’s smallest transistor.

See the total lunar eclipse on March 3, 2007

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Sci/Tech

Without a total eclipse in almost two-and-one-half years, sky gazers will be able to observe a total lunar eclipse on Saturday, March 3, 2007 from the eastern Americas, the United Kingdom, Europe, Africa, Iceland, Greenaldn, Arctic, the Middle East in western Asia.

SCALE 5x - Linux Expo in Los Angeles This Weekend

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Linux
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SCALE 5x, the 2007 Southern California Linux Expo will be held in Los Angeles, CA this weeken On Feb 9-11, 2007. It will include: 50+ seminars, 70+ exhibitors, BoFs, and more. Highlighted speakers will include Chris Dibona, Don Marti, Ted Haeger, Jono Bacon, and others. Exhibitors include: Dell, IBM, Verio, Redhat, GroundWork Open Source, ReactOS, Haiku OS, and PostgreSQL. One lucky attendee will win a Dual Xeon 1U Rackmount Server from Silicon Mechanics. Two other conference to be held on Friday Feb 9th include: Women In Open Source, and Open Source Health Care Summit.

Useful cloaking device is one step closer to reality

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Sci/Tech

Last October saw a major breakthrough in an area of research that, until very recently, was squarely in the realm of science fiction—cloaking technology.

French space agency to publish UFO archive online

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Sci/Tech

The French space agency is to publish its archive of UFO sightings and other phenomena online, but will keep the names of those who reported them off the site to protect them from pestering by space fanatics.

Alternatives to Skype beginning Jan 1, 2007

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Sci/Tech

My reasons are not the price. Yes, free is appealing and $14.95 / year is by no means a large expense to anyone. My main reason is that Skype does not use a standard protocol for its communication. There are many other SIP options available, most of which use an open communication protocol.

Also: A Free Telephone

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

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When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

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